Just Two Good Old Boys

008 Just Two Good Old Boys

December 14, 2022 Gene Naftulyev Season 2022 Episode 8
Just Two Good Old Boys
008 Just Two Good Old Boys
Just Two Good Old Boys
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Gene:

Well, howdy, Ben. How are you doing today?

Ben:

is the danger of doing this type of

Gene:

You sound a little less less nasally today.

Ben:

It's the danger of doing this type of research. You know, Fort

Gene:

Got the covid. See?

Ben:

ostensibly was shut down by Congress, right. Banning gain

Gene:

Well, isn't that what they renamed colds to Covid? Why? I thought I always vote with the new cold. The old cold. It's always been a colds. So good. Let's talk about that. I haven't watched it, but I saw the, the, it's popping up on my recommendations everywhere. I just haven't watched it yet. Mm, mm-hmm.

Ben:

think a lot of people are waking up to that fact. And, you know, when we, the Twitter files, I don't know

Gene:

That's interesting.

Ben:

But the Twitter files have been

Gene:

my, now these are coming from a study done in the UK, I believe. Right.

Ben:

Maybe a few people will wake up and see that the FBI and everybody does not necessarily have your best interests at. you call it morticians that are doing,

Gene:

right, but British morticians.

Ben:

not just British. There's us, there's Australia, and there's all of them.

Gene:

Oh, okay, okay, okay. Because I, I know one of the things that people have talked about is that in the British study of, of deaths the they're saying, well, there's, there's actually more people that haven't had the shot than have, but that's actually being contested now because the group, the sample was based on a particular subset of people, and I can't remember what the subset was, but it's basically like, it includes about 20% of the population, and then out of that 20% of the population they are pulling the data about this. So it was something like, I mean, it's not college students, but it's sort of like, if the only people in your study were college students, and then they were talking about it as though it was the entire population in all age groups. It was that kind of thing that was discovered.

Ben:

this is morticians doing embalming, having trouble getting the embalming fluid into people, and they're pulling out these fibrous clots that are not blood clots. It's a white tissue, not like a dark red tissue. And yeah, they're seeing it across the population.

Gene:

Yeah. So are these like spiderwebs?

Ben:

I mean, it takes on the shape of the vein or artery that it's in. And I mean, what they're pulling out people is absolutely just crazy. I mean, feet of this material,

Gene:

Well, we have, I can't remember how many, but like a thousand feet of blood vessels

Ben:

well, it's miles per pound. So a as you gain weight you have, you know, miles and miles of blood vessels that are established.

Gene:

miles. Really? I didn't think it was that much. Hmm.

Ben:

It's a lot.

Gene:

Yeah. So yeah. Not good stuff. I don't, I'm, I'm honestly, I'm starting to think that maybe a, a reset is a good thing.

Ben:

Why is that?

Gene:

I think people are getting stupider. We need a, we need a reset.

Ben:

Yeah. So average human has 60,000 miles of blood vessels.

Gene:

60,000. Wow. That's crazy.

Ben:

You have a lot of blood vessels in your body.

Gene:

Yeah,

Ben:

This is according to Wikipedia.

Gene:

So if you're pulling something else, a couple of feet out of 60,000 miles, it's not really a big deal, is it?

Ben:

depends on where it is.

Gene:

Hmm. And are these coming out of people's hearts or what?

Ben:

Yeah. There in the, in the movie died suddenly Take it for what it's worth. But there is a heart surgeon that literally pulls one of these obstructions out of a beating heart.

Gene:

Oh, wow.

Ben:

I mean, it's graphic. It's not something that anyone really wants to watch. It's gross, but it's something that everyone should watch and go, what the hell is this?

Gene:

what's making'em? I mean, is it a protein, is it a what, what's it

Ben:

They have not. And that's the thing is this is not really being studied, it's being ignored at this point still.

Gene:

Well, that seems strange.

Ben:

Well, why, based off of what we have learned over the medi about the medical profession over the last few years,

Gene:

Well, someone's gotta be interested in this. I mean, there's gotta be some people, not, not everybody was on the pro-vaccine side, so there's plenty of people that you would think would be sending this thing.

Ben:

Yeah. And they, they're in this movie, they're the ones putting this

Gene:

none of'em have actually figured out what it's made of.

Ben:

They did not disclose that information, which, you know, is somewhat subs suspect. That said again, nationally, internationally, we should be having the conversation of, okay, what is this? Why is this

Gene:

And is it, is it made out of corn syrup?

Ben:

Yeah. Is it just a hoax? You know, is it the virus causing this? Is it the vaccine? What, what, what is generating. E Exactly. You know, one of the statistics that they brought up that I just found astonishing was that all c all cause mortality went up 40%.

Gene:

Yeah. Yep.

Ben:

40%. That is a shocking number.

Gene:

It's a big jump.

Ben:

I mean, it's unprecedented. A war. The actuaries, you know, world War, the actuaries would only estimate a 10% jump. So when you're seeing a 40% jump, that's

Gene:

Well, and then in a fairly young age range too.

Ben:

in, in all age ranges. But yes the skew is

Gene:

between 25 and

Ben:

in 30. Yep.

Gene:

Yeah. I was watching a a program that was done by some investment bank or other talking, I mean, it's from an investment standpoint, but looking at the cost of this shit. And they were talking about how the last big increase in mortality of that age group happened and it was 8% and it people were panicking.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

This is unprecedented in the history that's been recorded.

Ben:

well, I mean the life insurance companies, everybody are. Staggered by this, they, they don't know what to make of it or do, and, you know, do you rewrite all the actuary tables that have literally hundreds of years worth of data backing them up? Or do you say, okay, this is a blip? You know,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

I mean, from a financial standpoint, the insurance companies are absolutely just getting hammered. There, there's no two ways around that. So,

Gene:

No, no. And, and even if this is a blip caused by, doesn't matter what, but it's a blip, meaning it goes back to normal. Everybody will pay higher insurance premiums now for the next a hundred years because of it. I mean, this, this, this current payout and financial distressed insurance industry is having will end up causing them to be profitable for the next hundred years because they're gonna base their tables to include this, even if it doesn't happen again.

Ben:

Well, and, and that's the key point is distress, right? This is just a what the hell moment? So I don't know. We'll see where this goes. You know, when you have all calls, mortality going up by this amount, it, you, you have to sit there and think, okay, is, you know, when Bill Gates and everybody else, when you have the Georgia Guidestones wanting population reduction, man, it just.

Gene:

Yep.

Ben:

can pee on my face and tell me it's rain only for so long, I guess is what I'm saying.

Gene:

Yeah, yeah. No, it's, it, I think it totally is. It's regardless of what the cause is, I think that there are a lot of people that would want the smaller population right now.

Ben:

let's say it's the virus and you know, lab leak is almost a certainty at this point versus,

Gene:

or

Ben:

okay, I'm sorry.

Gene:

Or release.

Ben:

Yeah. Or release. So re regardless we have something that is, I think everyone can say, is manmade causing this? And was it done with intention, is the question?

Gene:

Yeah. So whether it was the vaccine that was man-made or the virus that was man-made,

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

yeah. Or it could be a completely different biological weapon that we haven't yet been told about.

Ben:

Possible but unlikely at this point.

Gene:

Oh. I would say it's very likely if, if we agree that the the Covid virus was created in the lab, there are thousands of other viruses that have been created in other labs, including that lab, by the way, that it's not like they were only working on Covid,

Ben:

Hmm.

Gene:

and the odds are of one of those being released. is just as high as this one being released. We just don't know about it. Cuz it hasn't made the headlines.

Ben:

And, you know, this is the danger of doing this

Gene:

I mean, there ought to be one coming from South America any day now.

Ben:

It's the danger of doing this type of research. You know, Fort Dietrich ostensibly was shut down by Congress, right. Banning gain of function research. But all we did was really move it and export it.

Gene:

Yeah. Well, the US government in I'd say almost universally has decided that prohibition simply means they have to outsource it. So if something's prohibited, it just means like, we're not allowed to assassinate people. It just means we have to hire somebody to go do it. We're not allowed to run you know, torture programs. It just means we have to outsource it to a country where they're happy to do that on our behalf. It, it's, there's no such thing as prohibition at this point in the US government. It just, prohibition just is equivalent to outsourcing.

Ben:

Well, I think a lot of people are waking up to that fact. And, you know, when we, the Twitter files, I don't know if you've been following that or not, but the Twitter files have been just egregious enough that, you know, hey, maybe maybe a few people will wake up and see that the FBI and everybody does not necessarily have your best interests

Gene:

Well, I called for Yoel to be in prison when Musk was just buying Twitter, and I was the only one doing it. Other people,

Ben:

who do you want to be in prison?

Gene:

Yoel the, the head of trusted Twitter.

Ben:

trust and safety. Yeah. There are lots of heads that need to roll

Gene:

There are, there are, but his is definitely one of'em, and I'm, I'm happy to once again be indicated that they're now publishing actual election middling that people at Twitter were engaged in coming up with reasons to ban somebody after the fact is a a trait of a program that is run based on what's the word? You know, basically being in the cult

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

based on those types of motivations rather than on treating things according to the, their own rules or standards.

Ben:

Well, and you know, Musk is n no saint in that manner either. You know what he's doing in his arbitrary, because I say so banning of certain people is very much in a similar vein that said,

Gene:

Well, it's different vain because his is public.

Ben:

Yes, it's different that it's public, it's different that he is taking you know, a, a different tract on this. He's

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, he's come out and just said that, just, I'm gonna ban anybody that's engaging in pedophilia on Twitter.

Ben:

dude, the turnaround that he has brought in the child's stuff is immediate. And it makes you wonder, okay, why were you having such a hard time doing this before? You know, or, you know,

Gene:

Well,

Ben:

you really trying

Gene:

they enjoyed pedophilia is why I mean,

Ben:

hope that that is

Gene:

now found a comment of Yoel saying, you know, is there, like, is there really a need to check whether, or, I can't remember. I'm gonna butcher it. So this is not quote, this is a paraphrase, but it's something to the effect of is there really a need to see whether a student and the teacher are engaging in the consensual relationship or not? So something to that effect. It was like he was, he was questioning the need for Consent to exist,

Ben:

huh? Well, I mean, obviously consent needs to exist, but,

Gene:

but he's a professor, he's a PhD, super smart guide. He knows better.

Ben:

Yeah, we should totally just listen to that.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. I think that there's a, I'm not going off of any studies cause I don't think anyone's would do a study on this cuz the people doing studies are the ones that would be in the study. But I, I really do think that the percentage of people that like young people, a little too much is much higher in ECA academia than it is in the general population.

Ben:

Okay. Interesting. Why, why do you feel that,

Gene:

Because who the fuck wants to be working with kids? What man wants to spend his days with children? Not his children, other

Ben:

you know, the percentage of male teachers

Gene:

I just don't trust it. I, I, I, and same thing with people of other persuasions than traditional female Why do you wanna hang around kids? What are you getting out of that?

Ben:

Well, uh, you

Gene:

I don't wanna hang around kids. I have zero interest in hanging around kids. They're annoying. That's the standard position of a heterosexual.

Ben:

kids can also be amazing

Gene:

your kids, not somebody else's kids.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

And they're only you. You only think that because your biology has evolved into thinking that way. But for, for somebody to want to hang out with a bunch of kids, I mean, first thing comes to mind is Catholic priests and we all know about the percentages in that population.

Ben:

Well, that population is definitely inflated by dogmatic law, preventing them from marrying and

Gene:

Yeah. Why would you want to not have sex

Ben:

Well, I mean

Gene:

and be around kids? I mean, you're just asking for trouble. Like that's the people that you select to be in charge of your church. People that prefer to not have sex and prefer to be around children.

Ben:

I don't think that they prefer, I think it's just the

Gene:

well, why are they working there then? A lot of people can be Catholics. Not everybody needs to work in the church, do they?

Ben:

No,

Gene:

There you go. Self-selection.

Ben:

I, you definitely have a selection bias, but yeah.

Gene:

So my general position is you elect politicians that don't want to be politicians. You have teachers that don't like children, and that's how you stay safe. And you're gonna be much better off is when you start having people that prefer to be doing certain things. That they shouldn't be preferring. Bad things are gonna come out of, it's gonna paint to all teachers with the same brush. They're all pedophiles.

Ben:

Gene@sirinaspeaks.com.

Gene:

Yeah. Comments welcome.

Ben:

Yeah, I, I don't know that I agree that there's a selection bias there, and then you have to ask, okay, does that hold up for the female population as well, or are we just talking the male?

Gene:

it does, it's just that the, you know, most male students wouldn't object.

Ben:

Well, there is that. And when you have a, I mean, when you, when you have a new teacher fresh out of college, I mean, you're not

Gene:

hot for teacher.

Ben:

gap, you know, there. And, yeah. Anyway,

Gene:

Yeah. I was, I was dating a 27 year old when I was a teenager. It works well. They're just

Ben:

your, your age bracket hasn't changed much over your life, hasn't

Gene:

Well, I found a good one, Wow. Why would it change And if people were more honest, they would agree with me.

Ben:

Uhhuh sure.

Gene:

huh?

Ben:

Nah, I, I don't know. I, I've always gone for someone generally my own age,

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

exceptions here and there, so,

Gene:

Well that's, that's definitely, I think, considered more. Approved and appropriate.

Ben:

Yes, definitely more appropriate.

Gene:

Uhhuh

Ben:

So Santa Claus, that's your exit strategy?

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. I've, I've had that strategy for years and years. I'm like, either I'm gonna lose a bunch of weight or I'm gonna be working in Santa Claus.

Ben:

Well, you, you definitely have the physique for it.

Gene:

I have the beard for it this way. I think what you meant,

Ben:

I meant what I said, but it's

Gene:

Uhhuh

Ben:

Yeah, no, that, that, that was an interesting

Gene:

Yes. I can't wait to just sit in a shopping mall with a bunch of kids sitting on my lap.

Ben:

So Gene, you're self-selecting kids

Gene:

No, no. Not at all. Because I hate kids. So I'm a perfect candidate for Santa Claus.

Ben:

Huh.

Gene:

Yep.

Ben:

okay. And why is that?

Gene:

I just explained this. I think it, it's, you wanna avoid people that have too much of a epithelial appreciation of kids into the best, to best people to be around. Kids are people that dislike them.

Ben:

Yep. I guess well,

Gene:

Now, if I was working as Santa Claus and you know, miss Universe Pageant, that'd be a whole different manner.

Ben:

You give again enough rope

Gene:

Uhhuh

Ben:

you go. So we've definitely seen an uptick in some interesting activities. Aah. Last shows commentary on French style revolution.

Gene:

Yeah, I agree with that.

Ben:

We keep seeing an increase in violence. We keep seeing, you know, some of what Tim cast has had to go through. And then, you know, just the general public, it's not looking

Gene:

keep going that way. I had a conversation with an old friend of mine who is a liberal living in California known this guy forever, like 40 years, 35 years, something like that. And you know, he's one of those sort of liberals of conveniences,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

meaning he makes enough money to not have to worry about anything. And being a liberal makes you look like you care. But,

Ben:

is a virtue signaler.

Gene:

well he is not even so much a virtual singler as he just lives in a place that's full of liberals and in a nice house and in, and all his friends are liberal, so he doesn't really care. But he, he likes to shoot guns too, but, you know, he's not gonna talk about it to his friends.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

But anyway but he totally agrees. He's, he, he thinks that the crime. Is going to, well, crime, I should say, use of violence, whether it's crime or not is a different issue, but use of violence is going to have a huge uptick next year. So we're in total agreement on that. And I think that's that's gonna be one of the things that's a prelude to the French style revolution.

Ben:

And what kind of violence do you think we'll likely see

Gene:

Well, there've been tons of movies that have demonstrated it you know, escape from New York. It, it's basically police's job is going to be shifting more and more to policing what people think. And the the response to criminality will be taken a lot more, but into people's own hands.

Ben:

Yeah, I mean, I think we are seeing a major shift in how policing is structured throughout the country, and the laws are supporting this, you know, in a, I think now at this point, a majority of major min municipalities, if it's under a thousand dollars, they don't care. You know, that's a, that's a huge, huge lift and shift of where we were just a very short period of time ago. So with

Gene:

I'm trying to remember, I think Darrell said that in Chicago it's like 2000 though.

Ben:

It's insane.

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

You know, the, the point is police are not doing what our social contract says that they should be. So, yeah,

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

I've got family that are police. My my

Gene:

I'm sorry.

Ben:

Chief of police for Beaumont many years ago, and, you know, I've, I've never been a huge fan of the police and he had a joke that I always found in very poor taste. You know, he, he said I had a job once. I didn't very much like it, so I became a police officer.

Gene:

Oh, that sounds, exactly. That's not a joke. That's actually truth.

Ben:

Well, yeah, I mean, this is former chief police of a fairly major municipality in the state of Texas that flat out said that. So yeah.

Gene:

And that's, I, I think I've talked about my opinion of police so many times on this in other shows, I don't need to rehash it. So I don't really see anything bad necessarily about the shift of getting rid of police and just having citizens act in the way that they should be anyway, which is being in charge of their personal property themselves.

Ben:

Defending

Gene:

But unfortunately, it doesn't mean that the number of incidents will be going up because the criminal types are going to see the lack of policing as an open door invitation. To engage in more criminal activity.

Ben:

Well, and there's gonna have to be a settling out to equilibrium where, you know, at first people are not defending themselves, not doing what they need to do, and then they start to, and the criminals, you know, it, it'll work itself out.

Gene:

It will in, in the end we'll end up with more car cartel control. That's usually what always happens because the cartels will come in.

Ben:

go through the roof.

Gene:

Exactly. Exactly. You, you're gonna have somebody that'll come in to replace the police. It's usually gonna be a, a cartel or a mob or somebody like that.

Ben:

Yes. So when you start seeing a lot of Italians in your neighborhood

Gene:

Yeah, yeah, exactly. Have Italians just walking around patrolling.

Ben:

Yeah. Ha. Have you watched Tulsa King at all?

Gene:

I haven't watched any television in quite a while other than Star Trek. Like I, for the last two months, the only thing I watched the Star Trek,

Ben:

well, strange New Worlds is definitely a good series.

Gene:

Yeah. It was much better than what I expected. And you know, we'll see how it continues. Cuz I think you mentioned last show that it was extended for two more years,

Ben:

Yes. It's been picked up

Gene:

so we'll see how that shapes up. I'm curious to see how they started introducing the miniskirts,

Ben:

Yeah. I, I, I don't think they're

Gene:

in uniform was gonna be. Well, that, that's not authentic, is it?

Ben:

Well, I mean,

Gene:

And what's wrong with miniskirts, by the way?

Ben:

They're lovely. I don't know

Gene:

Okay, well there you go. They should introduce them. They did. They did get rid of one of my favorite characters on there though, at the end of the season, which was unfortunate. I'm not sure why they wrote her off.

Ben:

who's that?

Gene:

the yeah. What's her name? The number two. Number one.

Ben:

Well, they didn't really write her off and she will

Gene:

Well, they put her in prison. That's pretty much writing her off.

Ben:

Ah

Gene:

well, in the future version that he went to, that Pike went to, she had already been in prison for five years and, and you weren't allowed to go and see her? I'd say that's pretty much writing her off.

Ben:

I, I, I bet you there's a redemption arc there and that changes.

Gene:

Okay. I'll betcha five bucks. It's not gonna happen.

Ben:

Okay. Deal.

Gene:

good deal right there. We got everybody on the podcast as a witness.

Ben:

Bucks is five bucks,

Gene:

yeah.

Ben:

I'll

Gene:

I think she'll be in prison. Yeah, I'll take your money. I, I'm pretty sure she's gonna be written off the show in prison. But I did like her character. I, well, I like the actress in general. She's, she's done a lot of funny stuff.

Ben:

ma'am. What'd you think about the engineer and the change there?

Gene:

What? Killing off the blind guy.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

I thought that was good because we shouldn't have a blind engineer. Nothing against blind people, but that's just it's unrealistic. You can't have a guy in charge of engineering that's missing one fifth of his census,

Ben:

Yeah, but he had other senses to offset.

Gene:

that's just bullshit. That's, that's just woke ideology. Bullshit.

Ben:

Wow. I mean, there's a lot of bullshit

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, it's one thing if you cut your finger off in a you know, in an accident and you, you, you got nine fingers and you could still do your job. It's a whole other thing when you're in engineering and you're blind.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

Like, how's he type on the keyboard?

Ben:

well, there are blind people who type on keyboards.

Gene:

Yeah, but they're not engineers, are they?

Ben:

I don't know. They, they may exist

Gene:

I don't think so. Anyway. So that was a good change, I thought. But so that was their way of introducing Scotty.

Ben:

It was, which is going to be fantastic to have. I just cut. Cut.

Gene:

Yeah. This, the accent sounded pretty, pretty damn good. I don't know what the character looks like, what the actor looks like. The guy that plays Spock doesn't look super much like Nemoy, but his temperament and, and voice is really good. Yeah. Like he's really picked up on the the way that Nemoy played Spock,

Ben:

absolutely.

Gene:

and he is another tall, skinny dude. It's just his face just looks different, that's all.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

What else? Well, I, I don't know. Pike's, the, the guy who plays Pike is playing a perfect

Ben:

very absolutely. Well, while he's not so

Gene:

I think he is. He, he's doing a great job of playing that.

Ben:

well, but I mean, he's not screwing every alien that he walks across though.

Gene:

Okay. Well, if this show wasn't as vocal as it is then I, I think he would be. But I think he, he probably sat and watched every episode to really kind of train himself on the the way that the original James C. Kirk was played and

Ben:

He definitely has that, that abrasive swagger.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. I, I think he's doing a good job. He's one of those guys that like, knows that women want him. He may not be screwing everybody, but he does have that attitude in the.

Ben:

he, he, he has the confidence. Yes.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly. And he is got good hair. You gotta gotta give him that.

Ben:

Yeah, yeah. The, the BDE e you know, as it were, nothing. It's a reference to a different show that you don't watch.

Gene:

Oh.

Ben:

By the way, you should totally watch solar opposites at some

Gene:

I haven't even heard of that. What channel is that on?

Ben:

It's on Hulu. It's a Hulu original, and it's,

Gene:

No, I'm not gonna watch that. I'm not signing up for another network.

Ben:

dude, it's so funny. It is so funny. It's the, it is Rick and Morty in a totally different vein. It's very, very funny.

Gene:

I'm, I'm gonna start cutting down that, increasing the networks that I'm paying for. It's just such a waste of money.

Ben:

Well, we, we have Hulu for our cable subscription, essentially, and you know, it works out. But yeah,

Gene:

Yeah. You also have kids, so you need a babysitter. I get it.

Ben:

I, I do not like using the TV as a babysitter in any way, shape, or form. Thank you very much. I actually that, that is a continual argument because I don't think the TV should be on very often throughout the day. As a kid, I had a limit on how much TV I could watch, and I kind of think it worked out pretty well.

Gene:

I honestly don't understand why anybody would even have any televisions at all. You got so much stuff on YouTube right now. You literally spend your entire life just watching YouTube.

Ben:

Yeah. Well,

Gene:

There's cat shows, there's snake shows, there's different reptile

Ben:

City. Yeah,

Gene:

there's political shows, there's military shows. There's Tim Cast shows. I mean, there's just Chicken City. Yeah, exactly. There's so much stuff to watch. Why would you even need to pay? In fact, I'm gonna cancel my subs as we're recording now.

Ben:

so my son loves,

Gene:

don't need fucking Showtime. I don't need H V O.

Ben:

so my son loves watching construction equipment and stuff like that. What I will, what I will say is that what you have to be careful on, on YouTube is, you know, auto play. What's the next video? What, what the content is. It is definitely something that has to be monitored. It's not something you can just turn on and walk away.

Gene:

Why?

Ben:

what do you mean? Why?

Gene:

Well, would I, I don't understand what the, cause usually it picks a pretty good content for the next one too.

Ben:

Well, yeah, well, it, it may or may not be appropriate for a child, though

Gene:

Yeah. YouTube. Do you have,

Ben:

the normal YouTube,

Gene:

I've never seen anything on YouTube that isn't appropriate for a child.

Ben:

okay, well I'll just say this,

Gene:

Give me an example.

Ben:

Blippy.

Gene:

Never seen. I guess it's, I've not recommended blip.

Ben:

Okay. Yeah. Blippy is a construction kids show ala peewee earnest in lots of ways, and as equally inappropriate as peewee earnest was, in my opinion.

Gene:

What's a pv? Earnest?

Ben:

Peewee earnest. You don't know peewee earnest.

Gene:

No, you mean pv Herman

Ben:

There you go. Whatever. Well, yeah, sure. I, I don't know. It's something I didn't watch as a kid. Peewee Herman. Yeah, there you go.

Gene:

It's an adult program. It's not for kids.

Ben:

weird. Yes, exactly. And then you have miss Sarah in her programming, which she's not bad and she does a lot of sing longs and is kindergarten teacher esque, but then she has this non-binary friend on some of the videos that

Gene:

Hmm.

Ben:

I take issue with that I don't particularly want

Gene:

tell the kid that that's an example of who you beat up at school. You gotta learn who to target. They're, they're teaching you that on YouTube.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, anyway, so there's just some stuff that's out there. Then you have the ELs agate issue that popped up a few years ago that YouTube

Gene:

ban all Disney programs. Disney's eel. They're literally satanic, even if you're an atheist.

Ben:

a Don't disagree. Okay. And.

Gene:

Okay. But I, I don't, I've never seen a Disney thing on YouTube.

Ben:

Well, so the ELs agate issue on YouTube was AI generated stuff that really got pretty horrific, pretty quick. And it was one of those things that parents ended up finding because they left it on autoplay for their kids and walk in and all of a sudden their kids are seeing some things that they would rather not have their kids see.

Gene:

like what kind of things

Ben:

There was sexual activity stuff. There

Gene:

on YouTube?

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

I have never seen that on YouTube. I mean, I wouldn't mind seeing that on YouTube. I just, I

Ben:

just Google ELs agate, and you'll see what I'm talking about. It's,

Gene:

yeah. Now you're, now you got me interested.

Ben:

yeah. Anyway, YouTube is not a safe space for kids, but neither is Disney, you know, in Disney

Gene:

No, Disney's definitely not. I mean, all I'm seeing in El Gate is basically the the sex education program from that school in Chicago. What's the problem?

Ben:

Yeah. How, how to insert that dude that that was,

Gene:

method of putting lube on

Ben:

Dude, the fact that he was in this, for people who don't know project Veritas caught a school administrator talking ab

Gene:

Let's call him what he is.

Ben:

Okay. Absolutely agree with you there. There is no way that, I mean, so when you first watch the video, you think he's talking just about high schoolers, but then you realize that their sex education program goes into elementary school.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

It, it is absolutely abhorrent. And where, where are the cops? Why are the cops not taking action on this video? And the school stood by

Gene:

they want. Yeah. Yeah. It's, it's clearly a a groomer school where parents send their kids that they want to be predated

Ben:

I mean, so

Gene:

who, who's ultimately responsible for the children.

Ben:

the parents

Gene:

Yeah. They're paying money to the school,

Ben:

this private school.

Gene:

so it's not that expensive, but still it's significant enough and they're paying money for the school to have their children be subjected to this.

Ben:

Yeah. I think most people would think$40,000 a year is a lot for a private school gene, but you

Gene:

If you send your kids to a private school, that's actually probably average right now. I mean, most people send their kids to public school, which is free, but

Ben:

No, it's

Gene:

friends I have that send their kids to private school, yeah. It's in, it's in the 30 to 70,000 a year range.

Ben:

Yeah. This is why homeschooling.

Gene:

Oh, yeah.

Ben:

fantastic option.

Gene:

Yeah. I

Ben:

here, here's the deal. If you wanna teach your kid how to use certain adult objects like dildos and butt plugs and things like that, that's on you. I just don't think the school should be doing it. And I don't think that I don't think that that should be a thing.

Gene:

kids ought to be learning this stuff the way that they have been for Millennia,

Ben:

Trial

Gene:

by finding magazines in their parents' closets or garages. That's how you learn these things, not at school.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, you may learn it at school, just not from a teacher,

Gene:

Well, fair enough. Fair enough. Exactly. It shouldn't be coming from a teacher. It shouldn't be coming from a drag queen.

Ben:

which they literally brought in.

Gene:

is it, could this guy have looked any more gay? And I mean that in a stereotyping of 1970s gay porn. Gay.

Ben:

I didn't watch 1970s gay porn. Gay, so I don't know.

Gene:

missed out. Let me just say, you had some amazing gay porn back in the seventies. Anyway, this

Ben:

interesting. We learn something new about Gene every time.

Gene:

Well, Gene's been around for a few years longer than you, that's for sure. This guy looks like

Ben:

I just, I'm, I'm not the kind of guy who's gonna watch gay porn. It's just not, not gonna do anything for.

Gene:

Well, it's not about watching gay porn. It's about going to a club that has a gay porn.

Ben:

I, I don't think that's a club that I would,

Gene:

Damn. Most good clubs had gay porn playing back in the day, man. Back when people were less worried about things. Anyway the, this dude looks like Mr. Potato Head first of all. And it's like the, if you, you remember, okay, here's the best. Anybody that's ever watched South Park. Think of Mr. Slave, the character in South

Ben:

yes, yes.

Gene:

dude in Chicago, the pedophile literally is Mr. Slave.

Ben:

You're just ignorant.

Gene:

He's got a I might be, but that's what he looks like. It. It is. Okay. Yeah. Mr. I've never watched gay porn. Okay.

Ben:

I've watched South

Gene:

do you call South Park Been promoting the gay agenda now for 25 years. Come on.

Ben:

ah, no.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. How many gay references does South Park had? Like hundreds of thousands or millions.

Ben:

Millions.

Gene:

Uhhuh. Exactly. So they'll don't pretend to be all innocent here.

Ben:

Oh God. What was the

Gene:

They're literally teaching about inserting things.

Ben:

Ti Winks,

Gene:

Oh, the hamster. Yeah. Uhhuh the Richard Gear joke sitting in waiting to get utilized here.

Ben:

yes.

Gene:

In the green room. rich Richard. Gear joke in the green room. Yeah. Elsa with a dildo. That looks pretty hot.

Ben:

Jesus.

Gene:

sorry, I'm just you got me on watching these comics now. Anyway this dude literally looks like Mr. Slave save mustache, same haircut. It's almost like one was modeled on the other

Ben:

Well, I mean, it may be his aspiration.

Gene:

or something. Yeah, I mean, it's, it's incredible. Now, if this dude manages to keep his job,

Ben:

Well, the school's backing him

Gene:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. School is backing him up. But I guess that's the question, right? Should a school be allowed to have pedophiles teaching things like this to minors, like how to engage in, in anal

Ben:

I don't think as schools should employ pedophiles in

Gene:

Well, fair enough. But if it's a private institution and the parents are all for it, like they want their kids to, you know, be involved in getting trained on this stuff. If they're, if the parents themselves are groomers and the school is full of groomers, is that okay? Because you're the one who brought up this idea that people in different states ought to be able to do whatever they want. We need to reduce the federal government to a level where federal laws don't really apply.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

So sh is Chicago, the state of Chicago is, are they okay with having this be the cultural norm in their state or is there such thing as national standards and laws that should enter into this and prevent them from being able to have a school like that? Even if the local community is all for it,

Ben:

No. So if the local community

Gene:

are the rights of the child more important than the rights of the state?

Ben:

They're not, the rights of the parent are more important. The child

Gene:

So a parent who is a abusing their children

Ben:

that sucks for that kid,

Gene:

continue to do that indefinitely until they're

Ben:

that sucks for that kid. But parental rights have been eroded too much. The opposite side of this is

Gene:

was that email again, Ben at?

Ben:

Dude at named ben.com

Gene:

that name bend that cam.

Ben:

what it comes down to is parental rights have been eroded to the point where you have in California, if a child says, Hey, I'm trans, and the parents do nothing. Affirm it. If they say, well, honey, I think you're confused, or Son, let's talk about this or do anything. But other than affirm it, that child can be taken away from the parents, their genitals, mutilated and, you know, put on a sterilization program. I don't think that's okay. I don't think it's okay for a parent to abuse their child. But where do you cross that line? Where do you say that line exists? Is spanking a child abuse?

Gene:

so this is an interesting question for me to ask somebody who is a parent if it's a competition between parent parental rights and the rights of a child who's not an adult yet, where do you draw that line? Like, how far can parents torture their child before the state interferes?

Ben:

So here's the thing. We have laws around assault. We have laws around you know, and, and I would say that most, in most jurisdictions, spanking could be considered assault. I don't think spanking is assault. I think it is a necessary implement for a, I'm

Gene:

you're, you're, you're skirting the question.

Ben:

no, no. I, I'm getting there. I think that it is a fine line that has to be drawn by the community that you're in on what is socially acceptable. I don't know that it is for the government to do. And the reason why I say this is, you know, if a man beat his wife back in the day, people might look aside because, oh, well she's this, that, or the other. But if a man, but if a man was really doing some harm or doing something egregious, you know, her brother and her dad would probably go tar and feather the dude and run him out of town. So I, I think that there has to be the social element of keeping each other in check and saying what is egregious and what is not. But you know, you have to give parental rights their due. You, you have to because the other option is clearly not going to work

Gene:

Okay. So you seem to be pretty much a universalist in this and parents have complete rights to do whatever they want to their kids. So then

Ben:

within reason.

Gene:

why is

Ben:

you can't kill your kid

Gene:

Why not?

Ben:

because that's another human life. And human life is sacrosanct

Gene:

Well, but if they have full control of their kids and their choices to kill their kids, why would that somehow something interfere with that?

Ben:

because you're ending a life that you know, that's not, and I don't think

Gene:

so you're okay with living in hell, but you're not okay with death. Like somebody can just be torturing their kid for 18 years, raping him every day, and we've seen

Ben:

No, I don't think that that would be

Gene:

a number of places. Okay, so that's what I'm trying to get you to get to is where do you draw the line between

Ben:

I'm saying

Gene:

the rights of the individual?

Ben:

that is a hard line to draw

Gene:

That's why I'm asking. If it was an easy one, I wouldn't be asking.

Ben:

again is spanking abuse. Let's start there.

Gene:

I

Ben:

Can it be Absolutely.

Gene:

it can be, but it generally is not.

Ben:

Okay, so, but we already have a fuzzy line there, right? Dad gets drunk and beats the shit outta me with his belt. That's abuse. That's not okay.

Gene:

because of what? Because of the drinking?

Ben:

No, not because of the training, because of the abuse. It doesn't matter what the

Gene:

it's the drinking.

Ben:

Okay? This goes down to drunk driving. Okay? Great example. I get in a car wreck and I kill someone. What does it matter? If I am dead tired because I've been up for 24 hours or I'm drunk, the reason doesn't matter. The fact is I

Gene:

I think it does, because I think when you drink and then you get in the car, you're accepting a higher risk than you are if you're not drunk. It's an issue of acceptance of risk. So if you're I mean, by the way, this I think is the only reason that there ought to be a distinction between drunk driving and regular driving is because it, it is, it is not like it's beyond reasonable doubt that everybody understands that drinking alcohol or utilizing other substances that are mine altering impairs you and your abilities to drive. Now, for some people, they can say, well, I drive just fine when I'm drunk. And that could be totally true. However, you have to agree that even in that scenario, even in you driving fine while you're drunk, you're driving worse while you're drunk than you are if you're completely sober. So by drinking and then getting behind the wheel of a car, you're accepting the higher risk and accepting that higher risk, and then resulting in actual injury or fatality should have a higher punishment.

Ben:

Okay, then if you accept the risk of driving while tired, should that not also have a higher

Gene:

Totally, yes. And in a lot of states, there's no distinction placed between. Driving tired or driving under a prescription medication or driving under influence of alcohol, all of them will get you the same. Driving under influence charge.

Ben:

Well, in, in some states that may be true, but in a lot it's not. So I, I think there's a distinction. The point of all of this is where you draw the lines and what is it so socially and morally acceptable. You know, again, it beating your child. Is that wrong? Yes. Is spanking your child wrong? No. Okay. How, who de who decides to define that? That's where parental rights need to be aired. On the side of caution. On, because otherwise what you have is airing on the side of the child and then you end up saying spanking is wrong.

Gene:

For parents?

Ben:

permits are not a no, just n no.

Gene:

everyone who's a parent qualified to be a parent?

Ben:

Yes, because the driver's license really says how good you're gonna drive

Gene:

Should a five-year-old be allowed to drive

Ben:

on the farm. Sure.

Gene:

on a public road?

Ben:

Allowed is a squishy word. Should there be a, should there be a prohibition preventing the parents from saying, here drive? I don't know.

Gene:

Okay. Should a a brothel that specializes in children be allowed?

Ben:

No, because a child cannot consent.

Gene:

What if their parents consent to the children working in the brothel?

Ben:

mean, okay, so

Gene:

Because that's what we're talking about in Chicago. This is a school that presumably has parents that consent to this education, quote unquote.

Ben:

yeah, I, I don't think that a parent should be able to consent for something like that. Now then you get into the idea of, you know, not that long ago that teenagers were you had consent laws for marriage where a parent could consent for a 12, 13 year old to go get married to someone of a drastically different age group. You know, I mean, these are some not easily answered questions.

Gene:

Absolutely. They're not supposed to be easily answered, but what the point I'm getting to here is that I don't, I'm certainly not an absolutist, but again, I'm also not a parent, but I'm not an absolutist on the parental rights thing. I think that in most cases, the default should be the parental right. But I also think that there's a shit ton of idiots in this country, over half the population, and I wouldn't trust them to raise a kid to save their.

Ben:

it,

Gene:

how do you balance those two things?

Ben:

E easily you allow it to work itself out.

Gene:

The way it works out is with children that are abused.

Ben:

And my point would be that a law is not going to stop that, and a law is more likely to cause harm to the well-meaning parent. It's like gun control. You're, you're, you're punishing the law abiding citizen, not the person who's gonna break the law.

Gene:

So is it a punishing, a law abiding citizen to say that schools should not be allowed to have dildos in class

Ben:

Well,

Gene:

anywhere in the country? In any school? Private republic.

Ben:

I don't think the federal government has the authority to intervene in that.

Gene:

Okay. All right. Well, that's what I'm trying to uncover is where, where do

Ben:

can a state or a community say, Hey, yeah, we don't want this? Sure. Absolutely. Can they affirm that they do want it? Sadly, I would say that if you want to be not a moral relativist, but a, you know, intellectually consistent Yeah. People should have the ability to say, we want pedophiles teaching our children. Do I think that would

Gene:

Branch Davidians and the number of Mormon groups in Arizona have had their children removed and been threatened and fact had FBI killing people as a result of. For exactly those reasons. Child welfare.

Ben:

Yeah, and I don't think that's okay. This is why I think you err on the side of the parent, not on the side of the child.

Gene:

But it's very selective.

Ben:

It is agreed.

Gene:

And I don't like selective. I want there to be a clear distinction here.

Ben:

Well, then, you know, go run the FBI

Gene:

Well, I think the FBI is not gonna be around for much longer the way things are going their way now.

Ben:

I hope and pray that is the case. But yeah, the F B I has definitely been very selective on

Gene:

I mean, it's, it's, it's almost comical to say the FBI's reputation has been tarnished, given the reputation of the fbi. But I think at this point it's pretty obvious from the Twitter feeds that the FBI reputation has been tarnished.

Ben:

Well, you know, last episode I was saying, you know, we didn't have any evidence that the FBI was

Gene:

we do now.

Ben:

directly involved. Yeah, exactly. We sure as fuck do now l l absolute incontrovertible evidence that the FBI was

Gene:

Yeah. They were

Ben:

US

Gene:

picking people in elections. Absolutely.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

Yep.

Ben:

So what do you think the in-state of this is going to be

Gene:

French Revolution.

Ben:

Short of that, what do you think we're gonna get out of this?

Gene:

A prelude to the French Revolution.

Ben:

You,

Gene:

think there's any other, I don't think there's any other, well, I mean, you could, you could say, well, we're probably gonna have nuclear war even before that happens. So there, there are a number of different timeline possibilities here. None of them, what I would say classically end well for the us

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

So take your pick French style revolution in the US nuclear war, in the US Chinese occupation of the us.

Ben:

China's not gonna occupy the us

Gene:

and that's exactly why they're gonna do it because too many people think what you just said,

Ben:

I, I mean, they occupying the US

Gene:

they have the population for it. They can literally have two police for every one US citizen in this country.

Ben:

They can't mobilize them.

Gene:

What, what do you mean they can't mobilize them?

Ben:

China does not have the Navy to move that many people.

Gene:

Oh my God. They will have our navy

Ben:

Why will they have our Navy

Gene:

because they're gonna, well, if they're gonna occupy the US that means they've won the war and have taken the, and now can take over the full country.

Ben:

Yeah. I I, I,

Gene:

The US Navy doesn't do shit, dude. It's way over like Navy mattered 200 years ago. It doesn't matter.

Ben:

it absolutely matters right

Gene:

Nope.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

In the day of hypersonic missiles that can be launched from anywhere in the planet to hit any other place in the planet, the Navy is irrelevant.

Ben:

So do you think the army is irrelevant then?

Gene:

Army is still somewhat relevant until drones become more prevalent, and eventually, yes, the army will be irrelevant. The drones will replace the Army missiles, replace the Navy, drones replaced the Army.

Ben:

Hmm. So no need to ever extend the arm of your military forces, just use your remote weapons.

Gene:

Did people not learn anything out of the first Star Wars movie? What you need is to have a large force of drones that can be utilized anywhere in the galaxy.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

is how you, this is how you maintain power.

Ben:

I don't know, man. I

Gene:

that's pretty obvious to me. No, it, there's, there's no reason in my opinion, to be trying to train expensive heart to grow human beings for dangerous jobs. What you need is to be focused on building technological solutions to those things, and that includes the military and. in the military, how is it a bad thing if you have zero casualties of humans on your side and the other side has millions of people dead? How's that a bad thing?

Ben:

Well, it's just not a realistic thing.

Gene:

I give it a couple years.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, you know, so we've gone through many revolutions in warfare. You know, when you had the armored tonight the foot soldier of the club was, couldn't match'em. And then you had the invention of gun powder and it's this back and forth cycle. And the drones are very much a advantage to the state, which is not good. Generally when you have freedom is when there is equality in arms between the state and the citizen. We are getting, you know, far past that and, you know, if you get the eye of Soar on, on you as one YouTuber puts it, you're, you're host. It's about avoiding that. So, you know, it, it, it is a thing to say that there is a arms disparity that is happening, but I don't think it's total yet.

Gene:

Yeah. But you, okay, so there's two things here. One is there is internal conflict, and two, there's external conflict. So I'm talking about external conflict.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

You're talking about internal conflict as far as

Ben:

not necessarily talking about just internal conflict. I mean, I, I think that, you know, many, many thousands of people died in their Iraq in Afghanistan due to what I'm talking about.

Gene:

What?

Ben:

Just the technological disparity.

Gene:

Well, there's a lot fewer people. A lot fewer Americans died in Iraq and Afghanistan than Iraqis and the Afghans.

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

Like, I'm not saying that was a, that was a good thing. I'm not saying that was a just war, but but the US utilized more technology. Was that not a good thing? Would you have preferred more on the ground troops be there and hence die?

Ben:

Well, I think we would've ended up blowing up fewer weddings and get togethers.

Gene:

a wedding or two? As long as it's not on this country,

Ben:

I don't know. I, I guess either human life is sacrosanct and universally

Gene:

all human life identically, sac sanc?

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

No. The life of your enemy is always worth less. It cannot be worth the same, because if it was worth the same, then you are guaranteed to lose because your enemy does not believe that your life is worth the same as their life.

Ben:

Okay. So if we're talking in a war,

Gene:

will always win.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

Because they have no, no illusions about the lives of their enemies being worth the same as their lives.

Ben:

so the question immediately becomes, are you better than other people?

Gene:

If you're not, you have no business trying to lead.

Ben:

So this gets into an argument that I have all the time with a certain set of people. It depends on what you mean by better, right? If you mean,

Gene:

do you mean by certain people? You mean Jews?

Ben:

Not at all. Actually.

Gene:

Because I'm getting a little yay action going on here from you.

Ben:

no. Well, what the hell man? Not at all. No, actually with my wife. So am I smarter than someone that can be objectively measured? So there's something there? Am I better, am I more conscientious? Am I this, I'm

Gene:

You're smarter, you're physically stronger, you're younger. I mean, what the hell, man?

Ben:

There are things that can be measured

Gene:

Clearly you are the guy that that's in charge.

Ben:

yeah, anyway, does that mean that my life has more value than anyone else's? And you know, in the West, the right answer is no. No,

Gene:

the hell?

Ben:

each and every human being is unique and sovereign, and there is no one else. And this is what people need to realize. You can have all these objective things, but no human being will ever be another. And therefore, because rarity is a measure of value, humans are infinitely valuable because they're

Gene:

it's not the only measure of value. In fact, it's a minor measure of value. And unfortunately, the the, the woosters out there are trying to procreate this myth that rarity is the main measure of value. It really isn't. It? It doesn't matter that much. Here's the thing to the state, the value of all its citizens has to be equal to an each individual person. You would be a fool to think that all lives are equal. The lives of your children should be at the very pinnacle of value. The lives of your spouse probably come after that, the lives of your relatives, and then your own life, and then the lives of your neighbors. And then finally, you know, people you've never met.

Ben:

Yeah. I, it's so in my view of marriage, your spouse comes first and then the

Gene:

Oh, hell

Ben:

responsibility and

Gene:

You can, you can get rid of your spouse. Your children have to last.

Ben:

No. Your children will eventually exit your life and

Gene:

children are the only reason that you have a spouse. You, your program to procreate in order to pass on those genetics. And by the way, 68% of the US population is divorced. So the value of a spouse not very high.

Ben:

Okay. I, I have a slightly different view on marriage than I think the majority of the population. So

Gene:

Well, I, yeah, I think you do. And then, you know, when you get divorced, we'll have a different conversation and you'll have a different view.

Ben:

I yeah. Hope to avoid that.

Gene:

Yeah. Well, I would, I would much rather wish you a happy life than the married life.

Ben:

I, I, I think they're

Gene:

They're not mutually exclusive. I'm not trying to say they are. I'm, I'm just saying that some people stay married for the sake of marriage, not for the sake of happiness.

Ben:

Oh, fair enough.

Gene:

And,

Ben:

do that.

Gene:

yeah. And I was perfectly fine being married and, and dealing with all the downsides as well. And then one of my ex-wife freed me from that. I, I was quite elated, and happy to be divorced. But anyway, we're getting sidetracked. The, we're talking about the value of life and I think. It sounds very nice to say that all life matters and everybody's unique and important and has equal value, but that is literally counter to, to really all animals, which we are in the way that we deal with things that, that, that is countering the idea of hierarchies existing and hierarchies absolutely exist. And for good reason. We need to have different values placed on different relationships and on different outcomes. And to do that, we have to not have everyone's value be identical.

Ben:

yeah, so I think what we're disagreeing on here is semantics. So I think that there is a fundamental base level of value that is different than objective and scenario based. So if we say, does human life generically have value? I think the answer is yes. Are there people that I value more than others? The answer is also, yes. Are there people that I think are more valuable to society than others? I think the answer is yes. So I I, I think that there's a difference there that has to

Gene:

agreed with me on all three of those. So what, where's the counterpoint then?

Ben:

Because I'm saying that there has to be a universal value for life, that life has to be valuable by its innate set.

Gene:

Well, life is more valuable than lack of life.

Ben:

So if we are talking generally about,

Gene:

that's dead.

Ben:

unless we are talking specifically, all life has equal value,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

and then you can get into the specifics is all I'm saying.

Gene:

but that's a silly statement. Say all life has equally value. It doesn't, life as a concept has a higher value than not life,

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

but within things that are alive, they all have different values. So a rock has less value than a baby goat who's cute and bouncing around.

Ben:

So the point

Gene:

goat has less value than the human.

Ben:

okay,

Gene:

the human I know has less value than the human. I don't know.

Ben:

here's the deal. I'm avoiding the identity politics. I'm saying that the right level of analysis to say who's better, who's whatever is the individual, because you cannot do it at the group level. As soon as you go to the group level, you have to say equal.

Gene:

Literally what I said to the government, all, all life of humans that are part of that country should be identical, should be equal. equal under the law, right?

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

to each individual human, there ought to be a difference between their valuation of every other human's life for a multitude of reasons.

Ben:

And I think that happens naturally. So

Gene:

you can have you don't need identity politics to think that way. Like identity politics would then simply be saying as a shortcut, I'm gonna say that Jews run Hollywood, therefore they don't really, they're evil and their lives matter less. Like, okay, but that's for that particular person. They're using the shortcut of Jews in order to group everybody that has some similarity traits as having a lesser value. But that, that's for them. That the danger is in the government having that kind of mentality.

Ben:

and I think when we've seen the government have that kind of mentality, we've seen the genocides of the 20th century.

Gene:

Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. But if you don't demonize your enemy, you will lose. And that's just the truism. And it's, it's always been true. It always will be true. It's the reason that every time the US has been involved in any kind of military, There's always been some kind of ESTs about the people that were fighting where it was the the GOs in the Korean War towel heads when in the Middle Eastern wars you know, you pick, pick whatever epitaph you want to call the group that you're currently opposing. If you don't do that, if you humanize the opposition, you will lose.

Ben:

So how does a woke society ever win?

Gene:

It doesn't, that's why the US is collapsing. That's why the only thing that can possibly happen here is a French style revolution. There is no other alternative here other than nuclear weapons or Chinese occupation.

Ben:

and if that were to happen and we were to, let's say, overthrow the culture that we currently have,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

then what

Gene:

Well then again, you, you can't humanize that position. You're gonna have to deal with the people that you overthrew in a less human way.

Ben:

do you think the American public has the stomach for?

Gene:

I'd say 10% do,

Ben:

Is that enough?

Gene:

yes. How many, how many people were actually actively involved in the US Revolut.

Ben:

Less than

Gene:

number, but I know it's pretty damn low.

Ben:

Less than 3%. That's the whole three percenter

Gene:

that's the percent that had the guts for it. What were

Ben:

I don't know that that's

Gene:

trying to overthrow a government that had gotten them to the place they were at.

Ben:

Yeah. But there's a big difference when you start talking about fifth generational warfare and the way modern society is going to receive that.

Gene:

Modern Society's done. I mean, that's, that's the one thing. It's by the time that we have a French style revolution in this country you're not going to be ordering Uber food to deliver your groceries for you. That's, that will have already disappeared. You're gonna be much more akin to the Soviet Union in the 1970s where when you walk into the grocery store, you're not there to, with a list of things to buy, you're there to buy the things that are available on the shelves.

Ben:

well, you know, if the railroad strike happens, then we very well may get there.

Gene:

be a nice little test. I think the guy that they're gonna flip around on that, I think they'll give the railroad people everything they're asking for eventually after the strike happens.

Ben:

Well, I, I, they've already pushed forward a bill to basically make it illegal for them to strike, which I think is hilarious because Yeah, exactly. How are you gonna stop a group of people from just saying, I got sick

Gene:

yeah, exactly.

Ben:

you'll, you'll end up with the way police strike and everything else. You'll have the blue flu sort of,

Gene:

And by the way, I don't think that we oughta have unions. I think unions are a horrible concept, but I also think that disorganized strikes are perfectly fine. It's the organization aspect of it that I don't like because it breeds corruption,

Ben:

Yeah, I, I, I

Gene:

to be able to make use of their, you know, personal time and vacation time and whatever time. And if that also happens to coincide in order to get a point across, I have no problem with that.

Ben:

so. I, I have, I, I think unions serve a purpose. I think that they should be temporary, not permanent. I think they should come together for whatever cause is needed and then dissolve afterwards.

Gene:

yeah. Like a Canadian trucker thing was a perfect example of what could be classified as a union action,

Ben:

Yes, yes. Good

Gene:

and then they all got punished for it.

Ben:

Hoo boy did they.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. and, and including by this country, as the more information comes out.

Ben:

Well, this country definitely worked with Trudeau and the Canadian government to punish the Canadian truckers.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Like they weren't, they, they were tracking those truckers based on data from Canada and preventing them from crossing into the us, which a lot of them, that's literally their job is to haul shit from the US to Canada

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

and to, to haul Canadian products, which are not made in the US like no oil. So, yeah, it, it's what?

Ben:

I, I'm just trying to see where you're going with this.

Gene:

Oh no, where, where I'm going with it is that I, in a lot of ways, like, you wanna try and be optimistic and think, well, the elections and next time round they're gonna change things, whatever. But I, I think just statistically it, it, it is, we're in the downfall of the us. There's no two ways about it. Electing a different president isn't gonna change things. Electing a different Congress isn't gonna change things. The wheels have been put into motion a long time ago, and they've been accelerated greatly by Covid. And the last elections, the last two elections at this point, not just the last elections. So. Before you can reverse course, you need to spend a tremendous amount of energy stopping the movement in a particular direction. And I think at this point it ain't gonna happen.

Ben:

Well, I, the, so one of the things that everyone should be painfully clear on is the deep state is a real thing, and the politicians that are elected are not nearly as important as the bureaucracy that is underneath. And that that is the problem.

Gene:

the F B I and I'm sure they weren't the only ones, or basically the ones that elect the politicians.

Ben:

yes. And so what, what you would have to do is break free of that. And the only way to do that is to tear down the entire system.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yep. French style revolution. Literally been saying it. Now, what comes out of

Ben:

as

Gene:

I'm, I'm very like I don't have a good lens into what comes out of that.

Ben:

Well, I mean, it's terrifying. I mean, the US Revolution, we got very lucky that we did not end up with

Gene:

That was a mostly peaceful revolution

Ben:

yes. Mostly peaceful

Gene:

to the next one. Absolutely.

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

half the US population.

Ben:

You're that black, black pill on it.

Gene:

It's not a black pill. I'm a, I'm a statistician. I'm, I'm predicting things based on their current paths

Ben:

Okay. And why do you think it will be half? I mean, that is a drastic number.

Gene:

because it's, it's not a revolution. It is a religious war.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

Both sides,

Ben:

Focusing on what, what it's, what, what is going to be the clarion call

Gene:

Well, both sides believe in their cause beyond simple reason.

Ben:

and what are those sites as you see it?

Gene:

Well, the two sides are pretty fucking obvious, and they're drifting further and further apart. It's people that see their democracy and then the other side as being the one trying to kill their democracy.

Ben:

I, I, I think that the sides are much more a constitutional republic and a you know, democracy being the dividing line. So, I don't know. I, I, I think that we have.

Gene:

You know, 99% of the US population couldn't even describe what a constitutional republic is. So I think you're, you're talking about a. A description that most people wouldn't even know what

Ben:

Do you think it's that bad? I don't think it's

Gene:

Absolutely. Dude, I, I think you're, well, you're the one half the time sending me sending me information based on or about conversations that you've heard in the company that you work for. Look like you don't think that given an opportunity that people will be happy to get rid of others that they dislike. Do you, did you forget all the people that lost their jobs as a result of Covid?

Ben:

Oh, well, no, I did not. And it, it's astonishing to me some of the people who literally, their job is risk analysis and they do a very poor job of it in their own life. So,

Gene:

blind spots? Yeah.

Ben:

yeah, and I, I absolutely understand that, but

Gene:

Well, that's true of me too. Dude. That wouldn't be a fat dude if I was better at you know, I, like, I don't, I don't ignore the facts that being overweight reduces your or increases mortality risk. It reduces your, your length of life. But like knowing that intellectually and actually doing something about it are two different.

Ben:

a hundred percent. But you know, when people know something intellectually and do something, Quite the opposite, so I, I guess it's the same thing, but I, I don't know.

Gene:

No, it is, it's totally the same thing. But I think in this context what I'm referring to is that the first phase is an uptick in increase in violence due to you know, typical normal crimes like robbery becomes more armed robbery, burglary becomes more armed, burglary, and a certain percentage of the population will start taking things into their own hands. So that, I think that's the first wave of this French style revolution is a general uptick in violence. And I think it's going to be, it's already started, but it's gonna keep increasing in the places where where the left side has been the most successful. Chicago, LA, San Francisco, New York,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

places like that. The, not say that there won't be any violence in Iowa, but you know, it'll be a lot less predominant than it is in places like that. But, The, the end result that you're gonna have is people that will be willing to defend themselves, and then the rest, which we could just label as the the sheep and the sheeps will end up being led to the slaughterhouse. Because if you can't defend yourself, you're, you're showing to the people that just don't place human value higher. We were talking about human value in the past. People that are gonna be stealing your stuff while holding a gun, place a higher value on your stuff than they do on your life. And if you're not willing to do anything about that, it's an easy trade. You'll lose both your life and your stuff. Initially. You'll just lose your stuff, but eventually you'll lose your life too.

Ben:

Well, and here, here's the thing. You have to be willing to, you have to be willing to stand up for your own life yourself and your principles. I don't know. I, I, I,

Gene:

Well, let me, let me continue on with the phases here.

Ben:

okay.

Gene:

That's phase one. When that happens, at some point it gets to the level that there's enough people complaining about it and talking about it, that the federal government will have to step. When the federal government steps in, they're gonna impose martial law, martial law because things have gotten so bad that that's the only way to do it. law will mean people will start being sealed up in their houses and not being

Ben:

go well.

Gene:

Well, it, it's going pretty well so far. And you know, there's a

Ben:

a revolution in China.

Gene:

Exactly that's what I'm talking about. So it's going pretty well. So that will be step two. And even though the government responds in the result to something that people want to have the government step in on, the government's gonna go away overboard of it. And it's gonna prompt other people, both in the places with those those new federal controlled territories and in places that don't have that yet to say things have gotten out of hand. Enough is enough. You know, it, this, this shit makes covid look like a cakewalk. And it's time for us to get rid of this government and bring in a new government. And that will be the formation of the I don't know what the name's gonna be. I, I'm not a time traveler here, even though most people think I am, but I'm really not. But it'll be something akin to. You know, the the true United States or it, it, it'll have some kind of a tieback to the original 13 colonies formation and how we need to restore things to get the United States back in line. But those people will, by territory represent maybe a large chunk, but by population will be in the minority, and certainly the active portion of people like that versus people that just sort of nod their heads and go, yeah, no, you're probably right. The active portion's gonna be 10% or less. And that will mean a dissolution of the United States as we've seen the breakup into autonomous zones, zones the side of the size of states, not the size of a couple blocks the way that they had in Portland, where the, the autonomous zones will effectively nullify US law and will say that their laws are supreme because the United States laws are no longer valid. And that will incidentally be on both sides. That will be on sides where they think that the United States is focused on the wrong things by not Doing, like for example, if there's a covid, by not having a federal mandate on shots, like that's a, that shows the weakness of the federal government and therefore the federal government doesn't really matter because they don't know what the fuck they're doing. And on the other side, you'll, you'll, you know, more like Texas and Florida where you have states saying, yeah, we're, we're not gonna follow federal regulations because they're stupid. And I think ultimately it's going to be much like it was in Russia or sorry, much like it was in the Soviet Union at the fall of the Soviet Union. A not completely but relatively peaceful dissolution of the federal government. And that's, I think when they, the real the real bloodbath is gonna start. Because once you have no federal government and each of the autonomous zones or territories that used to be states is its own government what you're gonna find is that totalitarianism in government really starts to take hold. When there's no risk of a federal force coming down on you, then the people that are in charge are gonna do everything they can to ensure that they stay in charge for a good long time.

Ben:

so this is where the

Gene:

Should I write a book? This sounds fun.

Ben:

as long as you keep it fantasy

Gene:

Oh, every, every, everything's section. Yeah.

Ben:

Yeah. This starts, you know, down the path of why the incorporation doctrine and getting rid of nullification as a means of redress grievances was such a bad idea. So, you know, the, the founders believed in nullification, meaning that state law could nullify federal law. And essentially what you're talking about is a enforced, going back to that

Gene:

Yep. Yeah, because I think that the threat of the federal government only exists so long as it's not actually challenged.

Ben:

as long as it has the ability to

Gene:

federal government can win against a hundred, a group of a hundred dudes, or four dudes or whatever, small groups every time a hundred percent of the time. What the federal government can't win against is something the size of a state.

Ben:

depends on the state, but Sure.

Gene:

Now, I don't think so. I think, I think it'd be even hard for'em to do that with state like Connecticut,

Ben:

why is that

Gene:

because the only thing to do that, the only thing the federal government can do at that point is an occupation,

Ben:

and

Gene:

and as soon as they do that,

Ben:

and the governor and everyone goes with it. But see,

Gene:

No, no, no, no. It doesn't even matter. But my point is that if a, if, if you have a group that's big enough, like not a branch of size group, but a, a group the size of a state, so a million population, a million plus, right? If you have a group of a million people that physically live in the same area that are opposed to the federal government, what is the federal government going to do? I think their only option is to occupy in martial law,

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

triggers events across the rest of the states, because a lot of states are already pissed off at the federal government, and if the federal government imposes martial law on Connecticut, there are a lot of other states that are going to not just declare support or, well, it's not even support for Connecticut. It's just a failure of the federal government at that point, and they're going to start declaring independence.

Ben:

we've seen this before. So Virginia declared it's a session when they were required to raise troops to put down the rebellion in South Carolina. They would not raise troops for that, but they joined with the other side. So I, I, I get the parallels and I get what you're saying. I just, I don't know that the people have as much power as you seem to think.

Gene:

Well, a again, it's, it doesn't require that much power. It's what it requires is the numbers, the numbers of people.

Ben:

Huh And why do you think the numbers make that big of a difference?

Gene:

I think the numbers make that big of a difference because the, the fear of countering the federal government only exists so long as the federal government doesn't show weakness. And the thing that the federal government can't do is to use purely fear with a large population. They can use purely fear for small populations, and they can even use violence against small populations like a hundred people or something, or a couple hundred people. But they

Ben:

think they can't do that? Against a million?

Gene:

because to do that against a million requires the use of a much larger force. The use of a much larger force comes from the rest of the country. The rest of the country has already a lot of states and will continue as more violence increases that I've been saying. That's the first prelude step is an increase in general violence. Will have a disable outlook towards the federal government to begin with. And everybody that's ever, you know, I'm, I'm using general blanket statements, so take'em for what they are. But everybody that's heard the phrase, they're building FEMA camps and rolled their eyes is gonna say, holy shit, Alex Jones was right.

Ben:

The Alex Jones was Right. Jar keeps getting bigger and bigger. Absolutely.

Gene:

Well, I'm sure he's not particularly happy about that either, but it's that's the thing, is it, it's a continuum. It's a path. Like there's no single moment that that creates a French style revolution. It's a bunch of dominoes falling, but much like dominoes, when one of them falls, the certainty of the next one falling is, may not be a hundred percent, but it's pretty damn close to 99. You know, there, there's a lot of these dominoes that already are standing up right now.

Ben:

Well, it, it's definitely where you can see a chain of events much like the avalanche building up speed and power to the point where it's not stoppable. But I would say that you also have the option and the possibility of stopping it early. And so you are assuming that that domino falls and there's not a hand there to prevent it from stopping and hit hitting the next one. So, so my question is, do you think that that is really, that inevitable or what be, because I, I can see

Gene:

I'm not sure what would prevent it. Right now. I'm not, I'm not saying it's 100% guaranteed. I just can't think of a I don't, I see a, a version of events moving forward that prevents it,

Ben:

Okay,

Gene:

it could exist. I'm just not seeing it.

Ben:

fair enough.

Gene:

Because I think that we've been going down this road for quite a while. And then what, what's really interesting is to be, you know, around a hundred years from now to see what the history books actually say about this. Because they, they will have a better way of tracing back, like, what were the pivotal events? Was nine 11 the Pivotal event, was it really a much bigger thing than people thought it was you know, a hundred years from now.

Ben:

Well, nine 11 was absolutely a pivotal event, and I, I don't see any way around that. I mean, the, you know, nine 11 when I was a kid, you know, my, my parents were very much on the inside job bandwagon and track far earlier than I was.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

You know, when, when I got the NT s, or not the NT S b but the NIST report and I started going through it, I was in college

Gene:

Yeah, I remember you told Yeah.

Ben:

yeah. You know, that that really did. I went from a teen who. You know, didn't wanna listen to his parents and nah, you can't be right to holy shit. You know, that Alex Res Alex Jones' right Jar was really a wake up call for me pretty early on. I think a lot of the things that are going on now are wake up calls for very much the next generation, you know, watching people, you know, like Luke Murkowski, he's been great for a long time. Tim's finally coming around to, you know, he, he's been a milk toast middleman for a long time, but he's finally starting to wake up and say, Hey, no, this is pretty egregious. And, you know, moving,

Gene:

Yeah. I'm, I'm starting to ban people that, that make fun of Tim on No Jones's social.

Ben:

Why?

Gene:

I'm just tired of hearing idiots that don't watch the show. Think it's just cute and funny to say, oh yeah, you mean that, that, you know, idiot and a beanie or whatever. Like, I don't have time for that shit.

Ben:

I mean,

Gene:

If you don't watch something, you, you're not allowed to tell me your opinion. You can have an opinion. You're not allowed to tell it to me.

Ben:

Okay. Whatever. I, I, I, I don't care either way. I, I actually have warmed

Gene:

as I do.

Ben:

no, not at all, because I don't, you know, I'm not responsible for half the fucking post on no

Gene:

I know, I That's statistically true.

Ben:

I you know, I've actually warmed up to Tim a lot because I think he is moving in the right direction. But you know, I, okay. He, he's waking up to things

Gene:

Tim is not perfect. He's not some kind of clarion or anything, but, but also he's been saying the right shit for a while and he's noticing things and it's kind of fun for me cuz he is obviously a lot younger than I am to see somebody start coming to the same conclusions that I've had for many, many years and and have a huge audience and therefore impact a lot more people to start thinking and seeing things the way that I've seen them. And the thing that I think I have in common with Tim that maybe other people don't is I'm not a conservative,

Ben:

well,

Gene:

know, I, I've been pushed into the conservative group by the movement of the left to communism, but I've, I've always been a libertarian. I've never had any issues with the issues that conservatives have historically had issues with, like abortion and. You know, gay people and slavery, like, all these things to me are like, no, that's, you know, that's an individual thing. I, I'm not, I don't need to impose morality on people. The only thing I need to do is look for a set of, of laws based on principles rather than on morality.

Ben:

Yeah. You know, it's interesting, you know, what

Gene:

And that's what, well, just to finish the thought, and that's kind of where Tim comes from, is he calls it, he's like a, a left wing libertarian. I would probably be more of a right wing libertarian, but, but they're, they're from the old Republican party of 20, 30 years ago. There's plenty of shit I disagreed with, but the way things are today, I would obviously be labeled a far rightwinger.

Ben:

Well, you know, it the definition of a conservative has definitely shifted a lot. I always considered myself a conservative in lots of ways, but very much in the libertarian vain. Very much more libertarian than anything else. I've never been a Republican. And I think there's a difference. So yeah, I, I, I am in the camp of leave me the hell alone and I'll leave you the hell alone and we can all be better. Absolutely. But that's, you know, that, that's not common. You, you, you

Gene:

and I don't care if there's gay porn playing in a club. I mean, you know, again, I'm not a fucking conservative.

Ben:

And I quite frankly don't either. I just may or may not choose to. Frequent set

Gene:

a funny thing to make fun of. I, I totally agree with that.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

You know, I'll, I'll make fun of that. But it's, it the, the number of people that are kind of coming around to seeing things that they're bad and like, oh my God, the, the elections are stolen and then they, they choose to support Ukraine and make fun of Tim Pool. I'm like, fuck it, you're done. You're not, you're not getting the news that I'm providing. You're not worth saving. You know, that's what it comes down to. It's sort of like, if there are people that are going to be preventing you from saving them,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

you know, I guess if you're like going down the whole Christian path, then you ought be saving them as well. Anyway. I ain't one of those either. Not Christian. Don't need to save people that don't wanna be saved. Fuck'em.

Ben:

you know, so here, here's an interesting thing because I am not an evangelical type at all. There have been very few times in my life when I have proselytized to someone and it's really only been under. Them asking for it. That, that to me is the right sort of scenario. I'm, I don't profess my faith to everyone. I let my faith be what it is. I, you know, try and

Gene:

the great God Zino teaches us to do likewise.

Ben:

I, I try and be a good Christian and let that be an example and speak for itself. I don't go around with my Bible thumping everyone on the head saying, Hey, you should listen to this. And, and I think that's the right approach. So what I would say is, you know, you can only save the willing and if people aren't willing, then you're not gonna save them anyway.

Gene:

exactly. Then you ban'em.

Ben:

Okay. You don't expend the effort on them. Sure.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah. Yeah. If, if their ears fail to hear, then I don't need to waste my breath on them. I think that's a quote from the Bible.

Ben:

Yeah. Casting pearls before shaline, I think is more the way it was said.

Gene:

That's the English translation. But same meaning point being is that there are people that will be a part of this, this coming event for, for lack of a better term. That could be much more prepared if their minds were a little more open. But as a result of not being prepared, are, are going to become much worse off than they are today.

Ben:

Well, I think there's a lot of people out there that absolutely, you know, it doesn't take a lot to make a big difference in something like this. You know, buy a couple extra cans of soup when you go to the grocery store or have some food storage. Have a means to defend yourself

Gene:

to Tim Pool. It's all takes.

Ben:

or us, or no agenda, or you know, Alex Jones

Gene:

Yeah. I mean,

Ben:

there. There are lots of

Gene:

is there, there's tons of options, but my point is simply that stop looking at external factors of the differences between people because, you know, every person is equally valuable, somebody said. And start paying attention to what people are saying and focus on that. It's, it's the message. It's not all the pretty things around the message that are important. And this is why it, it's always bugged me my entire life, why people in this, in this country, but not just in this country, but to a large extent in this country, have this predisposition to wanting to know. What celebrities, what famous people are thinking and saying, who gives a shit? They're not important. What's important are people that are experts in those particular areas and the knowledge that you can get from them. Unfiltered. Is a filter for actual research, so don't listen to the cdc, but do listen to the people that actually practice the research that's investigating virology.

Ben:

well, and you know, that actually is a whole nother point in and of itself is being able to read a paper and look at the statistical analysis and being able to determine for yourself the validity of said paper, I think is in this day and age in this society that we live in a absolute necessity of a skill.

Gene:

It's, and it's a rare skill, and that is the ideal scenario. And if you can't do that, then find some good trustworthy interpreters and, and outlets for that information. There are a ton of YouTube videos and other platforms, not just YouTube, of people in all kinds of super nche, like you'd never, you know, spend more than a couple hours on than they spend their entire life on this topic. Areas that you can learn things from and do it in a way that bypasses all the filters, and of course the final filter. Most people. Have in front of them is quote unquote the media, that that is the, the last of the filters, the filter before that are the quote unquote experts. Cuz you, you gotta understand if somebody's showing up on TV as an expert, they're not an expert. They are a personality that wants to be on TV more than they want to do something in their field. Because the people that actually do things in their

Ben:

an ability to get the, the person booking them had the ability to get their

Gene:

Yeah, yeah. Like the person actually doing the work is not trying to get on television. Fauci isn't the expert, Fauci is the talking head on that particular topic. And so you have a, a lot of layers of filters to get through, but the information's there if you look for it. But if you're gonna start saying things like, oh well, you know, this guy wears a hat and therefore anything he says is just stupid, well then you, you deserve what you get. By the way, I I, I, I did the order of beanie.

Ben:

you did not,

Gene:

I did, I did.

Ben:

why?

Gene:

I don't wear these things, but I, I think it, it'd be funny to see me in a beanie,

Ben:

It will

Gene:

you think? That'd

Ben:

to see you in a Beanie

Gene:

Yeah. I'll do some, I'll do a little photo cover montage.

Ben:

Well, I, I am not a Beanie fan personally.

Gene:

either. I think it's stupid personally, but I don't let that dissuade me from the information that somebody who wears a beanie might have

Ben:

Yeah. I,

Gene:

or the message.

Ben:

I, I don't, you know, here's the thing though, if you have hair, beanies are uncomfortable, right? Because eventually your hair starts to

Gene:

Well, I wouldn't know

Ben:

thing. So, Since Tim's bald, I guess it doesn't matter.

Gene:

wearing a beanie, really the closest I've ever come to a beanie is like when I went skiing you know, when I lived up north, the, the hat I would put on would be sort of similar to a beanie, I guess, but a little thicker probably to keep the, the cold off my head.

Ben:

And same here. Which man do I miss skiing? That is something I

Gene:

oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, you know what I missed the most though is the, the fall, the colors, the leaves turning.

Ben:

I,

Gene:

It just doesn't happen here. We just don't have that. We go from green leaves on trees to no leaves on trees in literally one day all the leaves

Ben:

it's part of, it's the species of tree that we have

Gene:

I know, I know. It's exactly right. But e every time I like fly up to Washington state or something, and it's just, If it's in the fall, you, you're flying over these gorgeous, beautiful, bright colors, which incidentally, these are the actual colors of all the plants. We just see them as green because the chlorophyl absorbs all these colors and reflects only green. And so when the chlorophyl is no longer in the leaves, we actually see the true colors of all these things. It's pretty amazing.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

It's a wild world out there.

Ben:

It is

Gene:

Yeah. So, you know, you, along with a few other friends, I have insist on sending me stuff every time there's a news article about China somehow doing something poorly as evidence that the downfall of China is imminent.

Ben:

I, I think it's

Gene:

Oh, it's not just you. It's, it's a, it's a number of my friends that all seem to have this preoccupation that,

Ben:

Well, what's that tell you?

Gene:

well, what it tells me is that I'm gonna have a lot of friends that I can say, see, I told you to before too long But it's it's interesting because the one thing that I haven't seen is somebody saying this that has in-depth knowledge of China. Because every time you see a story like this, every time there's a book written, it's always by somebody from the west. And it's the western analysis of China. It's the western you know, prediction for China. Well, guess what the west has been saying for literally 40 years that China was on the verge of dumping communism and becoming capitalists. 40 years I've been hearing this and it, you know, they thought that with China opening up back in Nixon times,

Ben:

Huh

Gene:

that that they were idiots for doing that deal because it, it meant a very quick reversal of Chinese politics and dumping of socialism, communism. How well is that working out?

Ben:

You're, you have no argument for me. Go on.

Gene:

so my point being that the West has this mentality that, looking from the lens of the west, mostly US, but certainly Europe as well, that the only reason that China is their current system of government, which is hard to call socialists cuz it's really a very blended system. There are a lot of aspects

Ben:

There's no other word

Gene:

there. No, no, no, no, no. There's an awful lot of controlled capitalism there, there there's a lot of There's a lot of fascist aspects to it where the government is involved in corporations. There are a lot of different political systems. I think that that bits and pieces have been grabbed from

Ben:

Yeah. I mean,

Gene:

the Chinese

Ben:

you won't disagree that it is totalitarian,

Gene:

Oh yeah. It's definitely, but, but that's the other thing is people confuse totalitarian and socialists. They're two different things. In fact, actual socialism, the way that marks and Engels described it is not totalitarian. It is a system that is really governed by the people, and the only reason that there are government officials at all is for efficiency's sake, because you can't have every person be involved in every decision. But all those decisions are all made on the behalf of the population which is literally the opposite of totalitarianism, where the decisions are made on, by and for a very small group of people. You know, what's totalitarian is like non constitutional monarchies.

Ben:

Yeah. So real communism has never been tried, huh?

Gene:

Well, I don't think it's possible in a group beyond, you know, maybe family or a couple family size. I mean, I, I think a kibbutz in, in Israel is the closest that you can come to a functional socialist.

Ben:

We can

Gene:

people know what a kibbutz

Ben:

that.

Gene:

Well, it's functional enough that they've been around for many years. Do, just in case people don't know what a kibbutz is, it's basically a small self-sustaining like farming generally community. And these were very prevalent in, in Israel back in the seventies, eighties. I don't know how

Ben:

Yeah, I mean, it's a, it's the Israeli version of a hippie commune.

Gene:

It's a hippie commune where everybody works. So imagine a hippie commune without the drugs, but with work. But the idea is that if everybody puts in some work that, that there's more than enough for everybody to consume. And I mean, that's the one other thing, like, let's not whitewash the past. There's an awful lot of communist ideas that were pervasive in the Jewish state. The, a lot of Jews, Marx included, were very socialistic.

Ben:

Yeah. I want to see where you go with this one.

Gene:

Well, the, I'm saying that, you know, it's, it's one thing to be on the yeas side and just like blame the Jews for everything. But also I think it is irresponsible to pretend somehow that Israel and the United States are exactly the same country. Far from it, the history of Israel and the history of the Zionist movement were greatly influenced and had a lot of people that would self-identify as socialists, if not outright communists. And that is historically accurate. That's just reality. That's where it is. Now, the, the danger here is to somehow draw a line between those two and create a causal relationship and say that, well, all Jews are communists, for example. Clearly not. But also it would be responsible to think that Israel and a lot of Israelis, even once living there right now that they don't have more socialist leanings than the United States, cuz they absolutely do as a, not as a ethnicity, but as a country. It's definitely a lot more socialist and has socialist tendencies outside of politics, meaning just the way families live, the way relationships work. There's an expectation of a lot more of, well, that's your responsibility to help these people. That's you. Like you need to do these things Lot more so than in the United States. In the United States, that's left more to the church in Israel. That's in a lot of ways the state. And it's also, I think, why they had some of the highest participation in the covid vaccines.

Ben:

Well, and what's your prediction there? H h How much of the population is going to be reduced in Israel due to that compliance?

Gene:

Yeah, it's interesting. I, I think definitely there's gonna be a very clear distinction between the, the ultra-Orthodox Jews that don't believe in vaccines and the very progressive socialist type younger Jews that are all gung ho, give me a vaccine every month kind of types. I think we're gonna see a reduction in one population and an increase in the other one.

Ben:

Well, it's going to very much be interesting to see how that plays out. You know, the, did you watch Netanyahu on j r or not j r e on Jordan Peterson.

Gene:

Nope.

Ben:

It was, it was pretty good,

Gene:

You know, I don't know why Jordan Peterson's podcast isn't coming up on recommendations nearly as often.

Ben:

I, I don't know. You should subscribe because it,

Gene:

I am subscribed, dude.

Ben:

does a fantastic

Gene:

I think the problem right now I have is I'm probably subscribed to 500 different channels.

Ben:

don't do that.

Gene:

Well, but those are all my interests.

Ben:

Yeah. But still don't do that. But anyway,

Gene:

Well, but I don't know how to control myself then.

Ben:

you know, a lot of people sit there and talk about whether or not Israel has a right to exist and so on. And I am by no means necessarily a Zionist. But, you know, I, I, I think that the country is established, is there and is not, and should not be going anywhere.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

I, I, I think it is an interesting question to say how they are governed and what they are doing and how the Palestinians are approached. And I think that there's some debate there, but I think in general that, you know, whatever, go do whatever you wanna do.

Gene:

Well, that's a mouthful of nothing.

Ben:

What do you mean?

Gene:

Hey, they maybe should exist. No problems. I have no issues with anybody. They're

Ben:

No, they should exist. They do exist. The question is, do they represent the Palestinians functionally enough? How do you handle a sec, a

Gene:

don't represent the Basilians. The PLA represents Palestinians.

Ben:

Okay. But that's a problem. If Israel is going to be the government over the area, then they need to,

Gene:

Do they

Ben:

I want my government separate from my

Gene:

Arabia, does the government of Saudi Arabia represent the Christians in Saudi Arabia?

Ben:

Not at all. I don't think that's a good example.

Gene:

well, but it's in, it's in a very close example distance wise.

Ben:

Yes. And you're talking about something that is also equally as problematic,

Gene:

yeah, well, that's fine. I'm just saying that that different countries have different cultural norms and I, I think that in the Middle East, whether it's a Jewish country or a Muslim country or whatever country there is a tradition of having theocracies.

Ben:

Yes. And I don't like theocracies.

Gene:

Well, that's fine. We don't have to like it. We're eight and a half thousand miles away.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

So, now Israel, because I think it was in the early days, made up of a lot of immigrants from the United States, not just Europe. I mean, the US has had typically the second largest population of Jews in the world,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

Because it, it's where you could escape to So, lot of, lot of Jews ended up in the US and a lot of Jews, certainly not a majority, but a lot of Jews when Israel was created, moved from the United States to help build this new country of Israel. That also kind of solved a little bit of the socialist problem in the United States because, you know, a lot of Jews were socialists, so they left the United States, and as a result, less socialism here. But well, a again, I'm just saying historical things. These are not controversial things. This is just historically true.

Ben:

They are controversial because people don't like facts.

Gene:

my mind. They're not

Ben:

Okay. Well, I'm

Gene:

historical

Ben:

it is definitely a third rail topic that we are touching.

Gene:

I, I guess, I don't know, but but I'm not saying anything, a third rail, you know, I'm not saying that, you know, Hitler was misunderstood, although you probably was, but I, I wouldn't say that.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

Anyway. And so,

Ben:

been nice talking to you Jean

Gene:

this used to be a good podcast on Apple Podcasts. And not anymore

Ben:

and we're not there anymore.

Gene:

Hey, I've been, I, I gotta say as far controversial topics, I'm still amazed. I haven't been kicked off of Twitter yet because I am all filters off on Twitter. I mean, it is just like raw.

Ben:

What, what have you said that you would've expected cancellation on?

Gene:

Let me think. What would be an edge? Well, just calling a lot of people pedophiles

Ben:

Well, I mean,

Gene:

their Twitter account,

Ben:

yeah, but I mean,

Gene:

telling people that they belong in prison.

Ben:

slanderous and liable laws, you know, if there's a reasonable reasonable expectation that it may be true is you know, a defense.

Gene:

Well, and I'm pretty good at phrasing these things. I'm like, like, you know, I wouldn't say you're a pedophile, I would say so I, so that's what a pedophile would say. Huh. You know, I'm, I'm asking questions, I guess. Anyway, back to Israel. So the point was that while Israel wasn't created as a theocracy, because a lot of the Jews were non-practicing Jews that went there the one thing that I think was universal is the idea that we are getting a place of our own, we're getting a territory that we fully control. Well, that wouldn't work if you had a bunch of Muslims voting.

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

Okay. And so, you know, that somewhat creates a defect to the cracy.

Ben:

I, I just don't defend bureaucracies of any kind.

Gene:

Yeah. You don't need to, I mean, again, we're, I think we're both on the meritocracy side of the issue here. Like they ought to be a poll tax, but But I think that for a lot of first generation Israelis, and I think we're well past the first generation at this point, Israel was great at what, 1948. So it's been three generations now at least. But for a lot of those first generation Israelis you know, they weren't gonna let anything happen to lose the control of this new piece of land that they got, including voting. So the idea of having effectively Palestinians pushed into these separate little areas I think is one of the consequences of the need to have that piece of land be controlled by Jews.

Ben:

Okay. That, that's all fine and dandy. I'm just saying don't re t yourself on the international stage as a democracy when you're not.

Gene:

Well, it's, I mean, it's

Ben:

your governmental system is not working for the minorities in your community, you have a failed governmental system.

Gene:

Well, that

Ben:

true here in the US too.

Gene:

Yeah, I dunno about that. I, I think that the, the governmental system needs to treat everybody exactly as anybody else. Be blind to it.

Ben:

Agreed.

Gene:

And that means ignoring your minorities.

Ben:

Okay. So you have to defend the rights of the minorities, is what I'm

Gene:

No, you don't. No. You have to treat everybody equally.

Ben:

but your governmental system should, so the United States perfect example. We were set up so that the minority opinion would be protected from the foundations of our government,

Gene:

right?

Ben:

that that's the way it should be. Not that you're specifically trying to go out and say, okay, minority, I'm gonna protect you, but the foundations and the fundamentals of your system

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

doing that innately

Gene:

no, I, I, yeah, I get, I get all that, but also this system wasn't set up by a bunch of Jews going back to their, you know, ancestral home. What, and what I mean by that is you can't apply the the same sort of rationale for the existence of the United States as you can for the existence of Israel.

Ben:

Didn't try.

Gene:

Well, the, the idea that, you know, like you said, this, this government was set up to protect the minorities. Yeah, sure. But not every government was.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

weren't So if you look at it

Ben:

I think they should be

Gene:

Yeah, yeah. I, I don't disagree with you. I think they should be, but also acknowledging that most are not, and also acknowledging the sovereignty of nations. Like, I'm not gonna try and change the government of Saudi Arabia because I have this notion that, you know, they don't have enough freedom and I wanna bring my freedom to them at the point of a gun,

Ben:

well, and there's the difference. So the difference is in speech versus physical action. I think we absolutely should call out Saudi Arabia and say, Hey, the kingdom governmental system sucks and it should be better. And

Gene:

It literally is a kingdom

Ben:

Correct. And you know, I think we should call that out. But do I think that we should spend human life in troops to go enforce it? No, I don't. And I don't think you can. You can't bring democracy or liberalization

Gene:

How'd that work out in Afghanistan?

Ben:

Well, it, it doesn't work. That's why you have to just let it, you know, it has to evolve and the people have to want it. Otherwise, it, it will never take hold.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly. People have to want it, and if they want it bad enough, they will make a French Revolution now.

Ben:

Episode number two of the French Revolution podcast, all right, gene, we'll talk to you next week.

Gene:

Sounds good, Ben.