Just Two Good Old Boys

028 Just Two Good Old Boys

May 15, 2023 Gene Naftulyev Season 2023 Episode 28
028 Just Two Good Old Boys
Just Two Good Old Boys
More Info
Just Two Good Old Boys
028 Just Two Good Old Boys
May 15, 2023 Season 2023 Episode 28
Gene Naftulyev

Support the Show.

Read Ben's blog and see product links at namedben.com
Check out Gene's other podcasts -
podcast.sirgene.com and unrelenting.show
If you have comments drop at
Email: gene@sirgene.com Or dude@namedben.com
or on
X.com: @sirgeneTX @dudenamedbenTX
Can't donate? sub to Gene's GAMING youtube channel (even if you never watch!) Sub Here
Weekend Gaming Livestream atlasrandgaming onTwitch
StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
Get EMP protection for your car using our code sirgene

Just Two Good Old Boys
Become a supporter of the show!
Starting at $3/month
Support
Show Notes Transcript

Support the Show.

Read Ben's blog and see product links at namedben.com
Check out Gene's other podcasts -
podcast.sirgene.com and unrelenting.show
If you have comments drop at
Email: gene@sirgene.com Or dude@namedben.com
or on
X.com: @sirgeneTX @dudenamedbenTX
Can't donate? sub to Gene's GAMING youtube channel (even if you never watch!) Sub Here
Weekend Gaming Livestream atlasrandgaming onTwitch
StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
Get EMP protection for your car using our code sirgene

Sir Gene:

Hey Ben, how are you today?

Dude Named Ben:

I'm doing well. I I started smoking a brisket last night and working on that today and I just put some armadillo eggs on the

Sir Gene:

Armadillo eggs.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yes. Armadillo eggs.

Sir Gene:

I've never had one of them.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. So you take a jalapeno. And you mix up some cream cheese. Usually it's seasoned. So I take cream cheese cheddar shredded cheddar cheese. Like in these, I put in some, because I had some made already. I put in some pico and some chopped onion, mixed all that together and seasoned it. Stuff the jalapenos and then coat them in breakfast sausage. And then bacon wrap them

Sir Gene:

wait, you said what? Come on. What?

Dude Named Ben:

breakfast sausage.

Sir Gene:

How do you coat something in sausage?

Dude Named Ben:

Well, you take the, tube of sausage. Well, it's like ground meat, but it's not formed into a patty or anything. You just. Pat it around to form it like an egg, like shape,

Sir Gene:

sort of like scotch

Dude Named Ben:

wrap it in the bacon kind of, but a Texas way,

Sir Gene:

Okay. So where's the armadillo part come in?

Dude Named Ben:

it's just a joke because armadillos don't lay eggs and it's just a Texas thing.

Sir Gene:

I see.

Dude Named Ben:

what they're called,

Sir Gene:

You're just fooling with people.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, so those are on the grill right now. I've got them with both jalapenos and bell peppers for the kids and people who don't like jalapenos and then jalapenos for me.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. To get your kids used to helping you.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, that's,

Sir Gene:

old did they need to be there? What did they tell you as a parent?

Dude Named Ben:

I don't know, but I grew up eating spicy things and I don't know why my kids can't, but that's a whole nother argument, man.

Sir Gene:

Huh. Huh.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway yeah,

Sir Gene:

Well, that's interesting. I've never had armadillo, but apparently they eat them in South America.

Dude Named Ben:

Armadillo is the only other creature to carry leprosy, something I'm probably not going to eat.

Sir Gene:

I'm pretty sure he kills leprosy. He doesn't it?

Dude Named Ben:

I have no idea. Don't want to find out. Don't care. Armadillos are nasty creatures now.

Sir Gene:

Oh, come on people. There's a weird sort of a. How do I describe it? I know the word in the Russian, but I'm trying to think of the right word in English.

Dude Named Ben:

Disgust mechanism.

Sir Gene:

Discuss. That's perfect. Yes. It's a very similar word to discuss the direction that I was thinking of that people have towards all kinds of cute critters like raccoons and snakes and armadillos that I just don't have.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, so,

Sir Gene:

They're prairie dogs. I feed all that shit by hand.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, raccoons, there's the rabies thing, armadillos, there's,

Sir Gene:

Next thing you're gonna tell me you don't like bats.

Dude Named Ben:

I'm not a huge fan of bats, no. I had I had one living in my heater I've got a patio heater, and I had one living up in the little dome part of it, and I found this out by turning it on and it flying and hitting me in the face. Needless to say, it didn't

Sir Gene:

awesome. They literally make Austin livable because they kill all the mosquitoes.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, not a

Sir Gene:

for a city with as many... Lakes and shit around it. Austin has no right to have no mosquitoes.

Dude Named Ben:

True. I mean, here in call

Sir Gene:

I've never been bitten here. Yeah, it's amazing. But there's like, what are they, I think it's a 3 million population of illegal Mexican bats here.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, there's a pretty good. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's a pretty good population there. Speaking of, did you see the border videos?

Sir Gene:

I saw one and I was like, these are not refugees, dude. These are well dressed immigrants.

Dude Named Ben:

well, it's not just that, but just the way the border guards just literally step aside

Sir Gene:

I don't know that there's anything they can do if the president basically says We have no borders anymore. So your job, if you want to keep your job, do nothing.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay, shoot over their heads say, no, you're not going to enter this country. Like

Sir Gene:

that's not what their

Dude Named Ben:

either have a border or you don't.

Sir Gene:

We don't no border.

Dude Named Ben:

And look, I'm all for immigration, but when you look at the mob, tens of thousands of people, it's an invasion

Sir Gene:

it is.

Dude Named Ben:

and that's the problem.

Sir Gene:

it's the reclassifying of illegal aliens as undocumented immigrants is exactly the same sort of Marxist wordplay that we've seen. All throughout the world culture.

Dude Named Ben:

And I think immigration should be much easier than it is. I think we should make it I think we

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I see. I don't

Dude Named Ben:

skilled,

Sir Gene:

don't think it needs to be any easier whatsoever. I think that there should always be. A a hurdle to overcome if you want to come to this country. Well, then again, ultimately, what's going to stop this is the lack of interest in coming to this country.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. What I would say is. I want good. I want immigration and immigration done right. What I would say is when you have armed border guards, they're armed, I presume for a reason facing 10, 000 plus people just pouring through literally shoving you out of the way. I cannot fathom. I guarantee

Sir Gene:

If this

Dude Named Ben:

those guns had to have been unloaded.

Sir Gene:

in a, well, maybe not in California, but in just about any other state, if this happened on the street there would be calls of police brutality. Because the police would not just stand by except for Austin and California.

Dude Named Ben:

All I can say is it was astonishing to just watch and the best way I can put it is the horde of people coming across the border and just literally shoving border agents out of the way that are armed with AR 15 type rifles

Sir Gene:

not imagine Mongolian invasions. When you say the word hoard, it's just, it's automatic for me. So,

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I don't think we're that far off,

Sir Gene:

yeah, I mean, they're not on horseback. That's a difference.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, also, the percentage of men versus women was also very evident.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

This is not families coming across. This is military age men and not just Mexican. They found Chinese, Russian, all sorts of people coming across

Sir Gene:

I mean, it seems like if anything, given the fact that the U S military is 10% year over year, lower every year in a number of applicants at the very least, maybe they ought to mandate, military service for the illegals

Dude Named Ben:

that well, and that is a potential path to citizenship.

Sir Gene:

like alligator. Yeah. And I don't think it's that long. It's like two years.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, no

Sir Gene:

most people don't want to do that. So, Hey, I mentioned this totally off topic unrelenting, but I've been watching house. Did you ever watch that when that was on? I'm just watching it for the first time.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, I used to watch it when I was little.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that is a great show, man.

Dude Named Ben:

Couldn't be made today, but yes.

Sir Gene:

It's a wee bit politically incorrect. The,

Dude Named Ben:

part of what makes it great.

Sir Gene:

well, yeah. The stances that house tends to take. They are generally rational,

Dude Named Ben:

Masculine, yep.

Sir Gene:

shit given to feelings.

Dude Named Ben:

Absolutely. Very Joe Friday of him.

Sir Gene:

Yeah

Dude Named Ben:

on, you never watched Dragnet?

Sir Gene:

I did watch Dragnet, but that was the norm

Dude Named Ben:

the facts, ma'am. Just stick to the facts.

Sir Gene:

Just facts, man. Yeah. Dragnet was a good show. That was, I love their episode about marijuana. They had the evils of marijuana.

Dude Named Ben:

I don't know that I've seen that one.

Sir Gene:

Really?

Dude Named Ben:

it was in syndication when I watched it, obviously.

Sir Gene:

Well, how old do you think I am? Jesus Christ. That show was on in like the early sixties. Huh.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. So you watched it as a kid. I don't know.

Sir Gene:

Exactly.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

The remake was ridiculous.

Dude Named Ben:

I didn't watch it.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that had, the remake was done in the 90s.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. I feel like the remake would be like remaking the blues brothers. Oh, wait, they did that. And

Sir Gene:

Dan Aykroyd was in the remake of Dragnet.

Dude Named Ben:

it makes total sense.

Sir Gene:

Huh. They tried to comedy it up.

Dude Named Ben:

You can't comedy up drag net. What made drag net funny was just the dead pan.

Sir Gene:

It was that pan but it was... Like it wasn't a comedy that was dead pan pretending to be something straight. It was actually a very straight show.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. That just happened to be hilarious.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, because the criminals were well, these days in California, none of them would have been prosecuted for one. And the very no nonsense deadpan and acting style was was great. I think that's timeless.

Dude Named Ben:

so. It's going to be interesting to see, we're looking here in Texas at potentially tens of thousands a day coming into Texas, overwhelming the border communities. If you look at videos of El Paso, where people are sleeping. 5, 6 people deep on the sidewalk which El Paso is not a teeny town. It's like 600, 000. But it is completely overwhelmed when you look at down in the Rio Grande Valley.

Sir Gene:

land back.

Dude Named Ben:

Gene at SirGeneSpeaks.

Sir Gene:

Well, I'm just saying, I mean, once you overwhelm an area and the majority population is not U S citizens, what do you call it?

Dude Named Ben:

scary, ripe for violence. Things are not going to go well. I mean, and, you can talk about Abbott and DeSantis busing X amount and things like that, that happens, but you can only bus so many and,

Sir Gene:

So let me ask you, since you're more of the separation of federal versus not now border control has historically been a federal prerogative.

Dude Named Ben:

it's been a federal duty. It's not a prerogative,

Sir Gene:

Duty duty. Yes. Beavis and butthead are back.

Dude Named Ben:

But it is.

Sir Gene:

is there something preventing the state of Texas from from charging these folks and putting them away?

Dude Named Ben:

Well. So, it depends.

Sir Gene:

federally for crossing the border illegally?

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, so it depends on your view of the constitution. A lot of people today would say the state has no business in immigration. The state has no way of controlling that the state cannot control its own borders. Travel between the states is. Free and so on.

Sir Gene:

Between the state and not states.

Dude Named Ben:

And that is only, so a lot of lawyers would say that's only the purview of the federal government. Now, if you take my stance that the United States of America, capital S, the capital matters because it's a free and sovereign state joining into a federation. The state of Texas has the right to defend its borders. Against foreign adversaries now where we are in a federation of states, and we want to allow the citizens of other states that we're in a federation and cross the border freely. We have no right to stop and. Harass them, i. e. Nevada, California border where they have checkpoints for

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I don't like those. I'm always annoyed when I go

Dude Named Ben:

that is a violation of the constitution. What California is doing their

Sir Gene:

Yeah,

Dude Named Ben:

no ad hominem

Sir Gene:

the Supreme court just said that within 50 miles of the border, they're allowed.

Dude Named Ben:

well, within 120 miles of the border, basically unconstitutional stops have been permitted, which is just insane because that's the vast majority of the

Sir Gene:

120. 50.

Dude Named Ben:

120.

Sir Gene:

Really? That seems far.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Anyway, Okay. So pretty much all of Texas what it comes down to,

Sir Gene:

is more than 120 miles. What?

Dude Named Ben:

it comes down to. Oh, I'm talking population wise. I mean, Dallas is pretty much the only major city outside of that.

Sir Gene:

What are you talking about?

Dude Named Ben:

Austin's within 120 miles of the coast. What do you mean?

Sir Gene:

Hell no. I wish it was. It's no, no way.

Dude Named Ben:

Antonio

Sir Gene:

120 miles.

Dude Named Ben:

straight line. I believe it is

Sir Gene:

To the

Dude Named Ben:

by road straight line. Yeah. Which is a border.

Sir Gene:

As the crow flies. Okay. As the crow flies, you might be right. But. Ah, it's barely if that

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. Anyway. The point is, yes, the state of Texas, which is a free and independent nation of its own right, that is part of a federation, has the right to defend its borders, Since we have the, first and amendments applying to the states, it depends on what you

Sir Gene:

curious, so would Joe Biden send in federal troops to prevent Texas from regulating its border?

Dude Named Ben:

well, so Abbott has called up the National Guard and, DPS and has put quite a bit on the border trying but the fact of the matter is we just, unless you do a full mobilization, the National Guard, we do not have the, I think we should Biden has sent 1500 troops to the border to process paperwork to get the immigrants in faster.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. That's, I don't think that the border can be turned off by the executive. I don't think that without an act of Congress, you're allowed to turn off the border. That seems very suspicious to me.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, here's the power of the executive Congress can make a law and the executive can choose. To enforce it or not through executive order and Congress can try and force to the courts and so on.

Sir Gene:

well, Congress should be able to compel that.

Dude Named Ben:

the only way they can compel that is through impeachment.

Sir Gene:

No, through funding.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, they can only remove funding,

Sir Gene:

Exactly.

Dude Named Ben:

but, if they don't remove funding, or

Sir Gene:

Yeah, like they shouldn't agree to moving the fucking the what do you call it? The maximum amount of money we can borrow.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, the debt ceiling. So,

Sir Gene:

ceiling, which literally they have to do multiple times a year, and if they don't, then the president can't do dick.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, here, hold on. Here's the thing that if Congress wants the president to do something, let's say Congress, since it's Republican controlled, says Biden build the wall and they allocate funds to do it. He can just not spend those funds.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Good. Good luck. Any politician not spending money. Good luck.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, anyway, and there's some question on reallocation and issues there, but yeah, so the debt ceiling is definitely coming up and that's,

Sir Gene:

yeah. It comes

Dude Named Ben:

gonna be interesting.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. They're going to, exactly what's going to happen.

Dude Named Ben:

there will be a continuing resolution, but here's the thing. Our debt has ballooned massively over the last few years. We have to stop the bleeding at some point. You've got Paul Krugman talking about a trillion dollar coin. You've got the Biden administration talking about the 14th amendment, which is just insanity. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

well, we've basically as a country been sitting on 0% interest and bought a house that we can't afford.

Dude Named Ben:

And we have a variable interest rate

Sir Gene:

And we have a variable interest rate. Exactly. Exactly. Exactly. Right.

Dude Named Ben:

which, who knows maybe Trump will get in there

Sir Gene:

And we've

Dude Named Ben:

refinance the debt. Like you talked

Sir Gene:

yeah. And we've decided that the two main enemies of the country are two big banks,

Dude Named Ben:

what two banks?

Sir Gene:

China and Russia.

Dude Named Ben:

No. Who do you think owns the majority of us debt?

Sir Gene:

The, well, the biggest share of non U. S. owned U. S. debt is going to be China.

Dude Named Ben:

Probably Japan actually.

Sir Gene:

No I've definitely looked that up. I'll do that while we keep talking, but Japan has considerably reduced their share of U. S. debt over the last decade.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, that's not true at all. Japan has increased The amount of debt, I mean, especially since Abe and Trump struck up that deal, they've done nothing but double down on it. And it's interesting because only about a quarter of U. S. debt is

Sir Gene:

Holy shit. You're right. Japan has more than China.

Dude Named Ben:

yes, I love it. Sorry

Sir Gene:

oh, really? Oh, Hey Ben. Let's talk about acronyms.

Dude Named Ben:

it

Sir Gene:

What's SCSI stand for?

Dude Named Ben:

wasn't that wasn't

Sir Gene:

No, I know. I'm just asking out of thin air. What's SCSI stand for?

Dude Named Ben:

I don't remember.

Sir Gene:

Small computer serial interface.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Huh. What's RAID stand for?

Dude Named Ben:

Today. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

You mean politically correct fake terminology? Go ahead. Go ahead. Finish the thought.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. You were right about a redundant array of inexpensive discs being the original acronym, but today it's independent discs.

Sir Gene:

called the marketing term because they didn't like the word inexpensive in their marketing

Dude Named Ben:

I mean, why would you want that? But

Sir Gene:

Yeah, you wouldn't exactly,

Dude Named Ben:

anyway,

Sir Gene:

with a dude that was literally there when it happened.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Japan owns more. China is second. United Kingdom is third. Belgium, fourth. Luxembourg, fifth.

Sir Gene:

Now, how much, those are all foreign debts. Well, how do you know what the what percentage of foreign debt versus domestic debt?

Dude Named Ben:

25% of our debt is foreign held right around 7

Sir Gene:

I remember it was under 50 for sure. Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

trillion. The vast majority of debt is U. S. held. In fact, the vast majority of U. S. debt is held by the federal reserve.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. So the federal reserve being a private corporation, not

Dude Named Ben:

far as I'm, as far as I'm concerned, any bonds held by the Fed just nullify them.

Sir Gene:

Yeah but that's the thing is that being a private corporation that literally owns the United States they're probably not going to want to devalue that ownership stake. So does that kind of put them at odds with the interest of the United States?

Dude Named Ben:

it does. I have a solution for the U. S. debt though.

Sir Gene:

Other than canceling it, you mean, okay, let's hear it.

Dude Named Ben:

Abolish BLM and sell all of its holdings. On the real estate market,

Sir Gene:

Do they own the equivalent of the U S debt?

Dude Named Ben:

Easily. I mean, the vast majority of the Western states is owned by BLM. I mean, if you look

Sir Gene:

Oh, but Bureau of land management, you mean not the other BLM.

Dude Named Ben:

Bureau of Land Management,

Sir Gene:

yeah, I thought you meant black lives matter. I'm like, dude, I know they bought some houses, but I didn't think they were that expensive.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, no Bureau of Land

Sir Gene:

land management. Yeah. Give the land back to the original owners.

Dude Named Ben:

No, sell the land off to the highest

Sir Gene:

That's what I meant. Yeah,

Dude Named Ben:

And I think, if you started doing land auctions in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, so on four corner States that alone could probably, I mean, cause we're talking

Sir Gene:

so then China will own more than Japan at that point. China will own more than Japan.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I don't think you allow foreign bidders into the

Sir Gene:

Oh, interesting. Okay. So then Bill Gates,

Dude Named Ben:

again. No. You open it up for, I mean, you could even do land grants. You could do lots of things to encourage economic development, and you could even say foreign owned, but with U. S. citizenship requirements,

Sir Gene:

Gates is American.

Dude Named Ben:

Right. So what I would say is, if you have 1 Chinese who wants to buy 100, 000 acres or whatever, sure, you're going to pay a premium and you have a requirement to become a U. S. citizen in 10 years or you forfeit the property, but we offer you a path to become a citizen.

Sir Gene:

let me ask you this. What do you think of what a lot of other countries, including Mexico do, although they've used up on it lately, which is the idea that foreigners can only lease land, they can't buy land, but they can buy a lease.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, Mexico will allow you to own up to 49% of a property, a Mexican citizen has to be the majority holder.

Sir Gene:

So if you want to own it, but as an American, you can lease for 99 years

Dude Named Ben:

Yes, and you can do stuff like that.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. So what do you think about the U S doing that?

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I personally wouldn't want that,

Sir Gene:

I think that might be a good way to fix California's that crisis. Just,

Dude Named Ben:

well, I mean, you could even do what the UAE does and say, everybody no, one's an immigrant. Everybody is just a visa holder. And if you spend a million and a half dollars here, you can get the best visa we offer. And that's only good for 10 years. I mean, you could do that,

Sir Gene:

extreme. You need to have enough people willing to do that to keep it going.

Dude Named Ben:

I think Dubai certainly does.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. They can get away with it. At least until, fusion becomes doable for real. And then all those cities are going to be a lot less interesting.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I mean, if de globalization actually happens, all those cities are dead.

Sir Gene:

I don't know about that, dude, because I

Dude Named Ben:

If you can't import food. You got a problem.

Sir Gene:

they're always be able to, they import food from Russia, dude. They don't import it from the U S.

Dude Named Ben:

That's not the point. If the, because it is oversee lanes and anyway, to stick with the U. S. debt problem for now. I think, yes, we could come up with some creative strategies. My point is, if we get rid of the BLM land and sell it off over the next 10, 20 years. I think the U. S. debt is gone.

Sir Gene:

let me ask you this if we sell off the BLM land, wouldn't that reduce the holdings of the United States? And therefore we would need to reduce the amount of gold in Fort Knox.

Dude Named Ben:

No. And the U. S. has no business holding land other than for a post office, a fort or an armory, and some minor

Sir Gene:

tend to agree with that, but

Dude Named Ben:

Well, that's what's in the constitution.

Sir Gene:

it holds a lot more land. Thanks Teddy. It holds a lot more land.

Dude Named Ben:

people say, what about national parks? What about public lands? Fuck that. Let it

Sir Gene:

Parks should not be national. There should be zero national parks. They should all be state parks.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, and up until what's the governor? Who's the governor of Texas before Rick Perry? I'm blanking on her name.

Sir Gene:

And Richardson.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. So before her in the nineties, Texas had no national parks. They were state parks. Texas didn't have any federal land. And the argument was made that why is Texas paying for these parks? Why don't we turn it over to the feds and do this?

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's such a stupid argument.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, it was so dumb. So dumb of us.

Sir Gene:

Yes.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway, the federal.

Sir Gene:

fix that, Ben? You should have not let them do it.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, I was a kid. So,

Sir Gene:

I'm just imagining that young Sheldon character from the TV show. There's Ben going to Washington with his briefcase and a little suit.

Dude Named Ben:

Dude, I, the first time I went to Washington DC with my parents, I was like a four or five and I got up and, my dad gave a speech and I told my mom that I wanted to talk. I wanted to talk, so she let me get up there and talk in front of a bunch of Congress critters.

Sir Gene:

Nice. Your dad gave a speech to a bunch of Congress critters

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah.

Sir Gene:

at what event?

Dude Named Ben:

A flying in for freedom on the bunch of events over the years, but this one was specifically about the addition of the Kemp's readily sea turtle to the endangered species list.

Sir Gene:

Oh, right. Cause he was a fisherman. Yeah. Or what do you call that? If you're, if it's not fish, like if it's shrimp,

Dude Named Ben:

He was a shrimp.

Sir Gene:

Bubba Gump.

Dude Named Ben:

which, by the way, it's so funny, my dad he, he's not retired, but he's should be in, is headed in that But he just had a sportsman troll made for his boat so he can go go get some shrimp.

Sir Gene:

Really? That's funny. So you still got a boat out? On the Gulf.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh no. This is just a fishing, just like a bass boat sort of

Sir Gene:

Oh, okay. Okay. Got it. Got it. But you can go on in the Gulf with it.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, so the funny thing is that with a sportsman trawl, it's an, it's actually pretty crazy. So if the season is open in the Gulf, which I think it closes tomorrow, but you can go with a sportsman's trawl, get a hundred pounds of shrimp a day.

Sir Gene:

that's a lot of shrimp. That's like several months worth of shrimp for me.

Dude Named Ben:

Well,

Sir Gene:

Well, you're probably used to eating a lot more shrimp than that.

Dude Named Ben:

No I'm the only one who really likes shrimp in the house, unfortunately, or fish for that matter, which is just so annoying.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I occasionally I'll have a hankering for some shrimp and used to make them on the grill all the time.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah.

Sir Gene:

and I just, find that while they tend to get smaller that way, because they dry out. The flavor is really good.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I mean, don't overcook your shrimp and know what you're doing. And yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well, I just did it very simply for many years where I just sprinkled the shrimp in a Cajun spices on both sides and then put them on the top rack on the grill and

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. So you're totally doing it wrong.

Sir Gene:

Okay. Well, Hey, I probably, but it was tasty.

Dude Named Ben:

All right. So if I'm going to grill shrimp, so first of all, I'll take a stick of butter now, melt it in the pan. I'll take garlic powder, some Tony saturies and a couple other things. And I'll basically put it till it hurts. Like you'll think you're way over seasoning, but you're not because most of it's going to just fall off. And then I'll let it cool till it gets to about a little runnier than a paste like consistency. I'll slather that all over the peeled shrimp. Okay in depending on the size of the shrimp, I'll either put them on skewers or whatever. Then I'll get my grill about as hot as I can freaking get it and I will sear the shrimp both sides. A few minutes and then move them off the heat, sear, move them off the heat, sear, move them off the heat, but really shrimp, no matter how big they are, 10 minutes is a long time to cook shrimp.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

They cook very

Sir Gene:

agree with that. Yep.

Dude Named Ben:

If you're cooking them, if you're just putting them on the grill with something else or whatever and letting, you can easily overcook

Sir Gene:

No, I wouldn't put them with something else. I would just not use the bottom level.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, but you, so I guess I want that little bit of char and the butter to burn off and leave that flavor.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I mean, there was just a hint of charring on the tail. There wasn't much on the actual flesh, but the the fact that they're, they lose, shrimp are like mostly water. So the.

Dude Named Ben:

meat is yeah.

Sir Gene:

When they start shrinking a little bit the outer flesh gets more like skin and it holds on to the flavor. That's what I like about that method is that the a lot of the spices that you put on them actually adhere to them. They don't fall off.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Well, anyway I, but the butter sauce, it just makes it an,

Sir Gene:

Actually, a hundred pounds would last me a year. I just thought about it. I was like a hundred pounds, dude. That's that is totally a year's worth of shrimp.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, I could go through that in a weekend with enough people do a big shrimp boil in a party.

Sir Gene:

enough people, sure. But how long would it take you to eat that much shrimp?

Dude Named Ben:

Oh,

Sir Gene:

10 pounds a month is definitely the most I would ever eat.

Dude Named Ben:

I, I mean, so first of all, this is head on, and this is what, so you're gonna get to think when you head shrimp, depending on the size and everything else, you're losing about a third.

Sir Gene:

Okay. Okay. So it's more like 60 pounds. Okay.

Dude Named Ben:

Which by the way, if you're doing a shrimp boil, leave your heads on, do not peel the shrimp,

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I

Dude Named Ben:

let, because it's flavor.

Sir Gene:

right, right, right. Have you eaten shrimp without peeling them?

Dude Named Ben:

No, God, no. Of course you peel them.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, so sometimes I like to eat them fully unpeeled.

Dude Named Ben:

Why?

Sir Gene:

Well, chitin is good for you. And I don't know. I just, I don't mind the flavor. I actually like the flavor of the chitin mixed in there.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, no thanks. And that's got to hurt all the way out.

Sir Gene:

It is totally not going to hurt,

Dude Named Ben:

Huh. Let's see what happens when you eat the horn.

Sir Gene:

you, you can eat that. Well, I mean, I don't know, maybe my stomach gas is a little stronger than yours.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, no, thank you. And for those who don't know, shrimp have horns on their head and their tail.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, but you chew them up. I mean, I didn't say swallow the damn thing without chewing it.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay, well, you can do that all you want. I'm gonna peel my shrimp.

Sir Gene:

Do you peel your soft shell crab too?

Dude Named Ben:

I don't eat a lot of soft shell crab, but what

Sir Gene:

you eat crickets? Do you peel those?

Dude Named Ben:

I don't eat crickets.

Sir Gene:

What the hell's the matter with you?

Dude Named Ben:

Mmm.

Sir Gene:

a great source of chitin, you need chitin, everybody needs more

Dude Named Ben:

as omnivorous as I am not insectivorous.

Sir Gene:

an insectivore?

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

I've tried all that stuff and when I had pet lizards, that's the mainstay of what they ate is crickets. So I bred crickets at home. Yeah, for them, because it was way cheaper than buying them. And amazingly, crickets really like sex. So they're easier to breed than rats.

Dude Named Ben:

I don't know if they like sex or they just

Sir Gene:

well, they reproduce in any kind of environment. They don't really, they don't really have a special specialty there that they need.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, that's not necessarily indicative.

Sir Gene:

But I've tried like, mealworms and crickets and all the different kind of grubs and animals that the... My pets would eat

Dude Named Ben:

Good for you. That's not me.

Sir Gene:

well, it just, sometimes you just can't help. They just fall in your mouth,

Dude Named Ben:

I think I can help that. But anyway, so, anyway, the debt ceiling is definitely coming up. I think we're going to see a continuing

Sir Gene:

I'm pumped.

Dude Named Ben:

and it's, it's just not going to

Sir Gene:

The only time I've ever seen

Dude Named Ben:

going to see a cut in

Sir Gene:

Yeah. The only time I've ever seen anybody push back against this was back in the nineties with new getting rich where they quote unquote, shut down the government. Not for long enough, if you ask me, but at least they did it. And it was a fairly unified Republican group.

Dude Named Ben:

There have been government shutdowns, under the Obama administration and everything else. There have been times when

Sir Gene:

anyone been as long as the Gingrich ones.

Dude Named Ben:

now. And, a lot of people would say that Gingrich paid for that by losing the speakership. But

Sir Gene:

That's probably true as well. What I remember from that time was that it was a realization and not an unexpected one for me, but maybe for some people that much like Twitter, after Elon Musk fired 90% of the employees. It keeps going just fine. The functions of government keep going just fine when the government is shut down and the makes me wonder, why do we need the rest of the people? That are on

Dude Named Ben:

I. 100%. I think we should

Sir Gene:

because the ones that are deemed essential are the only ones that you actually need the government to do

Dude Named Ben:

I don't even think we need a lot of the quote unquote essential ones.

Sir Gene:

or you still need people working border security because otherwise, you can't come back to the U S even

Dude Named Ben:

Sure. But we can get rid of, the IRS.

Sir Gene:

Yes. Yes. I'm trying to remember if they were essential or not. I'm sure they must have been.

Dude Named Ben:

I'm sure.

Sir Gene:

And of course I'm sure ATF was considered essential,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. I really like what some people had to say about the IRS and the fifth amendment, I like that thought

Sir Gene:

On what?

Dude Named Ben:

that it's a vile, the filing your income taxes is a violation of the fifth amendment. Tend to agree?

Sir Gene:

But isn't that voluntary?

Dude Named Ben:

No, not, I mean, when you have to do something and it's at the point of a gun, and if you don't, you go and don't file

Sir Gene:

you wouldn't consider a confession to be voluntary. If it's at the point of a gun,

Dude Named Ben:

Now,

Sir Gene:

we'll go figure.

Dude Named Ben:

I don't know why you would, but okay. So, speaking of Twitter Musk has appointed a new CEO.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. A surprise for a lot of us.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah for those of us who aren't big fans of the World Economic Forum, it's a little disappointing.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I'm not sure that's came out of left field for me. I didn't hear any rumors of her being considered even.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, there were some articles talking about her and everything else, and I don't know, it's, it seems anathema because, ostensibly, Elon's been fairly vocal about not going the way of the World Economic Forum. I don't know if it's just that she served in the Trump administration and he's looking at that and not. Prioritizing or thinking things through.

Sir Gene:

crappy people serving in his

Dude Named Ben:

John Bolton. So anyway there's a lot

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I think that I'm not going to pull the trigger immediately here, but as soon as she does something stupid, I'm canceling Twitter blue,

Dude Named Ben:

yeah,

Sir Gene:

honestly, it's there's no real reason for it. I mean, I just only have it. Just to piss off the liberals on there

Dude Named Ben:

I don't pay for Twitter in any way, shape or form. In fact when Twitter went really woke After 2016 I just, I still have a Twitter account, but I don't use it. I'm just not on there. Occasionally, if I'm doing some research or something, it's useful, but other than that, it's not so.

Sir Gene:

you don't need an account for research.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah, you do. Yeah, you do. Yep. Twitter's locked down a lot of things. So if there's a post that's considered, not safe for work or whatever, not necessarily even porn, but, just various

Sir Gene:

the hell kind

Dude Named Ben:

you have to sign in.

Sir Gene:

What kind of posts are you looking at?

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, I mean, dude, any, a lot of right wing things and so on get tagged that way that you have to sign in to be able to see it

Sir Gene:

I guess I don't have any right wingers I'm following.

Dude Named Ben:

or that or you're signed in all the time.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, well, fair enough. I just, yeah, I could

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah go there and incognito and then look.

Sir Gene:

Well, there is that little plugin you can get for Brave or whatever. That's. Let's you do incognito Twitter.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Brave is just not stable enough for me.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I switched to edge mostly, but I still have brave that I use

Dude Named Ben:

Sorry. I just threw up in my mouth a little bit when you said that.

Sir Gene:

whatever,

Dude Named Ben:

I switched to IE.

Sir Gene:

A little bit of a difference between edge and IE,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

but it's been really solid. I think I'm running about 180 tabs in there right now,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. So let's see.

Sir Gene:

brave has trouble with

Dude Named Ben:

So in, in how many tabs do you think I have in Firefox across three windows right

Sir Gene:

you're like a hoarder. So probably over a hundred.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, so granted, this is some things that need to get cleared out and this is just probably a year's worth of,

Sir Gene:

so you're using your tabs as an inbox.

Dude Named Ben:

various yeah. So, and I didn't even realize it had gotten this bad, but I'm like, when did this happen? Yeah, I have over a thousand tabs open right

Sir Gene:

No,

Dude Named Ben:

Yep,

Sir Gene:

a thousand, my friend, you have a problem

Dude Named Ben:

1326.

Sir Gene:

and it's not a technical problem. It's not a technical problem,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, I think I need to close these out and just, go from there. I didn't even realize it had been

Sir Gene:

this is what I like that, that I think all of them are moving to this. But the first one I saw do this was edge was have an option to not keep tabs that have not been looked at for longer than a day in memory. Okay. So it shows as a tab, but it's not actually loaded in.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, Firefox is the same thing.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, because otherwise with a thousand tabs, Oh my God, that would be crazy.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I mean, it's still, Firefox is by far the biggest memory use I have.

Sir Gene:

I'm sure it is.

Dude Named Ben:

Memory. Yeah, it's over three gigs right now.

Sir Gene:

That doesn't sound like that much

Dude Named Ben:

Well, anyway, so this CEO choice is a little odd and we'll see what happens. I.

Sir Gene:

right now,

Dude Named Ben:

I think, Tim talking about, should he cancel his company's Twitter blue and things like that? I don't. I think he should wait and see what happens.

Sir Gene:

what I'm doing. I'm going to wait and see.

Dude Named Ben:

because if you just. Don't cut your nose off despite your face. Number one. And then number two, if you want Elon to do the right thing, you have to incentivize him to do the right thing. If you just cut it off and say, well, you hired someone

Sir Gene:

Well, wait a minute. Wait a minute. Tim is talking about doing what people that followed him did that. He got really pissed off about people doing.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

Oh, the irony.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah. Everything comes back around anyway. So I think you. I think where Tim ended up landing is right. And that you say, Hey, I'm on the, you're on thin ice. I don't like the person you hired. And, if they go that bad direction, then I'm going to boycott you and, cause you pain. Then that's legitimate.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

Before, before she's even taken her first day, I don't think you just. Drop it.

Sir Gene:

I did tweet Elon, though, with a bad choice, why you try and duplicate what Trump did in his administration.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. And that, I think that's very speech is the right answer.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Yep. We'll see. I mean, could be one of those people that just excels at whatever she's doing. So when she's working for WEF, she's really good at that. Was she the president or vice president? She had some high title.

Dude Named Ben:

She was of a part of a group. I don't remember the

Sir Gene:

But she was like the head of a group. I think

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

It was significant. It wasn't just member of, it was like, leadership position in.

Dude Named Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. So I don't know, I guess there's a certain draw that people feel to being a part of a James Bond villains organization, which. I mean, to be fair, Musk is definitely one of those.

Dude Named Ben:

I'll sell

Sir Gene:

Oh, dude, he's totally a James Bond villain.

Dude Named Ben:

in what way.

Sir Gene:

Do you ever watch Moonraker? He is Drax.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

He's from South Africa and he's the guy that is chummy with the US government and selling them space shuttles, but secretly building his own fleet to get the ideal people off the planet and then drop a biological weapon on the earth. To cleanse it before repopulating it with his chosen people. It's a great movie. I don't know. It probably doesn't hold up in the in all the space fighting

Dude Named Ben:

was

Sir Gene:

as Roger Moore

Dude Named Ben:

it? That's why I've never seen it.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, but

Dude Named Ben:

One of the worst

Sir Gene:

a great locations. It had jaws, which was one of my favorite characters.

Dude Named Ben:

Who's your favorite bond?

Sir Gene:

Well it's I honestly, I don't mind Roger Moore. I mean, Sean Connery is the bond obviously, but, but I grew up watching Roger Moore in all the new movies when I was young. And so I don't mind him other than the last two like Octopussy started going downhill. And then the what was the last one? The I can't, I've blocked it out because it was so crappy, but it was the one that was in the United States. And that was, that should never have been made. I really had high hopes for Pierce Brosnan, who was supposed to be bond immediately after Roger Moore. But his contract for a show he was doing on TV called moonlighting. No, it wasn't moonlighting. That was Bruce Willis. It was called Remington steel where he played a have you seen the show ever?

Dude Named Ben:

No.

Sir Gene:

It's actually a pretty, pretty funny show. Pretty good show. So the premise for Remington steel is you had this female detective who was really good men are sexist. And so she really couldn't compete because no one took her seriously as a female detective. And so she came up with this this idea to hire a figurehead and Remington steel was the fake name. Of her agency, and then she hired this British guy to be the symbolic Remington steel and that way he's got a great accent. He looks really sharp, Pierce Brosnan looked like, especially when he was younger. And that way she could get the high profile cases. So that was the premise and I think it worked pretty well because he had a little bit of the house thing going on, meaning he was arrogant and somewhat over the top and really liked to play it up. But that was a fun show, but anyway, they wouldn't let them out of their contract. To go do bond, which they're idiots because they would have, that would have made people come back and watch the reruns of Remington steel a lot more because he was now bond. And as a result, we had Timothy Dalton come in. Who's like one of the worst bonds. Although I think the worst bond was the last one,

Dude Named Ben:

Who's that?

Sir Gene:

a little short blonde dude.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah. The blonde bond. Yeah. Well, what are you going to do?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And I guess the next one is going to be a lesbian. So they've said, because. Broccoli's daughter or niece or some chick that's currently running the operation. The ones to get all the sexism out of Bond.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I without getting into too much, we got into it the other day about some of these remakes. I flat out said that, my kids weren't allowed to watch the new live action Little Mermaid.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, fuck that shit. All Disney as far as I'm concerned.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I don't have as big of a problem with it as you do, I think it's racist as hell that they take a, I don't have a problem that they made Ariel black, but what they should have done is made a new Little Mermaid with a totally different character, huh?

Sir Gene:

Yeah, except that Ariel isn't black.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, she is in this, but the problem I have with the live

Sir Gene:

isn't Little Mermaid.

Dude Named Ben:

hold on, is they made her have red hair.

Sir Gene:

You're right. Right.

Dude Named Ben:

So

Sir Gene:

Just be thankful she doesn't have blue hair.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, anyway, my

Sir Gene:

the way, would be a lot

Dude Named Ben:

her have her natural hair.

Sir Gene:

Have you seen what blonde hair turns into when you're in the saltwater lot?

Dude Named Ben:

yeah I have blonde hair that I was in saltwater a lot as a kid.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I'm not talking about

Dude Named Ben:

Nor am I.

Sir Gene:

pubes, man.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway, It just comes down to first of all, they've also changed the story So she's not wanting to leave the ocean because of Eric, she's wanting to leave the ocean because of herself it's about her and

Sir Gene:

So they made her a narcissist.

Dude Named Ben:

Yep 100%. Well, they made her a modern woman is what they did.

Sir Gene:

Right,

Dude Named Ben:

Sadly.

Sir Gene:

But I'm pumped.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that's bad. I it's all bullshit, man. Just have the kids read the originals or listen to the audio books of the original source material.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, the original source material for the little mermaid is pretty morbid.

Sir Gene:

It's pretty morbid.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah,

Sir Gene:

I read it as a kid. I don't remember it being morbid. I remember it

Dude Named Ben:

you did not read the original source material for the little mermaid.

Sir Gene:

I totally did.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. Okay. Well, she dies and is, a haunting angel and so on. So, yeah.

Sir Gene:

What? What? How's it going? The American version. I

Dude Named Ben:

What do you mean? I just told you,

Sir Gene:

didn't, I've never seen the little mermaid. Okay. The movie.

Dude Named Ben:

you cut what?

Sir Gene:

Never seen it.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, in the cartoon little mermaid version, the original version from, I guess, the 70s or 80s She follows and then falls in love with this prince, Eric and wants to, she saves his life from a shipwreck wants to, try and be human ends up going to the sea, which Ursula and trades her voice and her life potentially for legs. And she has three days where she cannot speak to make him fall in love with her and kiss her before sunset and so on.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. So obviously.

Sir Gene:

very similar to the story by Hans Christian Andersen.

Dude Named Ben:

I I don't think so, but anyway, so she, through Ursula's manipulations she does not get to make him fall in love with her. So Ursula is taking Ariel as her prize. The King Triton, the, her dad or whatever comes in and tries to take his place. There's a whole battle scene in the end.

Sir Gene:

King

Dude Named Ben:

ends up dead. King Triton, yes. King of the Mermen. Why?

Sir Gene:

Well, because it, I would have thought that it was Neptune.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, Neptune's, the God of the Sea King Triton is the king of the Merman in the little Mer. Anyway, it's a whole whatever. It's, the point is the entire point here isn't the story of the Little Mermaid. The point is that they changed it and made it something awoke.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, they definitely did. But I think they, I just. I really don't like Disney, man. I think they're

Dude Named Ben:

You what?

Sir Gene:

I don't like Disney. I think they're evil.

Dude Named Ben:

I think they're able to,

Sir Gene:

I think they prey on children and they prey on adults by leveraging their children. And. I've not had to make this choice having not having a kid, but I would absolutely not let my kids watch a goddamn thing made by Disney ever.

Dude Named Ben:

Well there are some things that are okay and good in my. Cause Disney now owns Pixar. So like a lot of before Buzz Lightyear like the the Toy Story movies were pretty good.

Sir Gene:

Weren't PC from the get go, dude. I

Dude Named Ben:

how

Sir Gene:

think they've gotten worse, but I always thought they were very

Dude Named Ben:

how has Toy Story PC.

Sir Gene:

Toy Story, let me think. I remember when I watched it, it seemed like it was PC to me. It's been many years.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. Well, anyway it's a buddy cop movie as far as I'm concerned. So I have less problem with that. The, I don't really like a lot of the princess movies because. I think they, especially for little girls set a really shitty idea up in their head

Sir Gene:

You don't have to work. You could just be beautiful and be a princess. Yeah. Which is total bullshit.

Dude Named Ben:

well, and for a small minority of women. Sure. Not every, and this is why I get onto my wife. Anytime she calls my daughter, a princess, it's like, no, please do not call her that

Sir Gene:

Yeah. That's just setting her up for a regret later in life. Yeah I'm just skimming through. Apparently there's some gay themes in little mermaid that I never picked up on.

Dude Named Ben:

such as.

Sir Gene:

I don't know. It's this, people are talking about it that

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I know on one of the VHS boxes, there was the Mer City, one of them was a phallic shape on one of the original

Sir Gene:

talking about how the. The story was written by Hans Christian Andersen as a love ode to Edward Cullen. And the idea being that love was forbidden.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, whatever.

Sir Gene:

yeah, exactly. Although reading this letter, it does sound kind of gay ish. Was Hans Christian Andersen gay? Do we know that? I

Dude Named Ben:

I have no idea. We're off the

Sir Gene:

Anyway,

Dude Named Ben:

rails.

Sir Gene:

whole point is people ought to be the ones that are educating their kids, not like.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, and

Sir Gene:

it to Disney.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, and while we're on the Disney thing, Disney has had a long habit of putting weird subliminal stuff. In their movies for a long time, since the eighties whether it was the phallic symbol on the VHS cover of little mermaid or the word sex appearing in the smoke in Lion King. I mean, the, you can go, there's lots and lots of things here. Little mermaid Lion King and Aladdin are some of the most egregious, but there's in In The Great Mouse Detectives, there was even a single frame of adult material put in at one point. Yes, that has never been explained.

Sir Gene:

Interesting. Yeah. I just, that, then I don't like all the Nazi past they have.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, well. Okay, well, now they're very much into the trans malism,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Which makes total sense. It's

Dude Named Ben:

which I was very pleased to see Luke running that poll on YouTube.

Sir Gene:

Oh, well, yeah. I'd tell people what the poll was.

Dude Named Ben:

So, Luke Rinkowski however you pronounce his last name was running a poll on, are we going through a Maoist style cultural revolution? And of course, based off of his viewership, over 90% was yes.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And as much as I love the 90% response rate to that, it does say more about Luke's listeners then. About whether we actually are,

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, well, I think we 100% actually are. But

Sir Gene:

but even if we're not, I think his listeners who you and I are part of that group would totally put yes to answer to that poll.

Dude Named Ben:

I like Luke on other people's podcasts. I can't listen to his.

Sir Gene:

He Luke solo is not compelling. Luke talking with somebody is great because he typically represents the point that I have. So I'm very selfish in my like of Luke. But yeah, he's his solo show is just a, not as good version of a rundown of news topics that a lot of other people in the conservative side do.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

And my pet peeve with him. And I told him this in person is that he uses of course, way too often.

Dude Named Ben:

Of course he does.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. It's at least once per paragraph.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

It's like some people say, right, his right

Dude Named Ben:

Huh.

Sir Gene:

Of course, we know that Twitter will fail now that Elon Musk has hired somebody from the WF,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. I like how you think you've shamed me out of saying nuclear.

Sir Gene:

I did. You've been very consciously saying nuclear for the last year.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. I caught that on the, yeah, your

Sir Gene:

glad you listened to my other podcasts, but I, no, I think it's true. I don't see how you could deny that. Who else around you has been making fun of you saying nuclear

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, well, anyway, so what else is in the news? Gene

Sir Gene:

yeah. Good question. What's in the news. I've been somewhat avoiding news just because I got sucked into watching house and I'm watching like five episodes a day,

Dude Named Ben:

you're watching five episodes of house a day.

Sir Gene:

There's 11 seasons, right?

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, but it gets so repetitive. How can you, I mean, it's so the problem I have with shows like house is it's just form of formula, right?

Sir Gene:

Yes.

Dude Named Ben:

It's very formulaic. Okay, mysterious illness. Oh, no. What are we going to do? Who could ever solve this? What are we going to? We're going to try 50 different things that aren't going to work. And then we're going to,

Sir Gene:

I do like the fact that virtually every episode has them making mistakes.

Dude Named Ben:

well, I mean, they have to though.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, but most American shows by, I don't know, some Hollywood standard writing deal, they would never do that. Like to show your main character making a mistake every single episode. What other show does that

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, but again, it's part of their formula.

Sir Gene:

it is? I agree. I agree, but it's a refreshing formula, but it's, yeah, maybe it'll get boring. I don't know. Maybe by season three or four, I'll start. So I'm in season two right now.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, again, it's 1 of those things that it's not boring because it's a well written show that said. There's only I just couldn't watch that much of it, I guess,

Sir Gene:

Well, if I only watch one episode a day, it would take me till the end of the year to finish it because

Dude Named Ben:

why is that a bad thing? I

Sir Gene:

I have plenty of other things to watch as well.

Dude Named Ben:

mean, you can watch more than one thing at once.

Sir Gene:

Good. I'm not sure I would want to.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

I just I don't know if you're been catching any of the OCD here, but it definitely

Dude Named Ben:

You OCD? No.

Sir Gene:

just a wee bit that was my generation's psych disorder of choice that most people seem to have

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

rather than anxiety and lack of concentration, all the crap the modern kids have these days, we tended to like, Get into toy miniatures and would sit there and paint them for days on end crap like that. Do you ever have a hobby like that? Did you ever get into any kind of non

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah I did models, a lot of models

Sir Gene:

Like, which genre of models

Dude Named Ben:

Airplanes, sci fi cars.

Sir Gene:

I did at some airplanes. Not a fan of the smell of the glue. I know a lot of people really like that smell.

Dude Named Ben:

know. I can't stand it either, but it was one of those things to get past.

Sir Gene:

Yeah that to me made it less interesting, but I know some of my friends in school were like, that's the best part, like, you gotta be nuts.

Dude Named Ben:

no, I was never a glue sniffer. But yeah. I did I did quite a few models, and one of my favorites was actually Babylon 5 model of one of the Starfuries. That one was a lot of fun. In fact, I still have it floating around

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I'm not even sure I should admit this, but. Here goes, I've never seen Babylon five.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh my, what is wrong with you, dude? Like, seriously, stop watching Hells, and watch Babylon 5.

Sir Gene:

Okay. It came out during a point in time when I didn't own a TV. And so I wasn't watching any shows. I think I've talked about this another show. So I basically, I grew up with a TV, like most people. But as soon as I moved out of my parents house I did not get a television because it's a big waste of time. And I didn't have a television for about a decade until I got married. At which point I once again, got a TV because my wife was Russian and it's a good way to learn English is watching television. And so then I watched TV and decade later when we got divorced. I gave her all the TVs that we had as part of that divorce, because I didn't really want them. And then I haven't had a TV, sort of, since then. And what I mean by sort of is, I still don't technically have a TV, but I have, like 45 inch computer monitors, and I have several projectors in the house with 100 plus inch screens. They're not connected to any antennas. They're not connected to cable. I haven't had a cable bill in over a decade, but since everything is mostly online, I, that's why I have to use the word sort of, because obviously I can watch stuff that's on Amazon or with your assistance on paramount plus.

Dude Named Ben:

well, 1 of the things I'd say on Babylon 5, which is on HBO Max, by the way what's really cool is that it is a 5 season story arc that is more or less planned out from the beginning. The major points planned out

Sir Gene:

So you're saying they finished it at the right time.

Dude Named Ben:

Ye they went a few. The sun there, there are a handful of episodes that went past the primary story arc that they were forced to do because they wanted to spin, spinoff, do spinoffs, which they did, which the spinoffs all suck. That, that said they tried to do, they achieved the full story arc completion. And, there are a hand, there's less than 10 extraneous episodes, I'll put it that way. And those were primarily insisted upon for spinoffs.

Sir Gene:

I feel like I should watch it at some point because. It definitely has survived the test of time for memeing

Dude Named Ben:

I, well, especially in the time that we're in right now, because it's a revolution story. It's lots of things. And the reason why I like the Starfury fighter concept, if you'll Google it and bring it up. If you look at a Starfury, which I just found the model, it's in my desk drawer here. So, it's essentially, it looks like an X Wing in that it's got X shaped wings, but they're not really wings, they're just support struts. And it has, these engines that are set up in a way, if you were in a Zero G fighter, you would want

Sir Gene:

a, a hammer or cross shape looks like.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, but, I mean, literally, it is set up, and the way they... The way they show it flying in in Babylon 5 is very much in the realm of physics and inertia

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah. You're right. They have thrusters going in every direction.

Dude Named Ben:

it's actually like, okay, yes, this is what a Zero G fighter would look like.

Sir Gene:

And the big engines are in the back.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes,

Sir Gene:

Oh my God. They have radiators. Holy shit. This is well done. Yeah. Almost nobody uses radiators. It's one of the big, failures of sci fi films is the failure to put radiators on your space ships.

Dude Named Ben:

because heat is trapped.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly. That amazingly vacuum. It's very good insulator.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes,

Sir Gene:

We literally use it here to insulate things.

Dude Named Ben:

exactly. So anyway, yeah, but enough battle on 5 talk. You should watch it,

Sir Gene:

No, I will. This is a, this looks cool. Now you've seen the expanse. So how's it compared to the expanse?

Dude Named Ben:

from a physics standpoint, pretty close.

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Dude Named Ben:

The way they have the Russian auntie accelerating and moving and so on. The way they would have. Battles and battle on five and so on is very close. They, the earth ships, we don't have artificial gravity technology, so they literally have to spin sections to generate centripetal force to emulate gravity and so on. Some of the aliens have artificial gravity, but we don't.

Sir Gene:

And this is one of the things that I love that they did in

Dude Named Ben:

And just to be clear. It's not a Federation, it's not a Star Trek thing where all aliens are living together in harmony and everything else. No, all the alien species are distinct separate countries, if you will. And,

Sir Gene:

Well, maybe I'll take a break in house and watch that for a while because. I need to,

Dude Named Ben:

that are subjugated and everything else.

Sir Gene:

yeah, I need to cleanse the sci fi palette a little bit from that book I was telling you about last week or that series of books about that are sci fi that I was listening to, which are like their collection of the right elements that are just thrown together. Not very well. If that's a good way of phrasing it, they've got the stuff that sci fi should have, but somehow they managed to not have a story.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. So, so in, in Babylon 5, which I obviously am a pretty big fan.

Sir Gene:

Sounds like a,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, so there are characters with names that if you understand Latin have some meaning behind them. There's a lot of political intrigue that goes on. There's a lot of subversive things that are happening and,

Sir Gene:

and what is Babylon five? They're spaceshipers.

Dude Named Ben:

It's a space station.

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Dude Named Ben:

It

Sir Gene:

that was what turned me off of it initially is

Dude Named Ben:

Oh no.

Sir Gene:

I didn't like the idea of it's what was the Star Trek with a space

Dude Named Ben:

DS nine.

Sir Gene:

yeah, that sucked.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Well, that's because it's entirely different concepts. So, in the star Trek universe, you've got the Federation where multiple species are living in data in battle on five they're coming off of the earth Mambari war where earth almost was destroyed and lost. And. It's a United Nations and space sort of thing where Babylon 5 is trying to be peaceful. It's a neutral space and so on. But yeah, there's no shortage of. Action and intrigue and you have telepaths in this universe. It's very interesting how telepaths on earth are treated and their rights removed and so on.

Sir Gene:

Well, that reminds me then, have you watched the new Dune,

Dude Named Ben:

I have. Yeah,

Sir Gene:

what'd you think?

Dude Named Ben:

I'm interested to see the next the next 1.

Sir Gene:

Yeah,

Dude Named Ben:

it was fairly well done. The book the book, it's better than the 1980s movie. Although I still like the

Sir Gene:

That movie is iconic though. I mean, for the time it was, they were doing shit. Nobody else was. But I think that is one of those books that is going to be really hard to turn into a movie for anybody.

Dude Named Ben:

especially if you really go through the entire original series. Yes. Which I'm a huge, the original dune is good. The

Sir Gene:

one I've read.

Dude Named Ben:

The next book, but God emperor is fantastic. I am a huge fan of that. So now back to a little bit more serious topic. I got to share this with you because I call bullshit. So, so can you see my screen?

Sir Gene:

Yes. All right. Listener. Can you see his screen?

Dude Named Ben:

yeah. Okay. So

Sir Gene:

What are we looking at here?

Dude Named Ben:

What the hell? So we're looking at the St. Louis fed M one money stock, which is basically amount of money in circulation, which 2020. Right? COVID this massive inflation.

Sir Gene:

line.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes, literally a vertical line. Yes. And not a small vertical line. We go from, and this is an,

Sir Gene:

It's tripled. Whatever it was at. Is it more? Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

how easily, but here as of. July 2022 ish, they show the money's going back down,

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

which

Sir Gene:

the contraction of the economy or what

Dude Named Ben:

so okay. So here, this vertical line, what happened here was they essentially changed the meaning of savings accounts and the way savings accounts could be spent from. So that's 2020. Yes. So there's that, but then you have, still a huge hockey stick right here going up through

Sir Gene:

I mean, I hate to say it. It's they're literally drawing a hockey stick right now is what it looks like.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes, but now it's showing a decline and I want to know what this decline is because it's not, it doesn't track with interest rates. So you can't say that it something's up here anyway, something I was going through my tabs, closing them and I hadn't looked at this in a

Sir Gene:

I've not seen this little bit on the end, so I have no comment on that, but it is interesting. I'd love to. more by the folks that studied this, I was originally an econ major in school.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, so that's what's wrong with you.

Sir Gene:

Yes, but that's how I get to meet Milton Friedman

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

probably wouldn't have happened otherwise.

Dude Named Ben:

so, economics, the feds continuing to raise interest rates by a quarter point we are at a place where it truly is going to be interesting if we do see a dollarization, especially given that graph I was just showing you the only thing I can say to that is. I don't think there's a currency that can replace the dollar today. Now, if bricks gets their shit together and actually does come up with a commodity backed, if they can ever agree on the basket of goods to back it, which is the current sticking point, right? It'll be pretty interesting. Did you see what Chile is doing?

Sir Gene:

No, it's really doing

Dude Named Ben:

They are nationalizing their lithium mines.

Sir Gene:

really

Dude Named Ben:

Yes,

Sir Gene:

Wait a minute. The American companies aren't going to like that

Dude Named Ben:

correct. They are nationalizing their Chile mine their Chile mines. Chile is nationalizing their lithium mines. And it looks like they are going to ban the export of lithium ore.

Sir Gene:

What do you mean? What are they? So they want to make the batteries.

Dude Named Ben:

They want they're going down the 1st steps to at least have the refining process as well as the mining process, which, for those who don't know, Chile is the 2nd largest repository of lithium outside of Australia's number 1,

Sir Gene:

I think that means that Chile is must have a really evil back dictator that we're going to need to overthrow. It sounds like.

Dude Named Ben:

We'll see

Sir Gene:

that's the policy of the United States historically

Dude Named Ben:

part of that in sourcing and deglobalization man. So they are, and this is bad for China because what that means is right now, most of the lithium is, or is processed in China. Vast majority, like 80 plus percent of lithium ore is refined in China. So now if you go the Peter Zehan route and think about de globalization now, Chile is right here next door to us and is not only. Not only the second largest deposit of lithium, but also willing to do the refining in country as a value add. There you go. So

Sir Gene:

I mean, good for them from their standpoint, but it's definitely not good for people buying Teslas.

Dude Named Ben:

Why?

Sir Gene:

Cause the price of lithium is going to go up.

Dude Named Ben:

Not necessarily. Why would it?

Sir Gene:

I think it will.

Dude Named Ben:

Chilean average income is less than China. China is not cheap anymore, dude.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, no, they're not, but

Dude Named Ben:

So, yeah I don't know that it'll change the price of lithium, but what it'll certainly do is bring more benefit to the economy of Chile.

Sir Gene:

where did they just discover a bunch of lithium? Was it Afghanistan?

Dude Named Ben:

no, it was Iran.

Sir Gene:

Oh, it was Iran. Okay. Yeah. Interesting. Hey, so have you watched that video that I sent you about fusion?

Dude Named Ben:

I watched part of it.

Sir Gene:

No, you didn't watch the whole thing.

Dude Named Ben:

No, because I don't think, there's nothing new there.

Sir Gene:

I disagree. I think that their method is pretty interesting and it's very different

Dude Named Ben:

pulse reactor.

Sir Gene:

it's very different than what they're doing in Europe with tokamak.

Dude Named Ben:

Right, but, I mean, Some of the first attempts at fusion were what they're doing in a pulse reactor.

Sir Gene:

Right. But they're actually building it commercially.

Dude Named Ben:

No, they're experimenting with it commercially and hoping to build it commercially. It is not a commercially viable product And it's probably never going to be. That's the thing is

Sir Gene:

That's where we disagree. I think,

Dude Named Ben:

okay. So how do you get power from a fusion reactor?

Sir Gene:

well, that's the cool thing with their method is it is literally a direct electrical producer. It is not using hot water, which is what Tokamak is using.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. But how is it directly producing that electricity?

Sir Gene:

It's charging capacitors.

Dude Named Ben:

Through what means?

Sir Gene:

Well, you gotta watch the rest of the video to find out. There's a reason I sent you the video, so then you can explain the shit to me after watching it.

Dude Named Ben:

okay, so they're creating a high energy plasma and then siphoning off the free electrons, right? Which then creates positively charged ions, which then would attract free electrons or pull electrons from outside material and so on. A, this is a pulse reactor. So it's not creating a steady stream of power. It's pulse

Sir Gene:

it's, yeah, it's running at 60 Hertz, but yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

doesn't matter. Also it's just, that's a very inefficient way of pulling out electricity is to try and create plasma and then siphon off free electrons. First of all, there's no good, efficient

Sir Gene:

of the video first before you, you assume that's what they're doing because they get into the details the day end of the video. So if y'all wanna watch the first half, you didn't get to the detail.

Dude Named Ben:

I watched the first few minutes and went cuz they're like, oh, this is so amazing. I'm like,

Sir Gene:

Okay, well, do me a favor and

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. Send it to me again and I will,

Sir Gene:

Oh my God, just scroll up. I don't need to resend it. Just scroll up in the frickin in the signal.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

It's where it's sitting.

Dude Named Ben:

So.

Sir Gene:

But it's like, there's an hour there, and then for paid members, there's another two hours worth of content. But the...

Dude Named Ben:

an hour of, oh my God, fan boy

Sir Gene:

the cool thing about this is

Dude Named Ben:

Jean it's astonishing to me that you like the

Sir Gene:

pop science,

Dude Named Ben:

well, the fusion fan fiction, I'll call it.

Sir Gene:

whatever, dude, it's going to happen soon. And you think these guys, I think are really close. They've got a bunch of patents and their goal. Is very much making it cheap and making it commercialized.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. But let me ask you something. Why do we need fusion versus vision? Our fission, we are not taking advantage of fission the way we should,

Sir Gene:

fusion reactor is small enough to go on a spaceship. And that's why I give a shit about

Dude Named Ben:

none of them are yet. And you can do fit. There are actual fission reactors that are actually in a spaceship currently. So. Can go tea kettle and go with a pretty small fission reaction, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2. There are several probes that NASA has sent up with fission power. I don't see the issue here.

Sir Gene:

vision power. You mean fusion? No, you mean fission. Yeah, no, they're I thought they were using radioscopic generators in there.

Dude Named Ben:

the form of vision.

Sir Gene:

Well, it's, yeah, I mean, it's generating heat and electricity as a result of that heat. But this thing it's clean. It's relatively small for what the output is and. Ultimately, I think it's going to be the missing link for creating a multi planetary species. I think we'll be hard pressed to do it using just chemical propellants.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, I don't think we should go the chemical propellant route for all interstellar travel, but I don't see how vision gets us there either. You have to have a propellant of some kind. So you've got to throw something out the back to make it work.

Sir Gene:

lithium.

Dude Named Ben:

Lithium would be an extremely expensive one.

Sir Gene:

Well, it would be, well, it might be expensive in terms of prices, but only until you mine

Dude Named Ben:

I'm not even talking about prices. I'm talking about, it just wouldn't be a very efficient one. Right. And if you look at like ion drives or things like that,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. But you have,

Dude Named Ben:

it, but it's a lot of, and here's the thing we're not talking once you're in orbit or out of orbit you don't need a whole lot of thrust. And that's why ion drives and things like that work. But for man spacecraft, way too slow.

Sir Gene:

yeah, exactly. That's why you do need the thrust. It's because. If you want to move humans around a year, you can't just be floating around for three years waiting to get to Jupiter. You've got to do it much faster. Ideally, and this is what I love about the expanse when they did it. You have a trajectory, so you solve two problems at once. You don't need gravity because you're generating it through acceleration and you have the fastest path at a fixed acceleration. So you end up getting there way faster using that. The travel between earth and Mars, was it like four days?

Dude Named Ben:

If you have the fuel capacity to do it,

Sir Gene:

Right. And that's where fission comes in.

Dude Named Ben:

fission does not solve that problem.

Sir Gene:

I think it, it solves one of the components of that problem

Dude Named Ben:

which is.

Sir Gene:

which is any really high ISP form of propulsion requires massive amounts of electricity.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay. I, you still had the propellant problem.

Sir Gene:

Well, the propellant, I mean, it does deplete obviously, but you're a factor of magnitude more efficient than you are with chemical propellants.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, okay. Let me ask you this because you're not, you're dancing around this. What propellant does it use and how does it work to have a fission or fusion engine on a spacecraft?

Sir Gene:

Sure. Well, lithium is probably going to be the most likely one, but because you can, given enough electricity, you can generate massive thrust and lithium. You're going to get a nice P that's about 10 times better than you do with hydrogen. Now, it's not as going to be as good an ASP as you get

Dude Named Ben:

So you're going to use electrical energy to burn lithium.

Sir Gene:

when you're not really burning lithium you're breaking down the lithium and then pushing back against the lithium atoms using magnetism. So you're still spitting something out the back, but right now, like the SpaceX is using Argon on their satellites. Which is good, Argonne is cheaper. That's the main reason they're using it versus Xenon where that's going to give you the highest size speed. That's going to be a hundred

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. But they're just talking on those. Satellites, you're just talking a little CRC reaction, thruster type things, controlled

Sir Gene:

CRC. What do you, what's CRC?

Dude Named Ben:

reaction, something I can't remember.

Sir Gene:

Okay. Yeah. I mean, they're ion drives basically. The little thrusters on the satellites and those give you really good efficiency, but are. Capability to build those right now is limited in the amount of thrust they provide. They're very low thrust and scaling them, even if you slap on a ton of them on there, you have a physical size problem to where they don't provide anywhere near the thrust for the size of the thruster that you have with chemical. So the compromise that what's between those in terms of efficiency. Is going to be using lithium, but that requires crazy high voltages.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, ion thrusters have some efficiencies, but it and does require quite a bit of energy. I, my entire point here though is you're still, any type of ion thruster you're either gonna blow through a ton of fuel or have limited acceleration. At this point,

Sir Gene:

Well,

Dude Named Ben:

you get to where you have, you're moving fast enough through space that you can have Bussard esque collectors to gather your fuel while you go. You've got a problem.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, well you do, but right now, like. Hydrogen is about given our current engines about 450 ISP. Whereas methane is about 350 and

Dude Named Ben:

you realize we've lost the entire audience

Sir Gene:

no, there's everybody that listens to us likes rockets. And RP one rocket fuel is between two 60 and three 30, three 40 on the high side. So if we go like lithium, we'll get us to three and a half thousand. But Xenon gets us to 10, 000 ISP. So there is a much more efficient method that we can utilize. But the problem is again, is you run into an issue of physical size just gets unruly. Kills the efficiency, unless you're fine with something really low thrust Adjusting a satellite's orbit. You don't need a whole lot of thrust for that.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. So, did you watch the CNN town hall?

Sir Gene:

Yeah, of course.

Dude Named Ben:

Now, how did you watch it? Did you watch it on TimCast

Sir Gene:

it via Tim cast. Yes. Yes

Dude Named Ben:

Okay, so I watched it a total of 3 times. I watched it fully independently on my own. I watched Crowder's commentary and I watched Tim Kask's commentary

Sir Gene:

Damn.

Dude Named Ben:

It's interesting to see the distinction between the 2, but yeah, CNN cut that. Over 20 minutes short because of how bad of a bloodbath it was

Sir Gene:

They realized that they made a mistake.

Dude Named Ben:

And he realized Trump was doing really well. And

Sir Gene:

and I'm not a big fan of Trump and I don't think he ought to be running for president. I've said this plenty of times, but

Dude Named Ben:

he can win.

Sir Gene:

I will say I'm definitely voting for him, even though I think the Democrats are going to steal the election from him. Because he was better than I've ever seen him on CNN.

Dude Named Ben:

I mean, he was better than 2016.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, absolutely. That's what I mean. He,

Dude Named Ben:

I mean, absolutely owning his mistakes saying, yeah, we should have done this differently. I screwed up here. I mean, really

Sir Gene:

was on the same page as the audience and CNN was from Mars

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah

Sir Gene:

or Europe. Take your

Dude Named Ben:

I loved his comments about the debt ceiling and she goes, well, that's not what you said when you're president. He goes, yeah, but I'm not president anymore. And she just at 1 point. I mean,

Sir Gene:

I thought you still were

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, he, I mean, he was, he hammered it home, man, he really pressed the advantage and, she would, she lied several times on her quote unquote fact checks, but

Sir Gene:

like, mostly she lied. And whoever was whispering she wasn't lying. She doesn't know any of this shit. She's repeating what they're telling her in her ear.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, and the IFB sure, but it was hilarious because she's coming out and attacking him and I loved the way he handled it and going. Boy, you're a nasty person and just perfect, not personal insult but

Sir Gene:

Yeah

Dude Named Ben:

out to everyone that, what she was doing, just calling her out and he, he was quick and, Mr. Trump, why on January 6th, did you wait three hours? I didn't. Yeah, you did. Yeah, you did. All right. I've got to whip it out. There's going to be so many means made of Trump whipping it out. First of all, he knew exactly what he was doing using that terminology. Right? So he pulls out this piece of paper and reads off his tweet, less than 30 minutes after he had finished his speech and reads off his speech and everything else goes. It was a perfect rebuttal to all the January

Sir Gene:

I love when he pulled that piece of paper out of his pocket. That was just the biggest fuck you, man.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah, absolutely. I've got my own facts here. Thank you.

Sir Gene:

And given that she's got the whole networks worth of research people whispering in her ear, and he's just going off of, just his brain. I really thought this was the best Trump I've ever seen.

Dude Named Ben:

Yep. And

Sir Gene:

just sad that he's so fucking old. If this. If this was Trump 10 or 15 years ago, you would have had three terms,

Dude Named Ben:

well, he can't, but yes

Sir Gene:

back to differ.

Dude Named Ben:

constitutionally he cannot.

Sir Gene:

We would have come up with a way to do it.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, after Roosevelt, we

Sir Gene:

What do you mean

Dude Named Ben:

didn't want any more of that.

Sir Gene:

That's not a constitutional thing. Roosevelt did

Dude Named Ben:

it is. And after Roosevelt, there was an amendment to prevent any other

Sir Gene:

Wait, really? Which amendment is that? I don't recall that one. Is that like a 20 something?

Dude Named Ben:

It was,

Sir Gene:

they really make an amendment? I thought they, they just sort of. Informally agreed that, yeah, this ain't going to fly again.

Dude Named Ben:

presidential term limits 22nd amendment section one. No person shall be elected to the office of president more than twice.

Sir Gene:

what year was that ratified? Have that? Just wondering how many years after

Dude Named Ben:

on 19. It was completed in 19 51. It started

Sir Gene:

always drags their heels.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

47. Okay.

Dude Named Ben:

Alaska and Hawaii were not States yet.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. You keep telling me that, but I don't know. It's just, I have this feeling that they still were.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway. Yeah. So it's constitutional amendment.

Sir Gene:

Well, but what if he's vice president after he's president and then the president dies?

Dude Named Ben:

Yes. So

Sir Gene:

It's only about elected, isn't it?

Dude Named Ben:

yes, so you can serve a total of 10 years as president. So if you are vice president and you sir and

Sir Gene:

Obama has been doing it for

Dude Named Ben:

Someone's assassinated and or whatever you become president. If you become president in for three years, well, you can only run for one more term. If you were two years in, then you can run for two terms for a total of 10 years as a maximum.

Sir Gene:

Interesting. Well, that's annoying.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway I think what's going to very likely happen. And there has been a lot in the conservative space pushing for this. I don't think DeSantis is going to run. I do not think DeSantis is going to challenge him.

Sir Gene:

Damn.

Dude Named Ben:

I think DeSantis is going to be VP. That's, I think that's going to be the negotiated

Sir Gene:

you think he's

Dude Named Ben:

happens right now.

Sir Gene:

you think Trump is going to be okay with it?

Dude Named Ben:

I think DeSantis does nothing but lose if he goes up against Trump.

Sir Gene:

At this point, I think it's probably likely, but

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, it's a foregone

Sir Gene:

doesn't go up against Trump, it's going to get harder for him to get elected on the next time,

Dude Named Ben:

I don't, I disagree.

Sir Gene:

because I think he'd be, well, let me put it this way.

Dude Named Ben:

Trump will bloody him up and tarnish him.

Sir Gene:

Well, maybe that's what you need. So here's my thought is there will be other candidates besides Trump. Obviously.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, we've got Vivek.

Sir Gene:

exactly.

Dude Named Ben:

is awesome.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Which I like him a lot. And he really, he like, he should be a Senator though. I feel

Dude Named Ben:

He's going to have a cabinet position.

Sir Gene:

yeah, I don't, yeah, maybe I think he needs, this is the one thing he's missing is he needs to get elected. Like there is no, you can have a whole bunch of people like him.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. If he were a more popular person, he's trying to pull a Trump and

Sir Gene:

I'm not a politician like me. Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

it's not just that, Trump, I mean, my God,

Sir Gene:

I'm a billionaire. Like me. I get it. I get it.

Dude Named Ben:

No, it's not even that Trump had so much media access beforehand. And, his name

Sir Gene:

I'm a game show guy, like me. So anyway, so if DeSantis does not run or if DeSantis is not on the ballot, I think it sets everybody who was on the ballot, including Vivek up at an advantage against DeSantis four years from now

Dude Named Ben:

Totally disagree.

Sir Gene:

or six years from now, because they will have already been on the ballot. They will be a more known quality.

Dude Named Ben:

DeSantis will be on the ballot as the VP. That's the negotiation that's

Sir Gene:

okay. Okay. Well, let me change it then let's say DeSantis isn't the VP and Trump once again in his crazy brilliant move decides to pull in whoever he's being told you're missing from the voter base. Oh, you need those crazy Christians. You better get a guy no one's ever heard of. That's a going to bring in that base and it's definitely not going to be DeSantis. And then he gets that now in that scenario, does DeSantis run or not?

Dude Named Ben:

DeSantis does not have the promise of VP, I think, yes, he's going to run.

Sir Gene:

Okay. All right. So if DeSantis. I really don't like VP. I'd rather keep him in Florida, frankly, because a VP is such a stupid position. like Vivek would be much better as a VP.

Dude Named Ben:

I, there's no chance in hell of that.

Sir Gene:

If he did the VP thing, it'd be a shoo in for him to take the next.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, but I don't see him being VP.

Sir Gene:

But I think anybody that wants to make a serious run in four years or six years, whatever needs to run against Trump just to get on TV, just to get in the debates, just to demonstrate. Their ability, this is how guys like Ted Cruz got washed out is because he looked like a

Dude Named Ben:

went up against Trump.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, exactly. He looked like a good candidate to me. I liked them. And then when you see them up against Trump, it's like, Oh shit. Yeah no, not going to happen. So I think that anybody that just decides to sit out this election and not go up against Trump and then wants to run in four years. Is going to run into some serious trouble from the people that didn't sit out this election.

Dude Named Ben:

we'll see.

Sir Gene:

Do you think that's not going to be the case? I mean, I want to be challenged here if you don't agree

Dude Named Ben:

I think that it depends on the individual. I think someone like the Santas sitting out doesn't hurt him at all.

Sir Gene:

Because you could just say, well, I've decided that for the sake of Florida, I'm going to focus on Florida for the time being.

Dude Named Ben:

correct. And he could, so he's term limited. That's a problem for him. And he, they just changed the Florida law where he doesn't have to resign to run. So that increases the likelihood of him running. But I think he would be better served sitting it out versus getting beat up by Trump because Trump, I mean, we saw it over and over again with Ted Cruz. Now, Ted Cruz. Got bruised up by Trump and then dropped the hell out and got on Trump's side real quick. So, there's that.

Sir Gene:

Well, and that's the thing is like the whole damn thing could be planned. They could have him run knowing that he's going to drop out. And in a

Dude Named Ben:

I just don't think they plan anything without him getting promised something pretty big. And I think that would have to be

Sir Gene:

you don't think he'd take a cabinet position.

Dude Named Ben:

Why would he? That's not... Why would he... He is the second biggest name in the Republican Party right

Sir Gene:

He probably is. Yeah, that's true. then, but man, the veep is never the second biggest name in the party. That's the thing that's going against it in my mind is that if he has the second biggest name in the party accepts a V position, he's diminishing himself

Dude Named Ben:

I don't think so. I think he's setting himself up as the obvious successor.

Sir Gene:

well, he's doing what George Bush

Dude Named Ben:

one runs against him if he's VP and in, 20 what, 28, he says, okay, thank you. Mr. Trump is the, for all four years was a good vice president, executed it. Well, showed us who he was and he decides he's going to run for president. No one runs against him.

Sir Gene:

Knowing Trump, if he would manage to not support him, he would like decide that he likes somebody other than his veep. While he's still in office.

Dude Named Ben:

Again, it all is going to come down to loyalty. If he's loyal now, I think Trump's a very little person and would support him. I think that's the reason why

Sir Gene:

Trump's also temperamental.

Dude Named Ben:

He's really not. He's pretty straightforward.

Sir Gene:

I know, man. I think he is temperamental.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway

Sir Gene:

it's all,

Dude Named Ben:

trump rocked the debate versus CNN, even though it's supposed to be a town hall.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it, did you see that? I should have fucking kept their mouth shut? They just came off looking

Dude Named Ben:

Well, it wasn't, they were adversarial. They were flat out adversarial

Sir Gene:

They decided it'd be appropriate to fact check him in real time and managed to be wrong 80% of the time.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes, and 1 of the 1 of the best things that came out of this was the the panel they had afterwards. I don't know if you watch

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, of course.

Dude Named Ben:

of, voters and the panel sitting there and they said, are you so why are you disturbed by him bringing up the elections in

Sir Gene:

He's still living in the past. He's still talking about January 6th. What?

Dude Named Ben:

And they're like. That was the first thing you asked him

Sir Gene:

huh. Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

What do you mean?

Sir Gene:

Couldn't he just say, Hey, it's time to move on or something.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, but why did then you, why

Sir Gene:

the guy's like, yeah, what, what did, why didn't CNN just move on? What, why do they have to ask?

Dude Named Ben:

I mean,

Sir Gene:

was great. They got fucked you by the panel as well.

Dude Named Ben:

absolutely, which yeah, it's just

Sir Gene:

It's it was done very well. I will agree with that. The. It's so stupid, such a dumb move on CNN's part. I gotta say though, that chick has more balls than most male fucking heads. Because literally standing two feet away from a very imposing Trump, and to his face, telling him, no, that's a lie, that's not what happened. You're lying about that, even if she believed it, most people wouldn't have the balls to say that to a guy like Trump standing right next to him. It's one thing to say it when you're sitting at a desk and you're watching a video on the screen of him, but to have him standing there and be telling him, no, that's not true. You're lying right now. Holy shit, dude. I don't think I'd do that. I would not want to do that. That's for sure.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, and Trump is a very imposing figure. I mean, Trump is not a diminutive man. He, people like to make fun of his weight and

Sir Gene:

no, he's like six feet sideways and up and down.

Dude Named Ben:

But anyway, it was pretty interesting and telling also that they went to commercial break twice,

Sir Gene:

That was

Dude Named Ben:

which typically you do not do on something like this at all. And they went to commercial break twice, and there was obviously some unplanned tension there. And I think Trump was like, what the hell is going on? Because we go into commercial break with them sitting and, everything being good and come back with them standing. And just this, like, tension, like, I wonder if he was yelling, like, what the fuck are you doing? This was not what we agreed to or what

Sir Gene:

Somebody was, I'm sure if it wasn't him.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that's, see, this is where I think what Musk has done with buying Twitter. It's something that I think some of us expected Trump to do at some point is just by CNN.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I mean, he's Trump's been hobbled, dude. Trump has lost a shit ton of money over being president has.

Sir Gene:

I believe that. I believe that.

Dude Named Ben:

well, I mean, his tax returns show that, not only did he lose a shit ton of money for being president but he never took a salary. He donated it. He is really sacrificed for this country in a lot of

Sir Gene:

a minor thing. That's like 300 grand a year for a billionaire. That's a drop in the bucket.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Well, when you're losing money, every drop counts, dude.

Sir Gene:

What couldn't he just talk to Nancy Pelosi and get some stock tips or something? She seems to be doing pretty well.

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway let's see. What was the other thing I wanted to say and talk about?

Sir Gene:

I don't know. My food's almost showing up here. So

Dude Named Ben:

What was it? Well, well, there's the trad wife stuff that you and I talked about this week. And then there was some others. There's something else that

Sir Gene:

What about those

Dude Named Ben:

Anyway, I'm trying to think of the other 1. Damn it.

Sir Gene:

tradwives?

Dude Named Ben:

Been to Singapore?

Sir Gene:

no, never have. It looks beautiful. I've seen videos.

Dude Named Ben:

I'll let you

Sir Gene:

airline.

Dude Named Ben:

Yes, they do. Fantastic. I may be I may let you know how it is

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. Got your next James Bond trip lined up.

Dude Named Ben:

my next what? My next what?

Sir Gene:

I don't know what you heard.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah. There, there was definitely some commentary on no agenda social about when I'm gonna come out on which agency I work

Sir Gene:

Huh. We're all waiting with bated breath.

Dude Named Ben:

I did appreciate the memes of Gene riding the bike,

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's what we're

Dude Named Ben:

appreciated'em as

Sir Gene:

Here's the thing. I really don't mind that kind of stuff. I think some people probably assume that I'm pissed off. I'm really not. I'm not like, Oh, thank God somebody finally made me after all these years either. I just am ambivalent about it, but I really, I don't mind. Oh, well, you saw my comment in there. I

Dude Named Ben:

love the dumb look they gave you.

Sir Gene:

the dumb look. Oh, is that what the response was? I said, Hey man, fake news. My helmet was always white. Why are you making it blue on here?

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, well, I just like the dur look of the cartoon.

Sir Gene:

Well, obviously it looks nothing like me, but but like for a guy that uses a cartoon image to begin with, it is funny that they had to use a different cartoon image for the meme. It's like, you literally have the cartoon already sitting there on my profile. One of these days I need to update it. I've got a lot more gray in my beard than when that cartoon was made.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Like 10 years

Dude Named Ben:

beard is definitely gray at this point. My beard in my temples.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I will tell you, I got like the goatee portion started graying and then my, the top of my sideburns at like towards the top of the year started graying. Those were the first. Two areas that started going towards gray, but at this point it is pretty damn even all throughout my beard. So there's not a whole lot of difference between my sideburns my top of my head or my beard. It's all getting grayer. And that's what happens. And

Dude Named Ben:

You've heard the Joe Rogan skit on ball hair color. Go watch the Joe Rogan skit about ball

Sir Gene:

You don't want to just repeat it for the folks here.

Dude Named Ben:

Fuck making this. We got to focus on keeping this dude alive. It's funny. I can't repeat it all,

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Dude Named Ben:

it's hilarious.

Sir Gene:

I will look it up. Yeah, it's it's interesting thing. And I was always very curious when I was young, before I had gray hair, like, can you see the hair changing color? Cause obviously it's not all happening overnight. And the answer is very much yes. And having a long beard. And this is why I think for most guys, you don't really see it happening. It's cause you shave. And your hair and your head is fairly short, but when you have a beard that's about a foot and a half long, I have plenty of hair that is like reddish brown on the bottom and then turns gray. About 10 inches up and then it's all gray, moving the rest of the way into my face. So, the, I would say the actual change is fairly quick. Like it, it goes from Brown to white in about half an inch of hair. So what it was half an inch. I'm trying to remember how fast the damn hair grows on beards, or at least on my beard, I want to say half an inch is probably about a month and a half, maybe two months. No, it's probably a month. It's probably between a month and a half. So that's how fast it goes from an individual hair level. It goes from your natural color to the new natural color white, but it does it on a one hair at a time basis. So. And that's how you end up with gray is because some of your hairs are still the original color and some are changed.

Dude Named Ben:

So have you noticed gun websites now having a, are you 18 and up click through?

Sir Gene:

No,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Palmetto state. I was just going through cleaning out browser tabs while we're talking and I hit the Palmetto state one and it it hit me with an 18 and up and I hit the no button and it redirected me to the ATF.

Sir Gene:

I don't think the ATF can force them to do that, but the credit card company can definitely force them to do that

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. It's it's.

Sir Gene:

now that they're isolating all gun purchases as being equivalent to illegal drug purchases.

Dude Named Ben:

That's some shit.

Sir Gene:

This is the, a lot of the problems that we currently have stem from the banking sector.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, absolutely. Which, by the way, you should 100% read Agenda 21, one of Glenn Beck's novels. It's it's interesting.

Sir Gene:

that our book for the episode?

Dude Named Ben:

Sure. I'm not done with it, but I'm pretty

Sir Gene:

Is it a long book? Is it a thick book?

Dude Named Ben:

I don't know. I think the auto book is like 10 hours or

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's not too bad.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, he's written some, I'm not a huge Glenn Beck fan by any stretch. Let me find the other one by him. But he introduces some of the really good concepts. That he talks about on, his shows and everything else that he's done. Like, let's see Overton window being one of them, things like that. So let me try and find

Sir Gene:

Use dry erase markers in this book.

Dude Named Ben:

Sure. Seems like it, right?

Sir Gene:

I, I listened to Glenn back when he was a DJ and it was. Fascinating watching his evolution from a DJ to a conservative commentator, to a Fox news crazy dude that drew with dry erase markers and connected dots on everything to going deaf, to moving to his own whole network and seem, and then having a very good long format interview show,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, well,

Sir Gene:

I, like, I think I started listening to him back in the early nineties.

Dude Named Ben:

Beck, especially his Fox News show was a InfoWars light

Sir Gene:

it was totally that. Yes.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, and,

Sir Gene:

less yelling.

Dude Named Ben:

with less yelling more in depth and the problem and the reason why I think he got kicked off Fox News is because he stumbled across Soros and kept calling Soros spooky dude and focusing in on it. Which, by the way, the other series of books, fiction books that he wrote that's pretty good is the Overton window and the eye of Moloch, which, for those of you who don't know, the Overton window is a marketing term, and it's basically saying this is the window of ideas that the public will accept, and you move the window by pushing on one side of it or the other. So, for instance, we accept gay marriage and now we push towards other things and that's how that moves.

Sir Gene:

So do you think it's useful to know what the enemy is doing?

Dude Named Ben:

Absolutely.

Sir Gene:

Okay. How many George Soros books have you read?

Dude Named Ben:

A couple.

Sir Gene:

Which ones

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, let

Sir Gene:

like once he's written, once he's written, not about him.

Dude Named Ben:

I think he's only written one.

Sir Gene:

It's written 15 books.

Dude Named Ben:

Fifteen. Okay. Let's see. I've read the alchemy of finance. Let's see. What else have I read? I've listened to a bunch of his different lectures.

Sir Gene:

I think that was his first one was alchemy of finance.

Dude Named Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

I think that was his first one. The alchemy of finance. That's what they do. Spirit cooking,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. Which by the way, his books are incredibly cheap on on audible right now. Yeah. Alchemy of finances five four 95. The new paradigm financial mark

Sir Gene:

for the ebook. Not the physical book though. Right? Yeah. Cause I was going to say you'd lose money on that.

Dude Named Ben:

for 799 in defense of open society is 14 crash of 2008. What it means is 499. The source lectures and central European universities. 1270. Yeah. Like, it's all cheap.

Sir Gene:

Well, I haven't read any, so I'm not trying to make you look like you're not doing it, but. Since I haven't read any, I was curious if you'd read any of his books, because I think it's, I didn't realize he had that many books. I probably should read at least a few of his books.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. So, I mean, I've been doing this for a long time. If I turn around and look at my bookshelf, which sorry, if I went off the mic here, like, I have rules for radicals. I have the coming insurrection. I have tragedy and hope, I've got quite a few on there,

Sir Gene:

That's that Obama book.

Dude Named Ben:

but tragedy and hope. No, that is over a thousand pages written by Carol Quigley and really what led to the current world paradigm where we do nothing but proxy wars, which Carol Quigley, if you don't know, was who got Clinton to be a Rhodes Scholar.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, I was being facetious, but I have not read that book. Yeah. And I did a podcast episode a few months ago with a guy on rules for radicals where we were dissecting that book. But I do think that it is useful to understand what people that are wrong, which is what I call people that don't think like I do what they're thinking. And the books are a great way to do that because not only do you understand what the person that wrote the book is thinking, but you're understanding what their disciples are thinking.

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah, indeed.

Sir Gene:

And generally that's the people that You're going to be up against the most, isn't the actual figurehead. It's going to be all the people that are willing to do things in that person's name.

Dude Named Ben:

So when did you first read Dianetics? That was a joke, Gene. That was a

Sir Gene:

well, I mean, I can tell you, I think it was making 89.

Dude Named Ben:

For those who don't know, that's the book that

Sir Gene:

Oh, run

Dude Named Ben:

founded science. Yeah. Scientology.

Sir Gene:

the book with all the answers

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah. And it's interesting because it was in competition with stranger in a strange land.

Sir Gene:

in what do you mean in competition? Oh,

Dude Named Ben:

So they had a bet to see who could start a religion. And L Ron Hubbard wrote Dianetics and what's his name. God, I mean, Moon is a Irish mistress and I've read almost all of it. Heinlein wrote wrote Stranger in a Strange Land which if you haven't read the book, you certainly don't grok it.

Sir Gene:

exactly. No, it's, I think. It, I always get a chuckle when John uses the word grok on the agenda,

Dude Named Ben:

Why?

Sir Gene:

because he's not the person that I think of that word coming out of their mouth.

Dude Named Ben:

I don't know.

Sir Gene:

There are personality wise. I just, that it doesn't sound natural to me.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

It's like an old dude using a modern verbal parlance.

Dude Named Ben:

I don't think, it.

Sir Gene:

I know that's just, I'm making fun of the fact that I'm so old that to me, it sounds like it's still modern.

Dude Named Ben:

It's I wonder, part of me wonders if the etymology of grep came out of grok

Sir Gene:

You mean grep as in processing text?

Dude Named Ben:

as in the search. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

I would doubt it.

Dude Named Ben:

Kind of makes sense.

Sir Gene:

Well, doesn't Greg, I mean, I always assumed it just means, do you understand this? Do you Grog it?

Dude Named Ben:

Right, but it's a it's a fictional word.

Sir Gene:

It's yeah but it's not a complex fictional word. I don't think, I think it's a fairly simple fictional word. Like it doesn't have a bunch of meanings, which he could

Dude Named Ben:

Right, it's intuitive understanding and empathy.

Sir Gene:

It's intuitive understanding. That's not what I got out of reading that.

Dude Named Ben:

Okay, well, definition, Oxford language, GROC, informal US use, understanding something intuitively or by empathy.

Sir Gene:

well, then it makes no sense to ask somebody if they grok a concept, you just explain to them, which is he does in that book

Dude Named Ben:

Well, I don't know, dude.

Sir Gene:

because that's not intuitive.

Dude Named Ben:

They're changing language all the time. I wouldn't be surprised. agree with you. That is not the, that is not the implied meaning in the book.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, because I assumed the meaning was what I got from book, which is just simply a synonym for understand and they're okay. Well, whatever. I don't know. There, there's just, we're in an age where there's too much data and there's too many good books to read and there's too many TV shows that are worth watching. And they're generally not brand new. They're reruns. And there's too many good video games. There's too many good everything. And the one element that is finite here, at least it's time, at least until we figure out how to accelerate. Now I will say that time does become a lot more relativistic in dreams. Meaning I can have a dream that encompasses years in a matter of about 12 minutes, but I still have not really gotten the ability to be able to read books in the dream. I would love to be able to do that. Can you imagine the speed that you could read an entire book in about an hour of actual time while dreaming where that would be like 16 hours. Of time in a dream,

Dude Named Ben:

Yeah just wait till Neuralink.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, exactly. And it's, it just like, it didn't remind me of this, but now that I think about it, it's like the, I know Kung Fu, in the matrix where he picks up Kung Fu, like in a matter of It's that idea. But you experienced this as well, don't you? I mean, I assume I'm not unique in this. The time dilation in dreams.

Dude Named Ben:

Oh, yeah, absolutely.

Sir Gene:

So like, I'll, look at my watch as I'm turning in bed or something. And then I'm still not awake yet. So I'll fall back asleep. I'll have a dream that takes, hours, if not days of time going happening in the dream. And when I wake up, I walk, look at my watch again. And it looks like only in about 12 minutes went by. That's pretty cool. I like that.

Dude Named Ben:

not uncommon.

Sir Gene:

So that means we ought to be, see, this is why do people give me shit for listening to podcasts at one and a half X when I dream at like 10 X and so do you. So does everybody,

Dude Named Ben:

not normal pace. But anyway,

Sir Gene:

but you're what you don't feel it. And when you're dreaming, right, it seems totally normal. You don't go, Oh my God, why is everybody talking so fast? And everything's moving really fast.

Dude Named Ben:

so

Sir Gene:

makes up for it. So just learn to do it in real life to them.

Dude Named Ben:

one last topic, and then I guess we can close it

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Dude Named Ben:

So we, I went down the rabbit hole of looking at the whole trad wife movement and everything else. And the one thing that I was shocked to

Sir Gene:

traditional wife, right?

Dude Named Ben:

yes, and you had a funny comment on it, but I was shocked to find a large portion well, I don't know how large, but way more than I would have ever assumed online of. Male to female transsexuals. In the movement,

Sir Gene:

That does not surprise me at all.

Dude Named Ben:

it shocked the hell out of me

Sir Gene:

No, because if a dude wants to feel and be feminine, they're not going to want to become a feminist. They're going to want to. Act like, and participate in feminine activities, which trad wife would totally fall in line with that. I would think,

Dude Named Ben:

and it's definitely the hyper feminine ones. And anyway, it was just an interesting thing. I think I, I take the entire the movement in its entirety as a positive thing. I think we're going to see, people stepping back to that sort of

Sir Gene:

and let me play off of that. Is there anything wrong with that? Do you have a problem with the transsexuals wanting to be trad wives?

Dude Named Ben:

No, not at all.

Sir Gene:

I much would prefer that as their behavior model versus the it's ma'am. Can't you see a ma'am? God damn it. I'm going to beat your ass. If you don't say ma'am, the. The ones that act like dudes while pretending to be chicks are the problem. The ones that,

Dude Named Ben:

that clearly don't

Sir Gene:

like chicks. Not really a problem in my mind.

Dude Named Ben:

Well, and again, and there was some commentary on the Tim cast podcast when he had that what was the guy's name? The liberal.

Sir Gene:

The la the latest one you have the surf guy. The somebody from the surfs? Yeah.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, he had that guy on and in the after segments it got posted all over the place. Blaze and daily wire did a reaction video to it of him talking about how filleting a trans woman would not be gay. And the blaze and daily wire

Sir Gene:

Can I go beyond that and just say that eating pussy is pretty,

Dude Named Ben:

Why

Sir Gene:

It's just a gay activity, dude. Your mouth does not belong down there.

Dude Named Ben:

do you did surgeon speaks

Sir Gene:

It's like, below the belt shit. That's for chicks. That's not for guys.

Dude Named Ben:

Do you did surgeon speaks? Yeah. Okay.

Sir Gene:

What do you think? I'm going to get a lot of hate mail on that one. Good luck.

Dude Named Ben:

whatever, man. But anyway, it's funny because the way Tim and daily wire and everybody put it is, yes, it makes you gay and. And my immediate reaction and I think yours too was, well, if I have sex with Buck Angel, does that make me straight? Because

Sir Gene:

Cause

Dude Named Ben:

that's a,

Sir Gene:

yeah it's nuts. It's just people that can't call a spade.

Dude Named Ben:

well, I mean, you can't sit there and say, and I think both. Sides are absolutely ridiculous in this, right? Because no, having sex with Buck Angel would be pretty gay, if you ask me,

Sir Gene:

be pretty gay.

Dude Named Ben:

looks like a dude.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Like feeling mustache and beard hair around your cock. Pretty gay.

Dude Named Ben:

yeah, I wasn't even going there, but okay.

Sir Gene:

Oh, have you seen Buck Angel?

Dude Named Ben:

Yes. Anyway,

Sir Gene:

yeah,

Dude Named Ben:

just to say, there's a spectrum. I think that we are seeing a turn. I. Think part of our conversation last week where, men are finally getting to the point where they've put up with enough and the pendulum is swinging is what I'm saying and what

Sir Gene:

I really hope so, man. I'm trying to be cautiously optimistic. I'm not, I generally don't jump on the optimist bandwagon because I always see the, the turn to the wrong side in the shadows, but I hope that's the case. And just to clarify, going down on chicks is gay. It's not gay because they're women. It's gay in the sense of it's a submissive act, no matter who's doing it, when you're below the belt, that's. That's not a power move. That's not, that's not the

Dude Named Ben:

You obviously don't know what you're doing there.

Sir Gene:

has nothing to do with knowing what you're doing. It has to do with your position relative to the other person. You like getting pegged by your wife and you think that's masculine. Good for you. I would say that's

Dude Named Ben:

never done that. Never would.

Sir Gene:

Well, the gateway to that is eating out pussy. And with that, we'll go ahead and wrap it up. Hope y'all had a good old time. We've tried to cover as many topics as thought of at the moment, because none of this is scripted.

Dude Named Ben:

I'm going to go get my armadillo eggs off the

Sir Gene:

Yeah, you get, yeah. You've been dragging your armadillo eggs for a while. You might've want to pick them up.