Just Two Good Old Boys

010 Just Two Good Old Boys

December 30, 2022 Gene Naftulyev Season 2022 Episode 10
010 Just Two Good Old Boys
Just Two Good Old Boys
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Just Two Good Old Boys
010 Just Two Good Old Boys
Dec 30, 2022 Season 2022 Episode 10
Gene Naftulyev

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Just Two Good Old Boys
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Show Notes Transcript

Support the Show.

Read Ben's blog and see product links at namedben.com
Check out Gene's other podcasts -
podcast.sirgene.com and unrelenting.show
If you have comments drop at
Email: gene@sirgene.com Or dude@namedben.com
or on
X.com: @sirgeneTX @dudenamedbenTX
Can't donate? sub to Gene's GAMING youtube channel (even if you never watch!) Sub Here
Weekend Gaming Livestream atlasrandgaming onTwitch
StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
Get EMP protection for your car using our code sirgene

Gene:

Happy Christmas. Ben. How you doing?

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

I am doing good. Gene, Merry Christmas special episode Today. Most people are taking off

Gene:

taking off what?

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

for Christmas, like Tim Pool's not even doing a show for the rest of the year. Man,

Gene:

That's fucked up right? He's such a slacker, I swear to God.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

Yeah. I think he more had issues getting guests. I don't know why he can't do his daily show, but whatever. You know, we're here, we're working.

Gene:

Yep. Working hard, so you don't have to wait. No, that doesn't work.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

Hardly working.

Gene:

Yeah, lately. So, what'd you do for Christmas? I know you're one of those Christian people.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

Yeah. I had some family over. you know, we were, my, my parents live a ways away. And so they came and stayed with us for a couple of nights and we did Christmas. Then they went home and we were supposed to go to my wife's family later in the day, Christmas day and go to her family's Christmas. But unfortunately her and the two little kids are positive for Covid. So

Gene:

Hmm.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

they, they got sick and anyway so we didn.

Gene:

when the weather's bad outside as you get colds?

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

Yeah, exactly. And I, I Why she even bothered to test, I don't know. It doesn't really, to me it's like, okay, so I know what strain of cold I have. Great.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

So we didn't go do that, but her mom and stepdad and sister came over here to, you know, kind of just do a little birthday party for my son who is a Christmas baby. He was born on Christmas day.

Gene:

Oh, that's, I didn't know that.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

Yep. He's a, he, it's a very uncommon birthday

Gene:

Yeah.

2022-12-26--t04-08-22pm--guest459315--ben:

Yeah, it just worked out that way. So

Gene:

Gotcha. Well, it's, it's unfortunate to hear about the the infections

Ben:

I'm not too worried about it.

Gene:

eh, shouldn't

Ben:

I did a smoked prime rib as

Gene:

Oh, nice.

Ben:

and that came out really good. I did a little bit of injection on it with some seasoning and some beef towel. And then did a garlic or butter on the outside and got a pretty good crust and yeah, it reverse sear on the smoker and it, it came out good.

Gene:

Yeah, it's funny, you and my my buddy Eric, who makes the wallet, well, also works at Amazon, but he did the exact same thing you did?

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah, it's he, he, I don't know how many hours he smoked it for, but he sent me some photos.

Ben:

yeah, so it to come up to temperature, it took which it was cold outside, you know, I mean, it, it was, it was cold. We were in the, you know, teens and twenties. We had a pretty good cold spill here in Texas. And anyway, so that took some, you know, added time. But I smoked mine for about five hours and got it up to temp and it, it was good.

Gene:

nice.

Ben:

was also a 12 pound roast though, so.

Gene:

Now he uses a thermometer. What the hell is this thing called? I'm trying to remember. But it, you stick it in. It's a Bluetooth thermometer or Bluetooth? Yeah, I think it's Bluetooth. So it actually monitors the ambient air temperature inside the smoker as well as the internal meat temperature, and then sends you all that information and then when, when it, the meat hits the temperature that you preset, it gives you an alarm. Do you have one? Those?

Ben:

Yeah. I've got something similar. So

Gene:

Yeah,

Ben:

like my, on my pellet grill, you know, that's built in. Obviously I've got four probes on it and you know,

Gene:

Bluetooth.

Ben:

Wifi actually,

Gene:

Oh, cool. What brand is that? Let's advertise the hell out of that.

Ben:

Well, a bunch of'em have it. Traeger has it. Pit Boss has it. Camp Chef has it. Lot of'em have it

Gene:

Wow. I am bought a grill in 10 years, so I'm clearly behind the times.

Ben:

Oh, it's fantastic, man. So one of the, one of the reasons why I wanted a pellet grill like this is, you know, I like charcoal. I like my offset smoker. But it, that takes a lot of effort, right? It, it, you have to maintain it. This, I can literally be working upstairs and cooking steaks downstairs and just monitoring it.

Gene:

Now is it smart enough to adjust itself or not?

Ben:

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. You set temperature you want it at, and I can control the temperature from here. I can do it all from here. I mean, it's got, you know, if you've got four probes on this thing, so for instance, if someone's doing a filet, I'm doing a rib eye, and then some we're doing chicken too or something. I can have probes in representative meat and know where we're at. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And you know, it, it's, they're fantastic dude. I, I will never have a gas grill again. So the, the pellet, the pellet grill to me is the convenience of gas,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

actually more convenient because of the apps and everything that you have now. the convenience of gas with at least some of the flavor of wood and charcoal.

Gene:

Hmm. Yeah. That's very cool.

Ben:

Yeah, it, it's definitely worth getting. Like, one of the things that when I grow up and, you know, have a, have some income, I'll get my dad one.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

So,

Gene:

Yeah. How's that going?

Ben:

I'm sorry,

Gene:

How's the growing up part going?

Ben:

You know what it's, it's funny cuz my parents have always said, you know, we just gotta figure out what we wanna be when we grow up. You know, it's been a running joke. So that's kind that comes from. But it's going pretty good.

Gene:

Well, it sounds like you figure out what you want your parents to grow up to be. Ranchers.

Ben:

Yeah, that's definitely definitely a thing. Pursuing trying to lock down cold storage and you know, make sure we've got the right butcher lined up and stuff like that. So before we go down the road too far, we just gotta get everything, you know, lined up. You got, I, I, I'm not just going to jump in and, you know, wing it. I'm not that kind of guy, so

Gene:

Yeah. I would I don't know. I, I, I've never had to do this, but I have a sneaky suspicion I would probably end up with a pet cow

Ben:

I, I won't,

Gene:

I know, I know No, and I, I,

Ben:

up raising cows, so,

Gene:

yeah, I, I just I, I, I like animals, man. I like interacting with them. I also like eating them, but I don't know that the combination of the two would work. I've never tried it, so I, I wouldn't,

Ben:

so it, it's not, you know, it's not that. So depending on how much you interact with them you know, unless you. unless they've been interacted with literally since birth, essentially. a lot, you've got a lot to overcome. So if you just buy, know, a 500 pound steer and throw it out in the pasture and then feeding it, the only way it's gonna even come up to you is if you're trying to, if you're feeding it and then you know, it's not really gonna let you touch it or do much. And I mean, it's gonna take a lot and maybe you'll get to where if I'm feeding it, I can pet it. But you know, it's not like a dog that's gonna run up and lay in your lap or play or

Gene:

videos of cos running up and wanting to light into your lap too.

Ben:

Sure. If they've been imprinted from birth,

Gene:

Yeah.

Ben:

but that's not how that's gonna happen most of the time.

Gene:

Did you ever watch that video of the guy sent you

Ben:

I have watched some of it.

Gene:

the gold Shaw Farms? If anyone's curious on YouTube? It's a guy who was a I believe he was an accountant in the Washington DC area. Made some good money by the time he was in his thirties, he could retire. And he, I guess he always wanted to be a farmer. So he bought a place in Vermont for cash. And has been sort of documenting on YouTube for the last three years. His progression of his farm and the current thing, the I guess about a year ago he bought some cattle. He bought I think. One steer and four heifers. Is that right?

Ben:

Hmm. Maybe depends on what to do with them.

Gene:

What's a female cow?

Ben:

The Heifer is a female cow that hasn't given birth.

Gene:

Okay. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So that's who you bought. And now they've all given birth, the females. And the steers been turned into steaks. And now he's got four little baby cows that have grown up since they were babies which two and two. So two males, two females.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

And, and then he also just bought, but I don't know if he took delivery yet of a a brand new baby bowl So one that's not gonna lose its nuts from a different genetic line to end up being the, the future parent of all the new generations. So it's been fun watching it. Before that he's also got a shit ton of geese, ducks, chickens you know, smaller stuff. But the, the cows is his first foray into the big animals. And one of the things that's been happening there is he's kind of been in a feud. With a really stupid local law, which actually ties into politics. We can talk about for hunting, that allows dogs to, or allows people to go retrieve their dogs on private property. And the dogs are basically chasing bears trying to get them cornered so they can get shot. And so he was woken up a few years ago by noise in his property you know, got ready to deal with either predators or criminals and ran into these hunters that were all over his land and told him to get the hell out of there yada, yada yada. Anyway, so I think he sh he and I shared the same opinion of this practice, which is, it ought to be illegal, but but the state of Vermont has a lot of these rules on the books. And so anyway, that's the backdrop for the, the fact that a lot of the local Vermont old boys really hate him cuz he's like a, a foreigner that came up from the south, bought a piece of land and doesn't like their laws. And I don't mean foreigners, non-American. I mean like he's not from around

Ben:

Yeah. He's an outsider.

Gene:

Yeah. He's an outsider

Ben:

Which a lot in rural, rural America, depending on where you're at,

Gene:

So they've actually lodged a complaint with the whatever the department is for the fact that his cows don't have brands or ear tags,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

and he thinks that, you know, like those are, he knows what his cows are. They follow him by name. He doesn't need them to have ear tags or anything anyway, but it, it, it is funny to me seeing how petty people can get based on these types of issues. So what that as a backdrop, what do you think of these laws that, that say that you can trespass,

Ben:

Well, I mean, so it, there are various, and we've talked about this some, like Texas is a, you know, free range state, you know, Montana similarly. So basically you have to keep people off of your property. So you have to post no trespassing. Trespassing is not by default. Right? Now residential areas and municipalities and counties may have different laws, but as far as general state law is concerned, I have to post trespassing

Gene:

right? That's a law, but is it stupid or not?

Ben:

I mean, I understand the historical context about it. I think trespassing should be trespassing. Now, there is an argument to, if I, if there is no barrier,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

walking in what I think is state land or type two land, and then I accidentally step on your property, is that trespassing? No, it shouldn't be.

Gene:

They absolutely should be

Ben:

Why, what have you put to notify me that I'm st. That, that there is a

Gene:

Oh, that's whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. You're saying criminals have to be notified of committing a crime? No, that's absolutely not the case. You are responsible for knowing the law. And the same here. If you're walking around not knowing whose land you're walking on, then you ought to step on a piece of dynamite and have it blow off your log. That's my intake. It's private property. Private property is private. It's not public.

Ben:

I agree,

Gene:

there's no reason that you ought to be trespassing.

Ben:

you have to notify someone. You

Gene:

No, you don't. No, not at all. They need to learn how to use a map before they go walking somewhere.

Ben:

I, I think there's some utility in saying, okay, there's a fence. If you cross that fence that is trespassing, because now you have crossed a barrier.

Gene:

So

Ben:

You remove

Gene:

around fences. It's built around ownership of land.

Ben:

I understand. But you remove excuses.

Gene:

Well, you don't need an excuse if you don't accept an excuse. And I think laying mines around your property is equivalent to offense.

Ben:

just a few claymores, you know, nothing big. Yeah. In most states, booby traps are illegal. By the way,

Gene:

That's another stupid law. Did we not learn anything from Hold on alone?

Ben:

Indeed. Indeed.

Gene:

The educational film?

Ben:

definitely watched that movie a couple times over the weekend. That was good.

Gene:

Oh, you did. I haven't seen it in 20 years

Ben:

yeah. We were binge watching Christmas movies and stuff cuz cold and nothing to, you know, couldn't go outside and play with the kids, so we're just trying to keep'em

Gene:

you know, Macaulay Caulkin still looks like that.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

He was on some YouTube channel recently that I saw. I was like, holy shit. His face hasn't changed.

Ben:

No, no.

Gene:

He's just got a goatee. But other than that looks same.

Ben:

Did you,

Gene:

of dopey looking.

Ben:

yeah. Did you see about the Carry Lake lawsuit?

Gene:

I mean, I got tired of hearing about it every now what's the latest now?

Ben:

Thrown out. Done.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. I figured that would happen.

Ben:

Yeah. But I mean, there was enough.

Gene:

involved in political issues. It, it's a hot topic, it's a hot data. They don't wanna deal with it.

Ben:

but there's enough there. And so first of all, I have evidence that Adam listens to this show,

Gene:

Which show?

Ben:

our show.

Gene:

Oh, I don't think he does, but go ahead.

Ben:

well it was just interesting cuz on Sunday's, no agenda, he was talking about the Carry Lake thing and how egregious this dismissal was. And he was wondering when it would get to a Parisian moment. So There's French Revolution reference.

Gene:

Yeah. And I've been making those left and right. I mean, he probably, he does read No Gen Social and I've mentioned that on Ogen Social.

Ben:

Nah, well, regardless. And, but I, I think that's a valid point because there was so much

Gene:

you're more than welcome to send them a link to the, the show. You know, kinda encourage him to listen. I have no, no problem with you doing that.

Ben:

I'll, I'll text it to him.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Yeah. But anyway, no,

Gene:

we're getting there. And this is actually one of the topics I did wanna bring up today is the topic of ethics. I sent you a link to an interview with two former Russians, now, former Ukrainians. Lex had Michael Malon.

Ben:

yeah, and I had actually, before you even sent the link, I'd watched probably a good hour of

Gene:

Okay. Okay. Good, good, good. So one of the topics and Malice just wrote a book on the history of. Happening, political stuff happening? I don't know. He writes a bunch of books, but I haven't read any of em. But what was interesting is he was talking about socialism, and this is like socialism back in the turn of the century, turn of the 20th century, so hundred years ago, a little over a hundred years ago, in fact. So pre-World War II socialism, and there was socialists in, in England, there were socialists obviously in Russia that became pretty successful and overthrowing the legitimate government.

Ben:

There was a socialist party in the United States. There was a communist party in the United States. There was a Nazi party in the United States at this

Gene:

Yeah. Well, I think Nazi movement in general is pretty popular in the United States until it wasn't. But anyway, the the thing that he mentioned, which got me thinking is that he brought up is like the anarchist cookbook and the, the, the freedom of speech versus subversive information. And where does that line line get loin? Where does that line get drawn? Meaning, can you argue for armed rebellion? Is that covered under the First Amendment? can you put a book out that tells people how to make bombs at home? Is that covered under the First Amendment?

Ben:

So the bombs at home absolutely. Is there are laws on the books. You know, incitement to violence not free speech. That said, I would say, and what I would put back on the court, and I would love to see a lawsuit on this, is, you know, something like Thomas Payne's Common Sense. That's exactly what that book did.

Gene:

Okay.

Ben:

Have you ever read Common

Gene:

I am not, no, that's why you're getting a blank stare

Ben:

okay, sorry. So, common Sense by Thomas Payne outlined an argument on why America should seek independence from Great Britain, and that now was the time, and here is why. Here is what must happen. And that if we wait too long, the moment will be lost.

Gene:

mm-hmm.

Ben:

So yeah. Thomas Payne you know, one of the founding fathers not directly involved with the Revolution or you know, in the sense that of Washington or Jefferson but definitely a thought leader of his time.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. And did he Promotes this, another topic coming from that interview, A violent revolution or peaceful revolution.

Ben:

I believe the words any means necessary was used.

Gene:

Okay, so he was skirting it basically.

Ben:

I don't know that he was

Gene:

wink, wink, nudge, nudge. Well, direct would be, and you need to kill these people. That would be direct indirect and skirting the issue would be like, do whatever you have to you're great patriots. And, and then leaving it up to people's imagination to see what that means. I think I think it does bring up a very good issue, which is that we have been backsliding into totalitarianism and away from free speech and other initial constitutional meanings, at least what I believe the original meanings of these things were in that the first amendment was universal in the, in that these are not rights granted you by the government. These are rights that you as a free white man have and therefore can utilize at your own discretion and therefore doing things like publishing the Recipe to a bomb is just as legal as calling for the overthrow of the American government when that government ceases us to function in the manner that the constitution prescribe it to function. What do you think about that?

Ben:

I, I mean, I should be able to put out a recipe for a bomb the same as I put out a recipe for, you know, a steak.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

it's speech, you know, freedom of speech is

Gene:

But we've gotten

Ben:

of speech

Gene:

so far away from that concept that we have now effectively imprisoned and been killing a journalist who's not an American citizen, who hasn't resided in America, but that put out some information that the US government didn't like.

Ben:

Mm-hmm. Yes.

Gene:

He has been wanted in the United States now for a decade and been forced to give up his life effectively. I mean, he's, he was living in a little rat hole for like a decade.

Ben:

The Ecuadorian Embassy,

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Hi. Sorry. I apologize to the Ecuadorians listening to this podcast.

Ben:

you know, it, it is interesting because I didn't realize he was married.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

And then that really brings up a lot of questions on the whole Pam Anderson thing. Like, Hmm, I don.

Gene:

what's the Pam Anderson thing?

Ben:

Oh, she was going to visit Assange and doing all sorts of stuff. She was real Julian.

Gene:

Hmm. Interesting.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

well, what, what does one have to do with the other dog?

Ben:

Well, I mean, I always assumed there was something going on between him and Anderson, but I don't know.

Gene:

Huh? I don't know, dude. I think he's lucky enough just to get up in the morning,

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

you know, if he'd be up for a little toss, tossing the sack with an old woman.

Ben:

okay. I mean, Pamela Anderson, man.

Gene:

Yeah. It's not a 20 year old family Anderson. No.

Ben:

This is true.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Yeah, I mean, I'm glad she was on that sank bandwagon. I guess I hadn't heard that, but it's probably been censored, so it's not on the airwaves.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

So that's just one example, but there's tons of examples. The January 6th you know, they're not, they're, I guess imprisonments would be the way you put it. They're, they're not actually convictions, although they have had some convictions, mostly by threatening people with much bigger charges.

Ben:

They haven't

Gene:

and then people, yeah. So they have pled guilty, but you know, they had people sitting in jail before pleading guilty, and they pled guilty to get out of jail essentially, because they were given time served.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

like, well, you plead guilty, you leave right away. If you don't, we're gonna keep you here another decade while we charge you. Wait, how that, that isn't unreasonable punishment. I don't know.

Ben:

happened to the

Gene:

country definitely has gone. Yeah, yeah, exactly. I used that defense once and it worked. I actually managed to to not have a trial postponed because it was already postponed once and the prosecution couldn't bring their main witness in. And I, I defended myself and I, I pled for dismissal based on that, and the judge agreed. So it worked out.

Ben:

Yeah, so this is a great quote from Common Sense. Common sense will tell us that the power which hath endeavored to subdue us is of all others, the most improper to defend us. I think

Gene:

Well that's, that is a good quote, talking right about the government. Yep,

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

exactly. And I just think that the, the attitude, not just of the Democrats frankly, but of the Republicans just as much lately and their. Complete lack of well, I'm trying to think of the right word, but essentially their lack of feeling of understanding that they are employees of the public. Like they're acting like they are nobility rather than servants of the public.

Ben:

That's because that's, they, they functionally are.

Gene:

They are. Yeah. And I blame the populace for this of letting it get to this point, but the only thing that's ever gonna change it, if people wanted to change, I mean, maybe people in this country are ready for a king. I mean a lot of other countries like the idea of kings. We have a a king in China and a king in Russia right now. So people like that at concept. I guess that's fine. They can choose that. But we're sure Sal getting close to that in the us I'm not a big fan of that.

Ben:

no, and I think the, the key mistakes that have been made in this country's history I, so first of all, I think the incorporation doctrine is absolutely horrendous and has to be overthrown. I think the interpretation of the 14th Amendment is absolutely asinine personally. But hey, you know, somehow equal protection under the law then translates to the second Amendment applies to the states, which is not historically how it has been directly electing our senators and getting away from a state's mentality is pretty atrocious. And I, you know, I, I don't see, you know, me and most libertarians and most conservatives have thought for a long time, but you gotta do it within the system that that's the only way to really accomplish anything. I don't believe that that is possible. No. Especially when something like the Carry Lake lawsuit gets thrown out and not investigated. When you had 20 inch paper and images for 19 inch ballots found all over the place, and the state, the state, the state's witness was cross-examined and asked what would happen if this was read by a 20 inch machine? It would be rejected. I'm

Gene:

Yep.

Ben:

so, you know, and here, here's the thing, you know, the, the state said, well, you can't prove intent. You can't prove malice. I don't care if it was incompetence. It needs to be looked at.

Gene:

Well, and that's a very good point is that I don't understand how you can't sue for incompetence. If somebody is a referee and they're in charge of observing any kind of sporting event, I don't care. Pick your event, and then they spend half their time flirting with somebody behind them. and ignoring the game and not seeing the mistakes made. How, how do you not call a redo there? How do, how do you not have the two teams play again with a different referee actually observing what's going on?

Ben:

Well, I mean, they're bad calls. The sporting analogy is not a great one because they're bad calls

Gene:

No, but, but it's the same thing in this morning. One is that I think if there's a bad call, then you need to redo. I don't think that that, just because somebody has the name referee means that they're actually making good calls. I think this is why things like cameras or in the, in, in the age of you know, the internet with voting camera, phones, these are good, valuable tools. Yes, you can fake

Ben:

in most polling places.

Gene:

but it's but yeah, see this is, we're literally at a point in this country where African countries do a better job with their elections than the United States.

Ben:

Yeah. So I think we need to

Gene:

They use fingerprints,

Ben:

Yeah. I think we need to give up the secret ballot and you know, maybe not

Gene:

know, that'll never happen because the winning party in these elections likes things to be obtuse.

Ben:

Okay, sure. But if we. Have the ability for a citizen to go online and put in their social, their address and their name and date of birth and look up their vote. I think that would

Gene:

But again, that sounds very libertarian, Ben, in that you're wishing for things and they're never gonna change. So either people are okay with this or you need to take action

Ben:

well, so what I'm getting to is I, you know, I've lobbied Congress, I've done my political due diligence for a

Gene:

you know that none of that works. Exactly.

Ben:

hold on, I'm saying we're getting to a point with these elections where the team sport aspect of it, the tribalism aspect of it is going through the roof. And you're getting to a point where if you do not, what's the JFK a quote, those who do not allow peaceful revolution, make violent revolution inevitable.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. that's a JFK quote. I didn't know that.

Ben:

Yeah. I may be paraphrasing it

Gene:

that was a, a Luke quote,

Ben:

No, there's, that's jfk. Yeah. Ridowsky definitely quotes it often,

Gene:

He does. Yes.

Ben:

which their episode from Turning Point USA Bannon was on fire man.

Gene:

Oh God. I thought Bannon was gonna have a, a aneurysm or something. He was so on fire.

Ben:

Yeah, I thought he was gonna call for

Gene:

an old dude. Well, I think he kinda was, you know, almost,

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

yeah, turning point seemed like a, a very good a very good rah rah event. I don't know that it's gonna have any effect long term, but it was good to let people get some energy out.

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Gene:

So, yeah, it's

Ben:

So if you're in Arizona, you need to petition your state government to change the voting laws so that elections can actually be challenged. And actually, you know what? I think every, every state needs to examine the ability to challenge an election.

Gene:

mm-hmm.

Ben:

And with enough Republican controlled state legislatures, you might actually get it,

Gene:

Yeah, I think we're well beyond that point at this point. The, the country's I think at a point of no return at this point. So the only thing things are gonna change in my humble estimate here is what we're seeing in France right now.

Ben:

which is

Gene:

Well, I sent you a photos, actually, I sent you two videos,

Ben:

okay when.

Gene:

Yesterday, the day before, probably day before Christmas.

Ben:

All right.

Gene:

yeah, I'm looking at'em right now. Just scroll up.

Ben:

oh yeah.

Gene:

the video of Larry David with the Palestinian Chicken, which is a great

Ben:

But what, what do you think what is your, so the French riots, what is your take on what is the cause? Because mainstream is saying one thing, other people are saying

Gene:

Oh, I think the cause is pretty obvious. I think that the, the French population doesn't like what its government is doing,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

and France they have a history of, of people taking to the streets with torches and hatchets when they don't like something the government is doing.

Ben:

so the mainstream media is saying that it's Muslim minorities doing most of those, but it sure doesn't seem that way to

Gene:

if you watch the videos, I only saw two Muslim dudes in the whole place.

Ben:

By the way a lot of people don't realize this, but France is still fairly well armed

Gene:

yeah. Yeah. And they also have

Ben:

than Great Britain.

Gene:

They have nukes. Yep.

Ben:

Well, I, I'm, I was talking about the citizenry having weapons.

Gene:

Oh, oh, I see what trephine. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Actually, you know, I don't know that, so I haven't really looked in French. Like I there's certain things France is known for, like it's food that I am pretty well versed on, but arms, I didn't, I have no idea what their laws are like.

Ben:

Yeah, so it, I've been doing some research on international gun laws and things like that, and French are considered one of the you know, obviously outside the us less restrictive on guns than a lot of the rest of the world and are pretty high up on the list on armed countries.

Gene:

hmm. Interesting. Okay. Well that's good to know. I guess Swiss are considered also, right?

Ben:

Well, I believe that there's some mandatory stuff there, but yeah,

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. I talked to a Swiss dude recently and it seems like, they have a lot of money out there.

Ben:

the Swiss having money. What?

Gene:

Like they're, yeah, I think they're, they're in the upper side of average wealth of a European,

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. Swiss banging logs have nothing to do with that.

Gene:

well, it's probably totally random. I mean, I know a lot of Swiss are farmers, but they definitely have like they make fun of the of the Euros

Ben:

Yeah,

Gene:

cuz they're so undervalued. They're like, it's fake money.

Ben:

well now it is.

Gene:

Yeah. Whereas the Swiss Franc is more valuable than the Euro or dollar. So interesting. Anyway, tangent. The I guess my, my point was that I have yet to see anybody on the right come anywhere near what I'm watching in these videos of French people.

Ben:

Huh. So in just real quick before we close it out, the French are the 26th most armed country per population in the world.

Gene:

Okay. And then the who's above them, if you have a list

Ben:

Portugal Pakistan, Greenland is 23. Sweden is 22. Kosovo is 21. New Zealand is 20. So, hello Lockdowns. What the hell did you let happen there? Switzerland is 19. Malta is 18. Norway is 17. Lichtenstein. Macedonia, Austria. Anyway skipping to top 10, 10 would be Finland, Cypress, Uruguay, Canada, Montenegro Serbia,

Gene:

Not for long.

Ben:

huh?

Gene:

Canada

Ben:

Oh, yeah. Canada. Yeah. Caledonia. Yemen. The f Falkland Islands is number two. And of States is number

Gene:

Falkland Islands is number two.

Ben:

per capita. Yeah.

Gene:

So must have been the British must have left all their shit there.

Ben:

Yep. Anyway, it's, I just thought was a little

Gene:

That is an interesting list. Yeah, for sure. So the left in the US is demonstrated being able to organize and burn billings down the right hasn't. And looking at it from an outside perspective, should it be at all surprising that the group that has demonstrated the use of violence is the one winning all the elections?

Ben:

I, no

Gene:

No. No. Because might makes Right. It has for the history of man and it is absolutely doing it right here. So I'm just getting tired of hearing all the libertarians and Republicans sitting there and bitching about how things are, things are exactly how they should be given how everybody is.

Ben:

but it, it, so it's

Gene:

somebody comes at you with a knife and your job is to say, excuse me, would you mind not coming out with me with a knife and then not doing anything else, you're gonna get exactly what you deserve.

Ben:

yeah. So the, the problem here is that this is the devolution of the, you know, the leap that was the United States or is the United States. So the United States was supposed to be the pinnacle of Western civilization where the individual was sovereign and Mike didn't make right, and that the minority rights were protected. That's why you're seeing that. So while, yeah, the rest of the world has been that way, the US had historically not been

Gene:

Yeah. And I think that sounds great in concept, but realistically, if you, the history of this country, it absolutely might, has always made right

Ben:

okay.

Gene:

in the expansion of the United States from the original 13 calories moving westward, Mike always makes right.

Ben:

Well, I mean, I think it was a mistake for the the US to expand beyond the Mississippi. In fact, Jefferson and others thought the same thing. They thought that what should happen is America should spawn off a sister country and not just control the entire continent. then you got

Gene:

called Texas. and then Texas had a bunch of idiots in it that wanted to rejoin.

Ben:

Yeah, well that uh, Texas succession polls looking better and better. That's all I can say.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. And that's, that's, that's a positive I think outlook. It, it looks like more people are warming up to the idea. Everybody does need to realize that it's never gonna happen because the United States has demonstrated what it will do to somebody that secedes and it's absolutely gonna do that to Texas as well.

Ben:

I don't know. So, you know, we are at a point where,

Gene:

Biden's gonna give up his oil

Ben:

well, I mean, if the United States goes to go bankrupt like the Soviet Union did in the nineties,

Gene:

Yeah,

Ben:

can totally see a breakup of the United

Gene:

well, before it goes bankrupt, it's got about 10 million Americans that needs to kill because as happened in the Soviet Union, you go through a state of totalitarianism before you get to that state of bankruptcy. I just, I don't think that you can skip that part.

Ben:

so I, I think we've been in a regime of totalitarianism that may be a velvet glove version, but

Gene:

very

Ben:

exists.

Gene:

but it's very velvet. No, I think, I think. You know, you look at the way that the, the civil the US Civil War started and I think that if any

Ben:

was the start of the US Civil War from your perspective?

Gene:

Well it's Fort Sumter, wasn't it?

Ben:

Oh, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. So, going back

Gene:

actual military action, like declar declarations happened before that. But I think here's, here's the point I'm trying to get to, which is basically Sumter, which is that if any state doesn't matter if it's Texas or anything else, says, Hey, fuck off federal government. The federal government is gonna say, okay, okay, we'll fuck off. But, you know, all the, all the natural resources in your state, they actually are American. They're not your state's property. They belong to America. And so you can't have'em and you can't prevent us from getting'em.

Ben:

Yeah, there's no legal precedent for that.

Gene:

Yeah. It's called US military. It's the same thing the US military has done in about 26 different countries in the last 50 years.

Ben:

Yeah. Well,

Gene:

Cause guess what? You wouldn't be America at that point. You'd be another country just ripe for Americans to come in and rape.

Ben:

yeah, well, we'll see. So going back to

Gene:

We won't see because people don't have the balls to actually do it.

Ben:

I don't think the US government would have the balls to go into a former US

Gene:

They've demonstrated it. They absolutely do. They've done it in other countries and they've also done it. The controlling party is the only party that's gone out with guns and torches and taken over parts of the United States with zero consequence.

Ben:

we'll see. So in the 18 in the earlier 18 hundreds, John C. Calhoun wrote a treatise on why the south was going to secede. It was South Carolina expositions and protests, definitely worth read, but really the impetus for the Civil War and what drove the South to SEC succeed. And people like to claim slavery right now, but the fact of the matter is, had the South wanted. To stay in the United States and keep slavery. All they had to do was stay. Congress admits new states. They had the power to veto any constitutional amendment, any law that would prevent, that would cause slaves to be freed. So if, if it was about slavery, all the South had to do was stay in the United States and say, yep, we're not admitting any any new states, and we are not okaying any of these laws.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

They did not have to fight a war to hold onto their slaves. What happened though, was you had the abominable tariffs. You had some things sneak in through some budgets that really taxed the hell out of the South. And that's, that's really the start of this. And Calhoun outlines that. And at one point in time, in the 1850s, stood on the co floor of Congress and said, cotton is king. Well, had the Civil War been fought in the 1840s or 1850s, there is no doubt the South would've won. And the reason why is because the South was the only source of cotton, commercial cotton in the world. the 1860s, Britain has established cotton plantations in India removed their need for the Southern.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Anyway,

Gene:

wa. Was Britain not getting cotton from Egypt at the time?

Ben:

so e Egypt and India were where they were getting their cotton, but that was transplanted there, right? It was not, it was established by the British. That's what I'm saying.

Gene:

I see what you mean. Yeah. Am.

Ben:

So in the 1830s, they did not have that, not at a commercial scale.

Gene:

Right. But by 1860s they didn't

Ben:

Right. So they, they, their reliance on the South's cotton was diminished. And that's why the British kind of were like don't know if we're gonna do this or not. But al also, interestingly enough, the British did recognize the Confederate states of America as an independent nation. And was a Confederate embassy in London.

Gene:

Yeah. And it seemed, and I don't remember the exact details, but it seemed like the British were kind of two facing that whole thing. Like they were both playing the sympathy card to the south and also happily working with the North

Ben:

Well, yeah, to an extent. They were trading arms with the south but you know, the north had the navy and were able to blockade most of the southern port. So it was a smuggling act to bring it in. You know, the north took over like Port of Galveston, for example. You know, there was lots of things.

Gene:

Got it.

Ben:

Interesting. Factoid. Did you know, do you know the first submarine to sink an enemy vessel,

Gene:

No,

Ben:

the US or the Confederate ship? Huntley was a submarine that sink. A northern vessel?

Gene:

it was a submarine. It wasn't an iron side.

Ben:

No, it, it was, it's considered a submarine because it was not, not above the water.

Gene:

Didn't they have a

Ben:

not an

Gene:

outta the water? I thought was a huh Because I know, I know a lot of the earlier iron sign were so heavy that they, they went very low in the water and had to have covered

Ben:

Right. And the, the monitor in maramac would be the most commonly known ones,

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Hmm. Yeah. That's cool. Yeah, submarines been around a lot longer than people think they have.

Ben:

the American Revolut. They were used,

Gene:

but even the way before that, in the Greek Isles they had come up with what could loosely be termed to submarine.

Ben:

mostly used for reconnaissance and sabotage up

Gene:

Now I'm going way further back for collecting pearls.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

But yeah, it was Jacque Christo did not invent people all of a sudden going under water for the first time.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

He just made a possible without a vehicle, a vessel just strap on an alon.

Ben:

Diving long before Jacque Gusto, Jato.

Gene:

yeah. Exactly. Exactly. and I still like I haven't gone diving for a damn long time, but I've always liked the variety of animal life in the sea and not just eating it

Ben:

Oh yeah.

Gene:

but I

Ben:

I mean, if you ever, if you ever get a chance to go offshore to like the flower gardens right off Galveston, that's, that's awesome. That are even some of the oil rigs, if you want to be a little closer, but.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

There's a reef that's out kind of in, not in the middle of the gulf, but it's off Texas shore pretty then comes up and it, it, it's pretty, pretty amazing.

Gene:

Yeah. Texas is a, well, the Gulf, I should say definitely has a, a good share of a lot of beautiful spots for diving or snorkeling or anything else.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

Anyway we're, we're getting off the black pill topic, goddammit, and we're talking beautiful diving. So what's wrong here? So, let's see what else is

Ben:

a little bit.

Gene:

Yeah. Oh man. Screw that white pill. Bullshit man. Black pill

Ben:

I'm dropping links in the chat for you quite a bit. I don't know if you're paying attention, but

Gene:

Oh no, I'm not paying attention. But you could bring'em up. Go for it. I was looking up a good, well, go ahead. I, I was actually just reading your stuff that you sent me previously. So you got links to what? Wikipedia, HL Huntley,

Ben:

Yeah. That, that's the sub.

Gene:

the submarine. Oh, okay. Very

Ben:

Yeah. Just showing you and then the flower gardens. Yep.

Gene:

And then, what's this one? Estimate number of civilian guns? Oh, that's the one we talked about, right? Who's got the most? Montana. Holy shit.

Ben:

Yeah. One of the, one of the really cool things on this chart, since we're going back to it, is if you look at the by country, the number of registered versus unregistered firearms, it's hilarious. So in the

Gene:

there's, there's a million machine guns in the United States, but

Ben:

considered registered and then unregistered, 392 million

Gene:

Yeah. More than people.

Ben:

Yes,

Gene:

What is the current population? I don't remember. It's under 400. Right.

Ben:

Well, according to this chart, the population as of 2017 is 326 million

Gene:

Okay. 3 31 according to Google right now.

Ben:

Right. But I'm just saying based off chart, if we're going of this chart, so

Gene:

Interesting. Yeah, no, it's wild. I would not, I mean, I guess I would, I, I guess Montana makes sense for the highest household firearms ownership population. I just didn't think Texas would be the slow

Ben:

Yeah. 30 to 40%

Gene:

holy shit. West Virginia where Tim Pool lives, where nobody should be swatting. Anybody

Ben:

Indeed.

Gene:

look at that

Ben:

even, you know, Louisiana, Arkansas, all that is more than Texas even.

Gene:

Yeah. Texas is like barely better than California in that regard.

Ben:

eh, we're way better in California

Gene:

And you're saying Texas is gonna secede, right? Right, right. Sure.

Ben:

Well, I

Gene:

Montana's got higher

Ben:

the thing. If you get rid of all the Californians in Texas, I think this could, this number looks drastically different.

Gene:

Hey, by the way did you finish watching that mini-series that the, the the beat put out with the Californians moving to Texas?

Ben:

I have not,

Gene:

Oh, okay. It's five episodes total, so I've posted all of'em on, no, on social. But people may have only watched one or two, but it's literally five episodes in total. And I think the writing was absolutely brilliant. They pick up on all the little nuances of Californians and what their reactions would be in Texas. One of the episodes was almost entirely about Buckies, which if you don't know what Buckies is, you clearly haven't been to Texas.

Ben:

So what what was the Californian's reaction to Bucky's?

Gene:

Oh. They, they couldn't believe that a place like that exists.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. And I, I always make it a point to take foreigners from states.

Ben:

it was low?

Gene:

Oh, no, no, no. They, they thought it was amazing. I mean, the whole, the whole sort of, I had to boil down the series. It's basically how Californians say something and then experience it and change their mind, but still don't want to admit that they're changing their mind. Like that's, that's kind of the central point of every episode.

Ben:

Gotcha.

Gene:

You know, like they go to the gun range and they're like all anti-guns until they start shooting guns and realize how fun it is.

Ben:

Speaking of guns,

Gene:

Oh, what'd you buy?

Ben:

Well, I didn't buy I one of Christmas gifts. I actually sent you a link earlier, but, I got a,

Gene:

little do that.

Ben:

yeah, I got a Mantis X Elite and something I would not have bought for myself. And, you know, I've used shot timers and stuff like that at the range, but

Gene:

Oh,

Ben:

never felt the need to buy one. This thing is cool. It's essentially a shot timer and accelerometer that goes on the gun either on the pico tinny rail or they've got a for the magazine, a base plate that you can put on for practicing draw. And it's an advanced accelerometer that allows you to, you know, it tells you if you're changing your grip, if you're pulling the trigger. I mean, it's very sensitive. Yeah, I mean,

Gene:

than strapping your iPhones to get now

Ben:

I'm sorry.

Gene:

better than strapping your iPhone to the gun.

Ben:

Right. And this thing's teeny, so it doesn't add any weight. It doesn't the way you're handling the

Gene:

half the size of a laser mount if

Ben:

Oh,

Gene:

lasers on their rails.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

I wondered, yeah, go ahead.

Ben:

I was just playing with it you know, dry fire and just playing with it a little bit yesterday and, you know, I've shot enough that I can kind of call my shot. I can know, okay, I, I did this, I did that, you know, I, i I can feel when I'm screwing up.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

And it, it was very accurate. Like I was surprised at the accuracy of this little thing. It, it, is one of those things that not only will I use at the range I will use at home, and I see validity in it from training this thing to me, like practicing a draw with this thing on there and looking at the data coming back from it is fantastic. Absolutely fantastic.

Gene:

So what's the interface? It's your phone or what?

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. So it, it Bluetooth pairs to your phone and then there's an app and yeah, they've got a bunch of different training scenarios, different records, different things you can do. So, yeah.

Gene:

Hmm. Cool.

Ben:

Yep. Gives you feedback on your grip, whether you're not, you're dipping or, you know, any of that. You know, trigger pull, Hey, you know, Yeah, it, it, it's it's pretty cool and it's, you know, got the shot timer in there. It's got lots of different features, so.

Gene:

Right, right, right. Okay. Yeah. That's, that's cool. I'm gonna, I look forward to checking that out. Next time we get together in person.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

So make sure you bring your gun with you.

Ben:

Well, you know what we need to do? We need to plan a little meetup here in College Station sometime at the gun range. You know, do a meetup and

Gene:

Yeah. We could plan to do a meetup in Austin too. It doesn't have to be College Station Buddy

Ben:

Okay. Well, you know,

Gene:

I like that. Conveniently right in your backyard. Let's do a.

Ben:

Well, exactly. I mean, there's already a in Austin doing meetups though. There's not a group in College Station. So, you know

Gene:

there was a group, there was somebody from College Station. You should, you know what? If you wanna do this, I'll definitely come down for it, but I think there was a couple of people in nor the social that were from College Station.

Ben:

yeah. The only college station meetup that's ha actually happened in the couple of years actually. my buddy put together.

Gene:

Oh, really? Oh, okay. Got it. So there you go. Perfect.

Ben:

So, what'd you get yourself for Christmas, Jean?

Gene:

You know, I didn't get anything. It's a, it's shocker, right?

Ben:

it's, it's like one of those things when you when you, when you don't have people to buy for and you can anything you want whenever you want, you know?

Gene:

yeah. To some extent. Yeah. I didn't get anything

Ben:

your budget,

Gene:

I was trying to remember what the, I was looking at something, but I ended up not buying it. What was I looking at? Oh, I know what it was. I was going to get something for myself for Christmas, and then I, I didn't get up early enough and I told you about this. A video

Ben:

yeah. The graphics card.

Gene:

Yeah. So I like for the next week after it came out, and this is the 7,900 Xtx from a MD Radian. which is basically the top line a m d card which is almost, but not quite as fast as the top of line Nvidia card, but for about 40% cheaper So significant difference in price. Then the AM MD card is a thousand bucks, which by the way also is crazy for a video card, but it is what it is. But the Nvidia top of the line card is 1700 bucks, which is what computers used to cost.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

insane pricing. So for about a week I kept looking and trying to snipe and I, I got it as close as putting it into my my shopping cart on New Egg. And then before I could check out, it disappeared and it said that we're sorry, this item is no longer available. And then over the last week, so it's been two weeks since it came out, I just kind of cooled off on the whole idea. I'm like, you know what? I'm just gonna wait until January when their second batch of cards shows up. There'll be plenty availability and people aren't gonna be sniping them to resell and eBay.

Ben:

I don't know. They

Gene:

That's they, well, they, they still might, but that's my game plan. I refuse to spend the money that NVIDIA charges on their top line card cuz I've had, I've had NVIDIA cards in the past and there's been plenty of issues with them just as much as they have with AM md Neither one, it's better, I don't think the Nvidia is slightly faster, but it sucks more juice outta your power supply. The AM MD is quite a bit cheaper but is almost unavailable right now at least.

Ben:

Why not just go with last year's model

Gene:

Cuz I, I have already this year's model from earlier in the year,

Ben:

Okay. So what

Gene:

I've got the, I've got the top line card that was the top line until two weeks ago,

Ben:

okay. And, and what does this new card get you that you don't already

Gene:

so it's about 35% faster,

Ben:

Okay. Functionally, what does this get you that you

Gene:

frame rates. Of course, that's what

Ben:

W what's your current frame rate? So, in,

Gene:

Depends on the game. Star citizen. It's about 45

Ben:

Okay. At what resolution?

Gene:

4k.

Ben:

Okay,

Gene:

Don't even say, wait, I think you're gonna say

Ben:

what?

Gene:

the don't, don't even mention any resolution below 4k.

Ben:

No, no, no, no. Okay. 4k. And you're getting 45 frames per second in a game that is not a first person shooter.

Gene:

Well, it has first person shooter aspects to it, but you also fly around spaceships.

Ben:

Okay. What about cyberpunk?

Gene:

Yeah. Cyberpunk. I am getting 50.

Ben:

Okay. So in a game like cyber funk,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

why is 50 not acceptable to you?

Gene:

well, my monitor's capable of 144. First of all

Ben:

eye isn't,

Gene:

my eye is, I can tell between one 20 and 1 44. It is, my eyes are very practiced in this regard. I can tell the difference between 120 and 144. Anything below that, obviously, I can also tell the difference. You know, 60 is kind of the minimum for smoothness, but when you get into the one 20 range, the smoothness stakes on a whole separate dimension that you just don't have at the 60 or f or slower frame rates.

Ben:

I remember back when I was actually into gaming and building gaming PCs and getting up to 30 frames per second and being just, oh yeah,

Gene:

Yeah. Well, apparently you were poor

Ben:

No,

Gene:

Wait, did I say that or just think that? Oh, okay. Anyway, the bottom line is there's no such thing as too fast. And with the current generation of games the. The speeds that we're getting are below what really oughta be minimal, which is 60. And this is what the top line, a MD card, which was up to two weeks ago, the top of the line. Now you were getting a little faster speeds with the top of line Invidia. Nvidia is always a little bit faster, but they're,

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

but they're well AMD's actually faster in Intel. I mean, they're, if you look at their thread, ripple line, they just blow the pants off Intel, like way better. But the, the performance for those cars, the problem with the Nvidia cards was they, they, they didn't remove the ability to mine Bitcoin with them or other crypto where you can't do that with AM MD cards. There's no mining. And so people were buying the Nvidia cards. What

Ben:

what have they done to prevent it being used for mining?

Gene:

there's certain mathematical algorithms that if you do it with the card, it, it purposefully runs at one 10th the speed,

Ben:

And why do that?

Gene:

because you don't want to have two different groups competing for this technology. Like a, like Gradon makes cards for gaming. They don't make cards for mining. Nvidia was perfectly fine selling cards for mining cuz miners can afford to pay more than retail price.

Ben:

Right? So

Gene:

is then you, you piss off your gaming base who's not gonna pay twice the money and they all go to a m d.

Ben:

card,

Gene:

Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. It's just no longer a, a gaming card. It's now a mining card.

Ben:

so,

Gene:

Well, it's not the market I'm buying the card for. I don't need to buy a mining card. I need to buy a gaming card, so therefore I'm not buying an Nvidia card.

Ben:

okay. I, I just don't

Gene:

If you have a dual purpose card, then you're having two groups compete against each other for the, the buy, which is better for the company making the card. I agree with you. what it does is it alienates the company from its core base who are now more and more of which I was one of, I moved to Nvidia like 10 years ago. And like their stuff better than I did Radian for a long time. And at this point I've moved back to AM MD because fucking Nvidia.

Ben:

Yeah, I would just wanna sell the cards and I really wouldn't care who who is buying it.

Gene:

Well, that's what they've done and I think they're gonna have a, an interesting end result because here's what's happened. Nobody's mining anymore because it's not profitable anymore cuz the all cryptos are way down and so they're, they're no longer selling cards to miners and the gamers. Who have never paid the crazy high prices that they want, that they were charging when they were selling'em to both groups are using their their dollars to vote against a company that fucked them over.

Ben:

Yeah. As soon as they come out with a feature or something that am m d doesn't have that runs whatever game better, the gamers will go back. The gamers are not loyal. They're gonna

Gene:

No, they're not loyal, but they are definitely fickle And that's what they're experiencing right now. So, yeah, we'll see. Much like I don't like supporting pedophilia Netflix, I, I don't like supporting companies that don't give a shit about me.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

So, it's, it's, it's devoting with your dollar's mentality. Plus it's cheaper to buy AM MD So there's the other argument if you don't care about all the other stuff, that, that's the other argument for it.

Ben:

Well

Gene:

so, so yeah, long story for basically saying I didn't get anything.

Ben:

so if you, when you get this card, do you think you'll be able to get to that 60 frames per second with this card? Or where, where are people landing with it? Where, where do they think,

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. It's like I said, it's about 35% faster. So take your 46 frames and multiply it by 1.35 that'll give me over

Ben:

how that works with benchmarks, but Okay.

Gene:

That's totally how it works. It's all math.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

And then that should be, bring it up to a over 60 level. And of course, as the games improve, meaning the optimization is done on the code, then those rates should keep going up. I dunno if you've ever heard of Arc survival evolved, it was a game that was pretty popular, maybe? Well, it was still popular a couple years ago, but it, it kind of came out, I guess about five, six years ago and I got it right when I was in pre-release, so it was one of the steam early access pre-release titles I remember that had like 20 frames of seconds at when it first was pre-release and got me to actually upgrade my video card to a different one. And even with that, I was still getting like a little over.

Ben:

Hmm.

Gene:

And, but as the game got closer and closer to release and they were optimizing more of the king the game code, the frame rate started going up to the point where now on the same game map where it was the slowest I mean now I'm getting over a hundred frames a second because I, obviously, I also have faster video card too, but even forgetting about the speed difference of the video card, it's even on the same card that I used to have. It'd be around 60. So there are definitely things that game companies can do to upgrade their software or to not, not upgrade, but to optimize it for faster processing. Like one of the common things, and I, and then we'll get off this boring topic for some people, one of the things that game companies often do as part of that optimization is that they, they put in rules to not render things that are occluded. So if you're, for example, inside of a building in a game and that building doesn't have glass walls, which some buildings do, but if that building doesn't have glass walls, there's no reason to render anything on the outside of the building, right? So you might as well save time and accelerate the frame rate by only rendering things that you can visually.

Ben:

are actually visible.

Gene:

Yeah. When you first start building the game, you don't give a shit about any of that stuff. So you, you literally are just rendering everything in a sphere around the person, around the player. And, and so there are things like that. That's just one example of the type of optimization that they would be doing to improve frame race later. But any early access game, you just can't expect them to be focused on that. They're focused on just building assets, improving gameplay, reducing bugs. So enough gaming news, which I think I, talk about every episode now.

Ben:

I played games and I don't know how long,

Gene:

no, I hear you. Well, you said you played cyberpunk for a little bit.

Ben:

a little bit, but I, I haven't, I haven't had time to really get into it.

Gene:

I think you took the wrong character.

Ben:

Why is that?

Gene:

Well, you said you started with the city, G City guy

Ben:

No, no, no, no, no. I, no, I didn't start with the, I started with not the, what,

Gene:

not the Corpo. Well, there's the Corpo. The Outlands, and then the city wise guy or whatever city,

Ben:

Yeah, yeah. So I guess, yes, that it did start with the city gangster or whatever you wanna

Gene:

de, or Chick.

Ben:

dude,

Gene:

Dude. Okay, so there's two mistakes right there. So I would've recommended, and since you didn't play much, if you ever pick it up, do it anyway. Just start a new game. Start with the, the Outlands Chick character. The chick character. There's two pros with, there's three pros. One looks hot, and you're gonna be looking at the back of that character whenever she's riding a motorcycle. A lot. Two acted better. The, the female that was the voice character of that character does a much better job than the male. The male is very bro, like the brewsky bro type, and not horribly realistic. It's hard to try and think of that character as, you know, as making the choices that you are making because he's totally bland and he has no reaction to anything. And then three, the storyline with romances in the game is more interesting. Not to mention, I think visually more interesting with the female character.

Ben:

Yeah. I just don't want to necessarily play a female character.

Gene:

Well, I get that and I, I generally don't for games where like, I'm the guy in the game.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

But in this game, I see it more as you're watching a movie where you get to control the outcomes.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

If I'm watching a movie, I have no problem watching a, a, you know, a hot, strong woman.

Ben:

okay.

Gene:

The, the, the, the stronger and hotter the better.

Ben:

Uhhuh.

Gene:

Plus it, it kind of gave, gave me the, the vibes of the main character in Kill Bill

Ben:

Oh, God. See, I stand those movies.

Gene:

You kidding me? Really? You didn't like Kill Bill? Oh my God. Well, you shouldn't be playing this game then at all. because a lot of that is very cyber punk.

Ben:

Okay, so why, what, what about kill Bell? Because, yeah.

Gene:

Oh, one of the best movies ever made. Awesome writing, awesome characters, beautiful choreography. They spent like months and months doing the choreographic battles. They're awesome. It

Ben:

do you like fu movies?

Gene:

yeah. I love Kung Fu movies.

Ben:

Okay. There's the disconnect.

Gene:

Oh, you know, like them,

Ben:

I, I just never have, no, not really.

Gene:

this, okay. Cyber Punk has a lot of Samurai Kung fu Ninja style. In fact, one of one of the character attributes in there is Ninja Yeah. Probably not the best game for you. It's a beautiful game though. Visually, you have to admit, even if you were only there for a little bit, the having that many NPCs walking around, you can interact with literally all of them. And then junk in the streets. Things that are like, it's all

Ben:

Very detailed game. Yes.

Gene:

Yeah. Super, super pretty.

Ben:

Kill Bill the first of all, you know, bugeyes, there is just not, never been,

Gene:

bug

Ben:

I've just never found her attractive and

Gene:

UMMA Thurman. She is not classically attractive. She's a model. She's very tall, lanky, or used to be when she was young, tall, and lanky, and had a gaunt looking face, which

Ben:

Her and

Gene:

these are all pluses for models.

Ben:

far apart.

Gene:

I don't know if they're ridiculous. You didn't like her in Pulp Fiction. You, didn't, you didn't like her in Pulp Fiction either.

Ben:

I love so I like pulp Fiction. Pulp Fiction was good. I didn't her character very

Gene:

Really? Hmm. I

Ben:

But anyway, yeah. So the kung fu

Gene:

like her in Even cowgirls. Get the blues.

Ben:

I'm sorry.

Gene:

Did you like her? And even count girls get the blues.

Ben:

I've never seen that movie.

Gene:

Oh, she plays a lesbian in that way. It's really good. Yeah. Well, it's, it's a, it was a, it was a Vanzant movie. So what were you asking? Oh, Kung fu. You never liked Kung Fu.

Ben:

man.

Gene:

when you say Kung fu, do you mean the Kung fu the TV show or Kung fu the martial art?

Ben:

The kung fu style of movies, ahah seventies, early eighties.

Gene:

Because, you know, there was a TV show with David Carine and it's who's also in Kill Bill called Kung Fu.

Ben:

Yeah. So, you know, I, I like martial arts, so I'm, I I did a lot of martial arts growing up. I

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

competed, I've, you know,

Gene:

Which one did you do?

Ben:

Well, I've done several. I've done, I have a black belt in TaeKwonDo and then I've done judo.

Gene:

Any real ones?

Ben:

I'm sorry.

Gene:

Nevermind, go ahead.

Ben:

I've done judo and Juujitsu.

Gene:

Oh, okay. All right. But you have a blackmail in Taek Kwon TaeKwonDo though, because a lot of people don't really consider that a real martial art.

Ben:

Okay. Well, I mean, that's what I started off as kid,

Gene:

Yeah. That's what most kids, I think, are gonna more likely to

Ben:

You know,

Gene:

did judo and you did jujitsu,

Ben:

yeah. And you know, I've done various sorts of wrestling in high school and stuff like that as

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Huh? Didn't we all

Ben:

yeah. Collegiate and freestyle and yeah. You know, I I've played around with a little craf, but I didn't like it very much. I thought it was just,

Gene:

I got tired of getting kicked in the balls.

Ben:

no, I just thought it was stupid. The way people, you know, here, here's the thing, if you wanna go get the shit beat outta ya, just go start a fight, you know? But you're going to exercise and learn something, don't think getting the shit beat outta ya is a good way to do that.

Gene:

Hmm.

Ben:

So I think you're gonna learn effective fighting techniques. You know, having to go, the, the idea of going full contact all the time and just beating the crap outta each other just doesn't appeal to me. Now if we want to do a full contact sparring match every now and then. Sure. Absolutely. But, you know, I,

Gene:

Well, the only one I've ever done.

Ben:

A fighter. I'm not going to be, and I don't want to have the bruises of one every week.

Gene:

Right, right, right. Yeah. No, I can see that. Yeah. The, on, the only one I've done is muai

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

and I broke three fingers doing that,

Ben:

Oh yeah. I've, I've,

Gene:

it was pretty heavy contact.

Ben:

yeah,

Gene:

But you also learned not to block feet with hands.

Ben:

yes. Well, depending on how you're doing it, and, you know, arms not hands necessarily, but so I tore my Achilles tendon doing TaeKwonDo.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

I've broken bones, I've done lots of things, so,

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Well, the important question is did you keep fighting? Did you fight

Ben:

Did keep what?

Gene:

Did you keep fighting? Did you fight through the pain?

Ben:

Oh, I've done lots of things. Yeah. I ended up, I didn't realize I had torn it. It was only a partial tear on my Achilles and, you know, days later it was still hurting me and the, you know, had limited mobility and went to the doctor and Sure.

Gene:

Yeah. Says Oh, your, your ankle bones not connected to anything, son.

Ben:

Well, it, it was, I I was, it was just hanging on.

Gene:

You ever see anybody that got their Achilles cut?

Ben:

Oh yeah. You can't move your foot.

Gene:

Y no. You fall over and the Yeah. fall over right It's such an underrated takedown. I don't know what's not used, Mar.

Ben:

I mean, literally there's an, a myth about it and everything else. Right.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, that's true. Anyway, so martial arts I think are, are good for kids to get into. They're, they're good form of exercise.

Ben:

A Anyway, my point in saying that was, having grown up doing martial arts and everything else, I always found, you know, the kung fu and the karate movies just hokey and campy and bullshit and, yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. But, you know, they're, they're movies,

Ben:

Okay. I, I never liked them. So. Yeah. Anyway, hence why I didn't like kill Bill, which we've spent way too much time on this topic.

Gene:

Yeah, fair enough. I just, I don't know, I like killed Bill, but anyway so you, yeah. Had I known this dude, I probably would not have recommended

Ben:

Cyber

Gene:

that you get into cyberpunk. Yeah. Because that the, I think if you were totally neutral to kung fu

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

and you like the pretty looking game, then you'd probably be a little more into it. But if you dislike Kung fu

Ben:

well, say I dislike, so like Bruce Lee, some of the Bruce Lee stuff was okay, but saying in general, I've, it's, I've ne it's, it's never something that's had a draw to How about that?

Gene:

Got it. So you're, you're not a big fan of John Clavin Domino.

Ben:

Van Dam is very different than kung fu and you know, even like Chuck Norris is different.

Gene:

Yeah, well, but they're, they're all part of that late seventies, early eighties. Look at these dudes. They know how to use martial arts movies.

Ben:

Well, again, I'm not opposed to martial arts. I'm opposed Anyway. Yeah. So the, there are definitely some, some movies, I guess if you want to throw those into the kung fu genre, which I don't think are, but you know, that where Chuck Norris Bruce Lee and Van Dam, you know, I definitely.

Gene:

Yeah. Well, so you, you, is it the Asian movies or the American Kung fu movies that you dislike?

Ben:

I would say the American Kung Fu movies, depending on what your, what, what you would classify in that.

Gene:

Huh? Well, I'm just trying to get at what movies you saw that kind of turned you off of that. Because if you like Bruce Lee, that was certainly kung fu and it was in the seventies.

Ben:

Yeah. Some of the Bruce Lee stuff is okay. Some of it's me, but anyway,

Gene:

Yeah. Actually had lunch at the Bruce Lee Cafe that his family still own.

Ben:

So interestingly enough, my passport will be here Wednesday.

Gene:

Oh, cool. Are you gonna go fly and learn macra in in in the holy lands now?

Ben:

Yeah. No, I'm not gonna do that.

Gene:

Yeah. No,

Ben:

Yeah, no, no. I it's gonna be interesting to see where my first trip takes me. I have a feeling it's gonna be a toss up, whether

Gene:

Now are you allowed talk about this stuff?

Ben:

To an extent. To an extent, I'm gonna keep it just, know, vague, vague and basic. But I'm, I may be going to the Middle East, or I may be going to Southeast Asia. It depends on which one ends up coming through first.

Gene:

Well, those are both places.

Ben:

yeah. Yeah. Singapore is in my future, and so is,

Gene:

never been, but it's Singapore just sounds awesome.

Ben:

Yeah. It, it does sound like an interesting,

Gene:

thriving cultural and very wealthy area.

Ben:

Well, I mean, you have a dictatorship that allows free market economics to, to

Gene:

the best kind of dictatorship really, if you think about it.

Ben:

Yeah. I, I don't know that I want a dictatorship of any kind, but if I

Gene:

Well, I've often thought it would be

Ben:

Singapore would be up there. I'm sorry,

Gene:

I've often thought it'd be fun to be a dictator.

Ben:

I'm, I'm sure being a dictator is fun. I just don't wanna live under a dictator.

Gene:

Right. You're not living there, you're just traveling there.

Ben:

Exactly.

Gene:

Yeah. You're just supporting the dictatorship, that's all.

Ben:

Yeah. Anyway, the new, the new job is definitely gonna take me to to a lot of different places. company I'm working for has operations in 70 countries,

Gene:

the company. Got it. Okay.

Ben:

yeah, 70 countries, man, 70

Gene:

At least. Yeah, that makes sense.

Ben:

Yeah, I, you know, someone asked me on this on no agenda social oh, you cia? No, no, no. I, I have avoided government work and government clearances my life because I disdain them,

Gene:

Yeah. Governments suck. It's much better to be a freelancer.

Ben:

exactly. And you know, a lot of people are like, oh, but you can get government briefs on threats and all this yeah. If you're actually in cybersecurity and actually in the business usually the private sector, open source intelligence is better than the government intelligence that they're gonna share with you.

Gene:

sorry. As we're recording, Luke, just put out a video about France and Paris protests.

Ben:

Oh, yeah.

Gene:

Yeah, I, I'm not gonna watch it during the middle of our recording session, but it might be something checkout right afterwards

Ben:

Okay. Yeah. Speaking of cybersecurity though do you wanna talk about the last pass breach at all?

Gene:

Yeah, let's do that.

Ben:

So this, this is something that I think is getting blown out of the water.

Gene:

Okay.

Ben:

know, and people are saying, why use a centralized thing when you can use your your browser isn't

Gene:

my, that's my take. No, don't use a browser. Use your fucking head. Do you not have a brain,

Ben:

Well, I mean, last pass and I, I, I'll flat out say it, I've been a last pass user for a long time, and guess what? I'm not worried about this breach. And the reason why is depending on how you configured your last pass vault, this is a big nothing burger. And here's why. Number one my last pass master password is extremely long. Number two, I have multifactor authentication that is associated with it. And number three, I change the number of hashes that are done. So even if someone had a rainbow table for the last pass default, I do not fall into that category of the last pass defaults. So what that means is, and this is all configurable in last pass, and if you're smart enough to go through and do it and you don't have your vault where your password can be recovered, you take responsibility for that you're pretty damn safe. So yeah, I'm sure that during this they may have gotten a copy of my, an encrypted copy of my password vault. Good luck.

Gene:

I think this is the good stuff you're saying. However, just to be a devil's advocate here,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

have you looked at the source code

Ben:

I have not looked at the source

Gene:

you really have no idea what information they're passing back to headquarters and how they're storing it. You're just taking their marketing has worked for it.

Ben:

No, no, no, no. So part of the way the extension works, and there's lots of hooks and tie-ins where we can see this, they have had third party audits. You can review the third party audits, and you know, a bit warden's a great example of open source that could be just as good. Back in the day before LogMeIn bought last Pass, I actually had some communication with the guy who came up with it and talked with him about what he was doing, how he was implementing it, and so on. And, you know, now it's been bought by LinkedIn Link or LogMeIn, sorry, LogMeIn. And they could have changed whatever in the code base they wanted. But realistically, LastPass has been pretty damn good about this. Here's the thing. I don't think that they're a target for governments wanting necessarily a backdoor because I think they've got pretty much back doors to anything else they would want. I, I think there are many ways of doing this. You know, if I were going to be a government trying to. Get as many people's passwords and everything as I could. I would rather insert myself into the Google or Apple keyboard than anything else because no matter what password manager you're using, or even if you're like you using your brain, you have access. So,

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, hardware is obviously a great way to get in if you can do that. But I, I don't know, I just, I don't like the concept of just having one password and then every, every other password is just put it by the, the system based on that one password.

Ben:

Well what I like is each website I go to, I can generate a long cryptographically sound password that I don't have to remember.

Gene:

yeah, yeah. And that's, that's useful. That's handy. But I don't know that. You're really like what you give up in order to achieve that seems to me like a single point of failure.

Ben:

Well again, so this point of failure failed. Yet the crypto, if they are doing what they have said they are doing from a cryptographic standpoint, and they have not changed things substantially and lied about it, if they are doing what they said they are doing, so what that's point of cryptography is, you know, the algorithm can be known and it not matter.

Gene:

yeah.

Ben:

So, and this is another thing that people need to keep in mind is that when it comes to your password, link trump's entropy. So what I mean by that is the longer password is going to be harder to break than a shorter password that is nothing but randomness. So you want some entropy in there. Generally what I do is, you know, eight characters of just generated crap and then add on a phrase or a quote or something and have that eight characters of randomness somewhere in the mix. And then a longer list. And you know what that gets you is just compute time. And again, talking about rainbow tables, because long ago when rainbow tables were invented, you had this shift from the time memory trade off, right? Hard drive started getting cheaper. You could store terabytes and terabytes of rainbow tables and you know, this is where salting hashes had to come in. This is where, you know,

Gene:

Okay, we're getting into technical terms. So Rainbow Table is basically a table that maps,

Ben:

maps a hash to the

Gene:

to a password

Ben:

instead of

Gene:

adds extra bullshit stuff at the end

Ben:

to change that.

Gene:

to obfuscate it. Yeah.

Ben:

So if you hash one, two. That hash, depending on the hash algorithm you're using, is always gonna come out as 1, 2, 3. Now, a hash is an a non-reversible thing, right? So you can't go from whatever the hash is to 1, 2, 3. But what you can do with a rainbow table is basically a lookup. So you s okay, I have this hash, what's the password? Oh, it's 1, 2, Salt would be added to the end. So, a string of characters added to the end so that without knowing that string of characters, it, you know, it fakes it out. The other thing is, like I said in the last pass settings, changing the default number of times your password is hashed because every time you hash a hash, a hash, a hash, that changes the values. So by changing that default, which if you're an attacker and trying to go for the biggest swath of users, you're gonna go for the default. So now not only is my password length protecting me, but the number of hashes that have to be done and me not publishing that number or the exact length of my password keeps me pretty damn safe is all I'm saying.

Gene:

So back, this may have been before your time probably was, but Windows NT had a some bad choices that were made about the hash table,

Ben:

Yep, landman.

Gene:

yeah. And so at one point I actually had the full NT four Rainbow table every possible combination that you could possibly get in there. So effectively rendering all passwords, useless.

Ben:

so what happened there was that any password over four characters was broken up into essentially chunks. So essentially you were developing for NT four and Landman, which unfortunately still lingers around today in my industry. But you know, basically you had, you didn't have to do for an eight character password. You didn't have to do a rainbow table for eight characters. You had to do Rainbow Table for four characters. You know, and that's really where I in win, even up through Windows xp. That's why getting over that eight character password really kind of started to make a difference. But yeah, there were, there were some very poor choices back then.

Gene:

Yeah. But my, my only point there was that there, there's always. A, it's not really a war, I guess it's a little bit of a battle between hackers and security developers in trying to push their side further. So the hackers are constantly looking for ways to find human mistakes in this stuff. And the security developers are constantly looking for ways to improve the security of their products, because that gives'em a marketing advantage. So it's, it's always fun to watch the progression of that and see which side is actually winning. And I, I'm, you know, I'm kind of only half kidding when I said, well, have you seen the source code? Because that is the default sort of pushback question from the hacker side. Anytime somebody talks about a commercial product rather than an open source product and the, is the trust factor in it, it's like, yeah, if somebody's using a commercial security product, you can't trust it unless you've looked at the source code. And of course, the source is not available, therefore you just, period, you can't trust it.

Ben:

well, what I would say to that is, okay, did you compile your operating system?

Gene:

And, and about 40% of these guys will say yes. Yes. They compiled own operating

Ben:

and I'll call bullshit. I, dude, I'm a,

Gene:

Dude, I, I've recompiled the Linux colonel plenty of times.

Ben:

I, I'm a free BSD guy. I have done Build World. Okay, I get it. But at the same time, what I'd say is open source software, unless you. Manually reviewing it and enough to be able to review it. You know, doing a software audit I is very difficult. So like back in the true crypt days, now we've got, Vera Crypt has gone through some, several source code audits and things like that. That's something I can and will trust. But I don't see how a closed source tool is any different if it goes through the audit, because I'm not going to go through and audit the code myself on an open source project. And there are

Gene:

But I don't think that's the

Ben:

and hundreds of open projects that are not audited.

Gene:

that that's true, but the ability to audit at any point in time at your discretion with open source is one of the differences that they

Ben:

Yes. Except those audits don't typically happen.

Gene:

Well, that's, that's whose fault it's that.

Ben:

And I will say this, most programmers are not capable of doing a security audit of software, especially code that is especially code that is highly commented. And the reason why is because as you're reviewing it, you tend to get into groupthink. It's like reading a book. You, you fall into the thought patterns of the book, right?

Gene:

Yeah. I'm, I'm from the the old School of programming back in the eighties where comments take too much disk space,

Ben:

Mm-hmm. well,

Gene:

If I, if nobody needs to know what my code does, except for me, so why would I comment it?

Ben:

Well, anyway, the, the point I'm making is that people put too much value in open source as a security thing.

Gene:

Yeah, I agree with you I'm just, like I said, I'm being devil's advocate here.

Ben:

yeah, yeah. It also means like Bit warden. Bit Warden is a great, think open, so source alternative to Last Pass. I've been a LastPass user for many years. There's some advantages and some reasons why I choose to do this.

Gene:

There's a BSD version of Last Pass.

Ben:

I'm sorry,

Gene:

There's a free BSD version of Last Pass.

Ben:

Who is using free BSD and User Land as a No one? No, no, no, no. I use it for different projects,

Gene:

oh, so what do you use for desktop? Windows

Ben:

No, I have I'm on Windows right now because of motu, still trying to get the Lennox drivers but I usually use a Lennox variant.

Gene:

Okay. So when you say I'm a free BSD guy, you're just trying to flex?

Ben:

No, I'm saying that I, I mean, I literally have free b several free BSD boxes running here at the house and open BSD for that

Gene:

headless

Ben:

they perform different functions.

Gene:

Headless servers.

Ben:

Yeah. Y you know, there, there's, there's a lot of reasons and rationale for it. Anyway PF is a fantastic firewall and I've been a big fan of pfn and those guys at Net Gate for a long time. So

Gene:

All right. Well, let's on from boring topic.

Ben:

my point on the bit warden thing. Last thing, and then we can is, you know, bit Warden has you know, un until they have audits and do a code freeze, that being open source can be an advantage for an attacker. Because anytime that you're reading a spec or know, a code code for a security product, anytime you see must or shell in a spec, or anytime you see a check sum in code, you immediately go and validate that they've done it correctly. Right?

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Because if they haven't, that's, that's the first step in any exploit. So,

Gene:

And I, I, I would say, and this is not based on anything I've read, just personal sort of historical stuff, is that the vast majority of what are things referred to as hacking in the news are actually social engineering.

Ben:

yeah. That or very rudimentary. you know, developing a brand new zero day is pretty uncommon.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. and well, but, but I mean like, 10,000 passwords or a million passwords hacked from so-so company. Yeah. Usually they were socially engineered and not hacked. Like people gained legitimate access. Illegitimately, somebody had the access and somebody who shouldn't have had the access talk their way into getting it. It was not some piece of code that they uploaded that, you know, did all this in the background automatically, or some bullshit. People are much easier to hack than computers.

Ben:

Well, and here's the thing, you know, when you look at like few years back, the faffing, you know, and everybody's

Gene:

Oh, that was a fun, enjoyable experience. Yes.

Ben:

I'm sorry,

Gene:

That was an enjoyable thing.

Ben:

It, it was interesting. But, you know, stuff like that still persists to this day where, you know, people are trusting iCloud and iPhone back up and

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

man when will politicians and celebrities learn?

Gene:

right? No, I've got my phone banking up to my Sonology server.

Ben:

Yeah. Like my, my phone doesn't back up to Google photo or anything like that. Why would I do that? You know? No.

Gene:

Well, a better question is why are you taking photos of you with the book? Plug in Your Ass? I don't mean you, I mean Jennifer Lawrence, but I mean, it's a hot photo, don't get me wrong, but it's literally a selfie of her showing her ass with a butt plug.

Ben:

She was sending it to someone.

Gene:

She was clearly sending it to someone. Exactly. She wasn't doing this just document for historical purposes for herself. She was sending this to someone

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

how, and these are the same people that are giving advice on covid and telling people to mask up and get a jab five times.

Ben:

There you go.

Gene:

Really? So I, I just

Ben:

So while we're on that topic, I've got a topic that was pretty funny.

Gene:

Jennifer Lawrence.

Ben:

No. The things that people's rectum,

Gene:

Oh, okay. Go ahead.

Ben:

did you see the story about the bomb scare at a hospital in France?

Gene:

It didn't make any sense to me. Explain it.

Ben:

You saw it or you didn't

Gene:

I saw the headline. That's far as I got.

Ben:

so apparently this 80 year, year old man took a World War I shell, and shoved it up there and it got

Gene:

And how big was this shell?

Ben:

pretty damn big.

Gene:

Well, is it like a 50 cow or was it bigger

Ben:

no, no, bigger. Bigger, like water bottle size, bigger.

Gene:

water bottle size Shell. Okay, so this is like something dropped from the airplane.

Ben:

Correct.

Gene:

Okay? And it was live

Ben:

apparently bomb squad was called in.

Gene:

and this guy put it up his ass

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

or somebody put it up his ass.

Ben:

My theory is he just wanted to go out with a bang,

Gene:

Bum pump

Ben:

Sorry,

Gene:

I need to have that, that sound effect somewhere.

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

God, I just

Ben:

Anyway. No, it, it, it is just like, it, it, it goes back to the nineties and some of the stories around the Gerb bowls and things like that is what it

Gene:

Oh yeah. Richard gear turbo, man. Hmm?

Ben:

you know,

Gene:

don't,

Ben:

did South

Gene:

yeah. Yes. South Park did that. Oh my God. That whole journey of the magical gerbil.

Ben:

Yes.

Gene:

Yeah. That's so sick. So sick. I don't think live thing. Well, first and foremost I don't think a whole lot belongs in your ass. That didn't come out of there naturally. But you know, putting in an inert piece of stainless steel with a gem face on it is one thing. Everybody knows what I'm talking about. Putting in live munitions in your ass, that's a whole different thing. and that's like next level. But putting a live animal up your ass, that's a whole other level beyond that. That's just, I don't, I, that, that's not even sex. That's some kind of weird science fiction shit To have another animal inside of you for pleasure.

Ben:

it's dystopian and just totally, I mean, anyway, we are in interesting and bizarre times. sent a link to the New York Post article,

Gene:

The Which one?

Ben:

the New York Post article, so you can see the shell,

Gene:

Oh, the Shell. Oh, okay, okay, okay. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I I have to see how big this thing is. Is it only a vi Oh my God, you gotta be me. This, is literally a water bottle.

Ben:

no, no. Scroll down and you can see the shell.

Gene:

Holy. No, I'm, I'm looking, I'm looking at it, but it looks like a water bottle.

Ben:

N not on the x-ray. Keep going down. There's the actual image.

Gene:

I'm, I'm seeing it. Yeah. It's pretty bad.

Ben:

Oh,

Gene:

why would that be in some dude's ass?

Ben:

You know, I don't know if anyone thought to ask the question,

Gene:

So if you're gonna put something up your ass, I would think, and maybe I'm wrong on this, but I would think putting a device intended and manufactured for that purpose would be, Something with no sharp corners

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

and hey, how about this? Maybe something that even vibrates, right? Because presumably the whole reason for putting something up there is that the friction is creating a sensation that's enjoyable. I mean, I guess you could argue taking a a nice big poop could be enjoyable. I could see that you feel kinda lighter as a of that, but but it's just like inert weird, strange, inert objects up the ass. Just make no sense to me. Like, are you either too lazy or too poor to just buy some kind of anal toy that's, you know, made for that purpose that is not going to harm you. And it's not an animal it's just weird, man. It's weird, but I also don't understand a lot of other things that people do. Like, I don't understand nose rings. know, I, I barely understand tattoos. Like I, I've seen some that are pretty, but 99% of'em make the person look like shit,

Ben:

Well, they're permanent.

Gene:

yeah. Yeah. And you know, the, the chick with the blue hair and the shave size of the head not attractive whatsoever, but at least it's not. like, you can fix that. You can, you can grow your hair out and let it go back to a more natural color.

Ben:

the shave sides of the head just drive it. Just, I, I don't how that is becoming

Gene:

it's like I'm not actually lesbian, but I, I wanna be edgy and pretend to be kind of lesbian ish

Ben:

Yeah.

Gene:

is what it tells me. Maybe I'm wrong on unless interpretation, but it's kind of what it is. Something I've said for most of my life that I think is, to me, surprisingly surprising how oblivious women are to this. A good 50% of female attractiveness lies in their hair. This is what we genetically as men are programmed to be attracted to because health of hair is an indicator of the health of the woman. And that matters if you're going to have her get impregnated with your kid. you as a caveman don't want a woman who is balding or has crappy hair because she's not healthy, so you don't want to provide for her because she's gonna be raising your kid. you want is somebody with a good hips, waist ratio, and really good, strong, beautiful hair.

Ben:

Yep.

Gene:

we genetically as males have evolved to be attracted to.

Ben:

Well, hair, and hair health also goes a long way to, you know, nutrition and how your, your

Gene:

abso Well, that's exactly, exactly right. It's nutrition. When the hair is healthy, it means the person's getting the, the kinds of vitamins and minerals they need. And bit, which, you know, you could tell I have a healthy set of hair because I take bite every day.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

Well, it doesn't make my nails grow too long. Well, that's a different issue that has more to do with testosterone. But for women, they don't have testosterone or at least as much of it. And so that is not gonna be tied to testosterone levels that whether they have good hair or not on top of their heads, it's gonna be tied more to whether they're getting proper nutrition or not. So everything else like buzz cuts side of the hair, shaved you know, just short hair in general. Like, there's a reason that when you look around, the average 40, 50, 60 year old woman has short hair, the reason they will tell you if you ask them is because they got tired of trying to, you know, keep their hair. looking good. And it's just a lot easier with short hair, which is a totally true statement, but it's not really up to them. They're not the ones making this decision. This is a differentiating factor that basically says, I've got menopause and I'm no longer fertile. Men are not attracted to women with short hair and women with short hair can't have kids. So what's really weird is when you have young women pretending to look like somebody that genetically men shouldn't be attracted to, that, that to me is the bizarre part.

Ben:

Jean and sir jean speaks.com.

Gene:

It's all biological information. This is incontrovertible. There's nothing to argue here at all. Short hair on the same woman, same physical body, same face. Short hair makes that woman drop down in the attractiveness scale if you ask random men to rate her there. There've been tons of studies done on this. Yeah. And you know, for certain men,

Ben:

about it from the seventies.

Gene:

oh yeah. What was it called?

Ben:

Oh, now I'm gonna have to go look it up. You keep

Gene:

Oh, I've never heard of that song. No, I was gonna say that, you know, other factors like color of the hair can have positive or nat negative attributes. Like the color blue is a very unnatural color. So while you may think, well, that's kind of neat, I like that look subconsciously it indicates a lack of health. So somebody with blue hair is not going to be seen as a good long-term partner, even though they might be seen as a good short-term. Fuck.

Ben:

Hmm. Yeah. right.

Gene:

but okay, go ahead.

Ben:

In the chat.

Gene:

Oh, you found the YouTube of it.

Ben:

literally called hair.

Gene:

Oh, by the cows Kills.

Ben:

I, I guess, I don't know. But there was a Simpsons

Gene:

I hate seventies. Sounds like this.

Ben:

huh?

Gene:

Why am a hairy guy? Okay.

Ben:

No, this is not the right song. Damnit. Nevermind

Gene:

That is so typical seventies music, man.

Ben:

yeah. Anyway, so, Hey, there was some good music in the seventies.

Gene:

There is, there's some good music, but it's, but it's surrounded by music that isn't

Ben:

Well, same thing with the eighties.

Gene:

eighties, had all awesome music. There's nothing bad in the eighties that happened.

Ben:

You're joking,

Gene:

No, the eighties is the best, the best decade for music. This has been proven and controversially.

Ben:

No, no, no, it has not

Gene:

Absolutely.

Ben:

now. Seventies music's way better than eighties

Gene:

Oh my God. Not even close. Not even close. No. Seventies music mostly sounds the same. It's all shit. It better. Mm-hmm.

Ben:

blues pretty, you know, pretty unique and yeah, I don't know.

Gene:

Uhhuh, Yeah. Eighties revolutionized music for the better. And the nineties just took a big, big old dump on music and turned it on into depression.

Ben:

Well, I mean, nineties country was good, you know, Bob Seger

Gene:

yeah. I guess I didn't really listen to country in the nineties. I listened to country in the eighties.

Ben:

Eighties country, nineties country was all good. Even early two thousands now, you know, like Taylor Swift, it's not country music.

Gene:

no, it's rock,

Ben:

No, it's pop.

Gene:

it's pop, whatever. Yeah, it's pop rock, but it is pop. Pop is better than rock. You're right.

Ben:

No. Rock. Rock and roll, man.

Gene:

No, no, definitely not. What passes for rock and roll these days is not really rock and roll. Anyway.

Ben:

Okay. What do you, what, what is rock and

Gene:

Elvis is rock.

Ben:

Yeah. I like Elvis some.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

You know, I like Bob Seeger. I like,

Gene:

That's Folk

Ben:

huh?

Gene:

Bob Seager. That's folk music.

Ben:

No.

Gene:

That's folkish.

Ben:

Okay. Anyway,

Gene:

But

Ben:

music, but

Gene:

no, I do too. I, I like a lot of music. I grew up listening to mostly classical and then obviously unavoidable what was on the radio. But I do think that if I have to, well, in fact I do this all the time. If I have to put something on for background music, I'll put on the eighties station, or lately what I've been doing, which is even better, is there's eighties sounding original music that is, that I, that I buy license for, that I can listen to So it's, it's like never before heard eighties music.

Ben:

so on classical, who do you like?

Gene:

So I'm I like Beethoven. I like Bach. I like a lot of

Ben:

I mean, you

Gene:

guess it depends, you like Renaissance.

Ben:

Chaikovsky

Gene:

I don't really like OV Ski. Nope. Not I, he wouldn't be on my top 10. He'd be like on somewhere lowered on the list.

Ben:

Interesting.

Gene:

I like handle, handle is good. Hayden's good. But I think if I was, it depends on the mood, you know, with classical music. I think a lot of it is dependent on what kind of mood or feeling I'm in.

Ben:

Interesting. So you're very much more the Austrian style then?

Gene:

Probably. Yeah.

Ben:

Yeah. Okay. Well, think we've probably bored everyone to

Gene:

the romantics?

Ben:

Some, yeah. I, I mean, Beethoven's great. I, I'm not a huge Mozart fan, but you can't, you can't appreciate classical music and not just

Gene:

But you can't not hear Mozart, cuz every public radio station plays him all the time.

Ben:

Exactly. Be, I mean, because it's just so prolific and just

Gene:

I'd say Mozart is the pop music of his generation. Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Yeah. Yeah,

Gene:

Yeah. I like the guy who played Saul Yari in the movie Mozart in the movie Amadeus.

Ben:

Oh man. If you, if that's an old enough movie, surely everybody's seen it. But if you haven't it is awesome.

Gene:

Yeah. No spoilers. That's gotta come out in the eighties, right?

Ben:

Or early nineties.

Gene:

or Yeah,

Ben:

yeah. That in like the Lonesome Dove miniseries from the nineties, that was too. Did you ever watch that?

Gene:

No,

Ben:

You haven't seen the lonesome dove miniseries?

Gene:

no. I didn't really watch TV in the nineties, dude.

Ben:

do go find the lonesome dove miniseries?

Gene:

Really?

Ben:

Yes, absolutely.

Gene:

84 Ames came out in 84.

Ben:

Yeah. The Lonesome Dove miniseries is fantastic. You've seen the the stand miniseries, right?

Gene:

No,

Ben:

Ah,

Gene:

dude, I didn't have a television for most of my life.

Ben:

same here.

Gene:

Well, okay.

Ben:

You know, so, but yeah. But you're like getting on me to watch community yet, you

Gene:

community is hilarious. It's, it's not funny to the average American. It had crappy ratings, but it is basically nonstop memeing for an hour or, you know, 45 minutes, whatever it is per episode. But it, it's, it's only appreciated by people who have a very broad understanding of American culture and movies.

Ben:

So how, why do you like it?

Gene:

I like it because

Ben:

You

Gene:

a lot of the movies that, that are mentioned and a lot of the references are obscure things, which is where I tend to gravitate to. You know, it's more, it's, it's more stuff that is I don't know, watch five episodes. If you don't like it, stop. But after five episodes, I think you'll be hooked for the whole season or the whole series. It's seven season.

Ben:

Okay.

Gene:

The first four are the best, as usual. The, the, these things never end when they should. They always end a

Ben:

try to on a little too long. Yeah.

Gene:

Yeah. But the characters are all very interesting. There's there's the sort of sports jock who's actually not really into sports. There's the, the lawyer that turned out never got his degree and therefore lost his legal license. There's the the, the black woman who's like a I guess she'd be in her mid thirties, late thirties mother with kids who's gone back to college. There's the, the girl that ended up having to go to rehab instead of going to college after high school and is trying to catch up before transferring to a real college. And then there's the, the girl that all of us, I'm sure had met in college that is into all the causes, all of them and, and this little group. Oh, and the old rich guy who is completely politically incorrect. And is just going to take classes in college to pass the time. that, that's the full group of people.

Ben:

so Jean, is this how you is this your dating profile essentially?

Gene:

dating profile. Which one?

Ben:

The,

Gene:

disbarred lawyer.

Ben:

no, the old rich guy

Gene:

Oh, they're old rich guy. Well, he wasn't getting a whole lot of girls in college. But Chevy Chase plays the old guy.

Ben:

Oh, great. one, one of the movies we watched this weekend was definitely National Lampoons

Gene:

Oh, there you go. So you know who Chevy Chase is in?

Ben:

Of course, I know who Chevy

Gene:

Yeah. He used to be an actor.

Ben:

Spies like one of his best movies.

Gene:

that was one of the Yeah, that was an awesome movie. Him and Dan Akroyd in that movie were absolutely fabulous as civil servants before that whole profession just got corrupt with politics.

Ben:

Oh, I think it's been corrupt for a long time. Hey, what did you think about Kennedy coming out and saying, you know, the CIA murdered my uncle

Gene:

Yeah. I, well it's about time.

Ben:

took

Gene:

I mean, we all kind of been talking about this, right. So

Ben:

Right. But, you know,

Gene:

it's makes total sense cuz he was on the verge of shutting down that military industrial complex.

Ben:

Yeah. Tur Tucker Carlson coming out and talking about the CIA and everything else,

Gene:

Well, Tucker's living in his basement, so he's one of the few people that can do that.

Ben:

yeah.

Gene:

You know, that studio is in his basement. Right.

Ben:

right, right. But bringing up the links between you know, not only

Gene:

It was such an unbelievable story. Like

Ben:

yeah. Well, anyone who, anyone who's been to the book repository and sees where Oswald took the quote, unquote,

Gene:

Or even the depository story story,

Ben:

huh.

Gene:

even the Daz story.

Ben:

Repository, depository, whatever. Anyway.

Gene:

it's the

Ben:

Well, here the books were kept anyway. The, the, the shot took was, yeah. The, the shots he took were unnecessarily difficult, well, unnecessarily difficult. So when the motorcade was coming directly at him, would've been the shots if I were sitting there wanting to that, that's when I would've shot. Not when they're going

Gene:

would you even be that high up? I wouldn't be that high up, man.

Ben:

I wouldn't be that high up either.

Gene:

Shot of high up.

Ben:

very, and to get three rounds off with that rifle, that, like, that is just, anyway the Zapruder film is pretty interesting on it. The Oswald's

Gene:

And, and the shrubs and the grassy know will make for a much better location to take that shot up

Ben:

Yeah. The guy who who, who was the guy that killed Oswald? What was his name?

Gene:

Oh the Mafia guy.

Ben:

Ties cia and then the doctor that the doctor that was involved with both Kennedy and Oswald ties to the cia.

Gene:

Yep. Yeah. It's funny how

Ben:

W. Bush can't rem or George h w Bush can't remember where he was when Kennedy was killed.

Gene:

no, no. Can't remember at all. And you know, it, it's just, it's funny how some people just choose to commit suicide with two bullets to the back of the head.

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

It's funny how that happens.

Ben:

Well, you know, I, I think with the Carry Lake stuff, with stuff like this coming out and people taking the, oh, so what we kind of already knew that mentality. I think there are a lot of people going n no, we didn't. No, no, we did. Wait, what? Huh. I think the average Joe, if they're saying this, which some of them are, some of them aren't. Are really, I, I don't know. I talk to some people who seem pretty incensed by things.

Gene:

You mean like, presidential assassinations and stealing elections, that kind of thing?

Ben:

Yeah. And it just being in their face and not really, I mean, it, it's not even conspiracy theory anymore at this point.

Gene:

No. Nope. But much as the FBI said in their TW tweet, when the allegations came up against'em and meddling in elections directly, in fact, paying for it to Twitter said, it's unfortunate that conspiracy theorists are trying to make our good name you know, be bad. Like, that's literally their only response. There's no denials. There's no explanations. It's just, it, it's simply saying, Hey, the conspiracy theorists start a bad guys here. I, we just wanna make sure everybody knows that that's the bad guys. They're probably the ones that are responsible for the overthrow of the US government. And then the biggest attack on the United States since the Civil War,

Ben:

Yeah. Which the Civil War was not an attack on the United States, but Yes.

Gene:

Mm-hmm. it's attacked by the United States,

Ben:

Exactly.

Gene:

And with that, I got nothing else, man.

Ben:

Cool.

Gene:

So, have a, a good Now we're gonna be back on track here with your new job. Hopefully you'll have equipment you can bring with you

Ben:

Yeah. All right.

Gene:

destinations.

Ben:

Yeah, I actually ordered the microphone. You gotten tested and, sounded pretty good. So it won't be r e three 20

Gene:

it It was pretty good.

Ben:

Yeah, it was pretty decent.

Gene:

Yeah. And it certainly less crap to carry. The one thing I will say is the stand that it comes with is pretty bulky. You may look at seeing if there's some alternatives you can do for the stand, cuz the mic is like half the size of the sand.

Ben:

Interesting.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

Ben:

Well, it definitely will be less to carry than the MO two regardless. And headphones I

Gene:

Motos pretty, pretty hefty. Yeah. And, and it's a well you heard the recording. I tried. So the mic we're talking about if anybody's interested is we're looking for a both cheaper and lighter solution than carrying the motu, which is kinda like video cards these days. Really hard to get

Ben:

yeah,

Gene:

they're using Motus to make Bitcoin or something. Yeah, it's got a DSP in it. Yeah, but it's the, the Blue Yeti Junior or something like that. It's basically the small Yeti mic, the current generation, whatever the latest gen smaller size Yeti mic is, and it's 70 bucks or so on Amazon, give or take. It, it's one of the, the reason that I kind of tested it and then told Ben about it is that Yeti was purchased by Logitech, which I didn't realize until recently. And so Logitech has incorporated Yeti software. It's a, it's not even software. It's basically filters that are built in into the chip that does dsp. The conversion of the analog to the digital on the mic. It's a USB mic, so all that happens inside the mic. But the software lets you control things, different parameters, like, a equalizer, but also most importantly a noise gate, which is the biggest thing that was always missing from u sb mics. And the reason that I never recommended'em to people, I always steered them towards a MOTU or other solutions that had noise gates. Because doing a podcast with a mic without a noise gate means you have to run a software noise gate after the fact, which adds processing time and they're not as good because getting rid of things afterwards, you tend to leave some artifacts or it, it becomes more obvious when you were using a software noise gate. So having a hardware noise gate does make it a lot easier. Plus it allows you to do things, not just recordings, but also live streams, which with the Noise Gate, it's much better. And so this, this Yeti mic has that built in. There's other products that they have that also have it built in, and I think they're just calling it Blue something. Blue Tools or blue? Blue sound. Blue

Ben:

Yeti Nano is the one.

Gene:

yeah. Okay. So that's the mic is the Blue Yeti Nano. And then the, the con, the software that controls all the DSB stuff is blue Tools I think, or Blue Audio Tools or something like that.

Ben:

And where we got started on this was you had a headset, a gaming headset you recommended as an And I was like, well, I already carry headset and I see that this is available in,

Gene:

And this is better

Ben:

being used here is somewhere

Gene:

the headset used the headset mic, which is cheap shit generally. So most gaming headsets or any, any kind of headsets except for aviation headsets, that's the one exception. But most headsets really spend like 80% of the money on the headphones and then whatever's left on a microphone. So you tend to have shitty mics, good quality headset, good, good quality audio playback of the audio, right. And I think they, the headsets for aviation tend to be just expensive all the way around. And they have better quality mics and better quality speakers as well. but this particular headset had that same software and which is the main reason I tried it. But since then I've come to find out that this mic exists now and this is a better quality mic from the get-go combined with the same software. Makes it a pretty good portable solution or just a cheap solution. You know, for 70 bucks somebody can get started podcasting.

Ben:

that's the other thing is we've had a few people asking us about mic options and audio options and so on, because the, what we're, what Jean and I are both, on both ends is a pretty expensive way to do it.

Gene:

and I just love telling people, well, here's what you need, but you can't buy it.

Ben:

Yeah. Well, the mo, the MO two that we're both running on the ultra light A V B you know, right now if you can find one somewhere between 600 and a thousand dollars and then the mics that we're using the R E three 20 s are another 300. So, you know, it's not a cheap

Gene:

And that's not, no, it's, it's a thousand dollars deal. But it's, it's actual studio quality gear. Like both of these things would be used in actual studios, even though mine's just sitting on my desk.

Ben:

and quite frankly, the only reason why I have it is I was able to do because of work things basically, you know, get reimbursed for part of it and write part of it

Gene:

Oh, you bastard I didn't know you got it for free. Nice. Very

Ben:

I did not get it for

Gene:

Okay. All

Ben:

The motu, I, because the MOTU wasn't retail, you know, because I had to get it all, that, that was all on me. But the was able to be reimbursed

Gene:

Let off. Yeah. Yeah. The, these mics are, I, I like'em. I think they're good. There's a re 20, which is a much older model of the mic from the same company, which is lecture voice. It's a company that makes these mics, the electro voice. R e 20 is a very traditional mic for talk radio or any kind of news radio in actual radio stations for literally the last 40 years. It is a super common mic. There are a three 20 is a newer model of that same mic, and it's not a replacement. They sell both models, but there are a three 20. It's actually a little cheaper which is great because they're using more modern manufacturing techniques with this model. But also it's it, the sound that it produces has a little bit more highs. The, the reason that are twenties originally were used everywhere is because the are 20 produces the absolute flattest sound from a mic of any. So, which is what you want if you're then going to use sound processing gear, which all these radio stations have to make the host sound good. So you want super flat, super level sound, and then you can tweak it however you want with an equalizer and delays and, and reverb and all that other crap. Ola. So out of the box, the r e 20 sounds like crap because it's meant to sound like crap and totally flat because it's meant to be used with other equipment. There are E three 20 sounds better out of the box because it, it already has some it's not really equalization, but it's just by the build of the device and the components they're using. It sounds a little more live.

Ben:

Yeah, and I mean, to be clear, I, I don't know about you, but on my MO two, all I'm really doing is some basic routing. I have a noise gate set up. And I, I, I don't do any other equalization. I had a high pass filter on for a while, but I've since

Gene:

don't it. You only need to high pass. For people that have really basic voices like Darren O'Neill,

Ben:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

He needs a high pass. The, the other stuff that I have is I do have compression turned on, so if I start getting really loud and and like emotional, then it'll automatically. Still keep that within non distortion area It probably kicks in maybe three, four times in episode when we're recording.

Ben:

Cool.

Gene:

Yeah. But other than that, it's pretty, pretty straightforward. I don't do any queuing on my voice. I, I like the way that my voice sounds coming right out of the the three 20 by itself. anyway, we were gonna end like 15 minutes ago, we got a little, little extra conversation here about microphones.

Ben:

All right, it was good

Gene:

to hearing, hearing the other mic and use on your travels. Looking

Ben:

Well, we might give it a test run here next week. How about that?

Gene:

Very cool. All right. Till next week.